L'Ordre

L'Ordre

All regimes are illegitimate: the day after America’s End of History

posted by Harry J. Bentham

By sealing our work with our blood, we may see at least the bright dawn of universal happiness.

En scellant notre ouvrage de notre sang, nous puissions voir au moins briller l’aurore de la félicité universelle.

Maximilien Robespierre


Much of my attention this week has been on the unfolding civil rights calamity in the United States resulting from the Ferguson, Missouri decision not to prosecute police officer Darren Wilson. The popular will in America’s streets to stand up against this injustice has been a shining example of resistance to be emulated in other countries.

I have no grudge with Officer Wilson. Of greater significance, the popular unrest that occurred in response to the decision drew attention to the widely criticized use of grand juries, which are seen as a “rubber stamp” and have only ever served whatever purpose was decided already by the government.

Ironically, the failure to prosecute Wilson only further discredits the police and weakens their ability to do their job, as well as worsening their relations with the community. This leads me to the analysis of why the police are in a state of enmity with the public in locations such as Ferguson: illegitimacy.

The unrest has drawn attention to the total illegitimacy of police and security forces in many parts of the United States: something the US government can only be expected to ignore and dismiss repeatedly in the decades to come, maybe until its back is to the wall and it can’t even enforce the personal safety of regime officials in their own homes. If the law repeatedly fails to coincide with the wishes of the people, the law is illegitimate and the people are not at fault. This might make me sound like a bloodthirsty Jacobin, and that’s exactly why it is a basic tenet of modern liberal democracy: liberal democracy is Jacobin. The United States cannot expect to be perceived as a liberal democracy, and yet refuse to be governed by the will of the people and insist on unpopular manifestations of law enforcement.

One exercise that is useful is to compare the way the police and security forces react to civil unrest in the United States with the way they react in so-called autocratic states, namely countries like Ukraine (before the military dictatorship… I mean democracy… rode to power on the back of a tank) or Baathist-ruled Syria. In the latter, the state is greatly offended by even the mildest forms of protest. Negative depictions of the regime by journalists and bloggers result in persecution or detention, even torture. Acts of protest and civil disobedience are met with physical attacks by security forces almost immediately. In the United States, the regime uses a softer approach, but it is no less illegitimate and even worse for the overall survival chances of the regime. Theirs is a strategy of denial and withdrawal.

A city is struck by riots – as happened in Detroit in 1967 – or a natural disaster – as happened in New Orleans in 2005 – and the US government responds quite forcefully, but its forcefulness is limited. In the long term, the US government will not try to re-establish the respect that the authorities have lost from the public, or attempt to reconstruct community cohesion. Instead, they will withdraw or attempt to shirk responsibility, claiming that it is the responsibility of the more local state authorities. Less government spending will occur in the region affected, and there will also be flight of capital from the region (largely due to the damage to businesses in the rioting itself). Policing will continue, but in an increasingly adversarial fashion, treating impoverished and disaffected communities almost as if they are a foreign threat rather than a disenfranchised social stratum of American society itself.

We can predict that such a strategy of denial and withdrawal will take place in Missouri to a greater extent now, as the US government bitterly avoids picking up the pieces left by the disturbance. In shame, they will avoid confronting the hard truths of injustice and bad governance exposed by such rioting, fearful that trying to restore ordinary life would only pull out further threads from the fabric of the great America that so few are able to maintain faith in.

I would like to take a moment to clarify why I say the things I say, and to show that my critical view of the US regime and other so-called democracies is not hypocritical in view of more repressive states, but constructive for the cause of advancing both democracy and civilization itself. Because I don’t live under the jurisdiction of the Russian, Chinese or Iranian governments, I have no interest in changing their regime and no interest in undermining them. It is of no interest to me, one way or another, whether those regimes survive or not. That’s why I don’t bother to criticise them, and instead focus all my criticism on the United States.

The regime whose jurisdiction we live under in Britain is not our own, but the US regime. The US regime might not rule the whole world as it claims, but it does rule Britain. We can tell this by how effectively the US is able to leverage Britain’s (and Sweden’s) institutions to persecute its critics like Julian Assange, who is forced into exile at the Ecuadorian embassy here simply because the humiliated US leaders couldn’t stand the disclosures of diplomatic cables by WikiLeaks.

All regimes are illegitimate. I encourage everyone to undermine the regimes under which they live, and attempt to hold them to account. No regime should be above the judgment of the people, and regimes that pretend to rule by popular mandate are only all the more offensive to humanity than open dictatorships. No event would be more conducive to civilization than for the United States government’s institutions to fail and the regime to collapse completely, paving the way for ultimate freedom and anarchy. Such a transition to statelessness must be developed in the US before it occurs in any other state, for where else can Rome fall if not in Rome? It is my understanding that s0-called sociocultural evolution  in the United States filters through to Britain and Western Europe, so all alternative regimes and triumphs of peaceful statelessness must take their accelerated forms and manifest first in the United States. This is true whether we are talking about transcending the state through something as grand as Jacque Fresco’s Venus Project (pursued by the Zeitgeist Movement) or the Zero State’s VDP State, or simply the libertarian and anarchist visions of minimal or abolished state – all of whose values are carried among we, MONT bloggers.

The key to that turn of events is no single act of rioting or destruction in the US – no silver bullet. Instead, rioting and civil disobedience must be legitimized in the US, to forever expand the spaces that cannot be effectively governed in the United States and decrease the maneuvering room of the central government. Such steps pave the way for the eventual total collapse of all present norms of state in the world in favor of united and stateless order – something that is of maximum value to humanity if it first happens in the United States.

If it takes two more decades or three, evolution has selected America’s fate and the costs of that can now only be mitigated. The prices of withdrawal and ignorance in the face of injustice and lost social cohesion will be final destabilization and regime collapse, and we should welcome this change as part of our sociocultural development.

For more of my popular political commentary, I have collections of some rather more radical essays that can be easily downloaded and rated.


By Harry J. Bentham HJB Signature and stamp

NATO: casting a nuclear shadow over humanity, subverting peace in our time

posted by Harry J. Bentham

La politique, quand elle est un art et un service, non point une exploitation, c’est une action pour un idéal à travers des réalités.

Politics, when it is an art and a service, not an exploitation, is about acting for an ideal through realities.

Charles de Gaulle


At a time in history when there is said to be a “new” Cold War, it is not surprising that many people in Europe feel a need to side with Ukraine – portrayed as the victim of Russian aggression in every US and British mainstream media source from the center-left rightward.

Animated map: Note how NATO continued to expand after its raison d’etre, the Soviet Union, was gone. Reasons for this continued presence were flimsy, ranging from hypothetical missile threats in Iran to, now, “Russian aggression” in Ukraine.

The reason it has come to this restoration of the Cold War is the result of one organization: NATO. Even if everything they say about Russia’s aggression is true (all substantive evidence for this has been absent, over and over again) it does nothing to vindicate NATO’s responsibility for the current crisis and the reversion to cold hostility between east and west. NATO’s very raison d’etre is based on that hostility. NATO is based upon systematic, organized aggression and wars of conquest against regimes it considers to be “rogue”. This arrogance affects every one of us, and is reducing the chances of survival for civilization itself. It is pushing the world to the brink of nuclear war, knocking at the doors of sovereign states firmly outside the region this alliance was originally devised to protect.

Let’s consider this: If the Soviet Union hadn’t collapsed, how do you think they would have reacted to NATO expanding eastward to include western Germany and the Baltics? Worse, how would the USSR have reacted to NATO asserting claims to Crimea as an integral part of its own security area? Such madness would have provoked a nuclear war. None of us would be here to reflect on it. Even the craziest warmongers in the United States would not have disputed this outcome. Sadly, those hypothetical events really have taken place – only gradually. They may have happened over the course of years, but for Russia’s security concerns they might as well have happened in days.

In the year 2014, we have found NATO entrenching itself in territories it was never conceived to defend, even threatening the world with nuclear war over territories inessential to its own security like Lithuania and Latvia. It has become a reckless blackmailer intent on world conquest, pushing the “red lines” and bellicose security commitments deep into regions it should never have had any designs on. With every withdrawal of the Soviet nuclear threat in Europe, it appears that the NATO nuclear shadow has grown, leaving all of Europe at the mercy of the most brutal and relentless war machine ever to menace the international community.

I wish I was exaggerating, but I’m not. It would be false for me to say the United States wants the whole world join NATO, even if NATO is an apparatus for world conquest. In many ways, the NATO expansion and collision with Russia is a geopolitical accident. Less to do with encircling Russia, the true reason for the expansion was to recruit new NATO armies in eastern Europe to participate in American-led wars. This is a point that has been made quite resolutely by US social scientist Immanuel Wallerstein in a recent commentary, in which he lays the blame  for NATO expansion on the US disenchantment with its traditional allies in France and Germany. The US saw eastern European countries as more reliable recruits for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and so it tried to add these other countries to NATO.

The Baltics don’t have any reason to feel secure by joining NATO. NATO would never force the US to defend the Baltics against Russian “aggression” (which will never come), but it will force the Baltics to send human shields to bolster the US military in any further pointless wars in the Middle East.

The success of the Novorossiya rebellion in Eastern Ukraine isn’t just essential to Russia obtaining a buffer zone against NATO aggression and strategic nuclear realignments in Ukraine, but to the security of Europe itself. Peace is non-alignment, and the forces for peace in Ukraine are the forces for peace in Europe. Our very lives may depend on their ability to deter the regime patched together by Doctor Frankenstein and others from the US State Department in Kiev.

Get some of my best commentaries on world affairs in The Global Tyrant: Collected Foreign Policy Commentaries (2014), and, as always, look out for more of my analysis of international relations in the press.


By Harry J. Bentham HJB Signature and stamp

Amplifying your voice as a blogger: practical guidance

posted by Harry J. Bentham

L’accent est l’âme du discours.

Accent is the soul of language.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau


I am constantly looking for new ways to enhance the voices of fellow bloggers and make the web an even more anarchic and democratic place than it already is. With that in mind, I’d like to direct you to some of my recent work.

A significant part of my efforts has revolved around the construction of my own websites and blogs, to continue what others have so kindly enabled me to do. As well as this very blog, L’Ordre, hosted at Beliefnet, I have operated two newsletters called ClubOfINFO and Maquis Books. The former has been used to circulate politics, business, and technology news and analysis, and the latter has been used to circulate fiction stories and book promotions.

Recently, I have expanded the spectrum of newsletters I am operating to include, in recent days, CISpiritual, and, just today, CI Breaking. It may seem ambitious for me to endeavor to run all of these different newsletters, but it doesn’t require all that much effort. The platforms used are extremely quick and easy, and they consume only one day of my week to fill them with rich content.

To obtain the secrets of my personal online publishing success and apply them yourself, I have an incredibly useful Kindle booklet that won’t hurt your pocket to download. The booklet is short, succinct, substantive, and guaranteed to work for everyone from the humblest to the most ambitious bloggers. I encourage everyone to possess it as a manual. Evaluate it for yourself, and don’t forget to leave me your star rating on Amazon to direct other customers to its secrets.

Make Your Own Headlines (2014) via Amazon. For all my books, visit the full list here.


By Harry J. Bentham HJB Signature and stamp

The US provoked conflict in Europe to restore its “leadership” glory days

posted by Harry J. Bentham

On parle toujours mal quand on n’a rien à dire.

One always speaks badly when one has nothing to say.

Voltaire


As the G20 summit takes place in Australia, the agenda is meant to be economic growth, but the conflict in Ukraine is on many observers’ minds.

One of the most overlooked and yet important bits of information about current world politics is the geopolitical relationship between the United States and key European powers like Germany, France and Britain. Most commentators would like to tell us the Cold War-model alliance has returned or has been enhanced as a result of the Ukraine crisis. That makes it likely that the US is the main beneficiary of that crisis, and the primary actor covertly ensuring it continues. Russia gains nothing from prolonging the Ukraine crisis. The US gains everything.

The Americans most responsible for the Ukraine crisis, such as Victoria Nuland and other neoconservatives still influencing the US administration, have no friendly plans for Europe.

Europe does not gain from the anti-Russian sanctions, as I have already argued in a previous article at my column on Press TV. In that article, I rely partly on a candid analysis by Stratfor’s George Friedman talking about European energy dependence on Russia and a commentary from US social scientist Immanual Wallerstein. The latter explained how the US Republican war-hawks and neoconservative ideologues (who have recently enjoyed a triumph over the Democrats in the Senate) disapprove of the assertiveness of key European powers Germany and France. I would argue that Britain too has become less of a slave to the US in recent times, as shown by its unprecedented refusal to join the failed US coalition against the Syrian government in 2013 and the decreased appetite Brits have for wars – especially wars led by the US.

Before the Ukraine crisis, the US was doing very badly in the eyes of European powers. It had suffered a serious injury to its relations with the European powers over its spying on Germany and other states it claims to be allies. Snowden’s disclosures showed the US to be the primary enemy of freedom and democracy in the world – the very same values the US now pretends to be defending in its new Cold War with Russia. How ironic that the US regime’s exposure and public humiliation as barbaric unilateralists violating all of our rights on a truly global scale is the motivator of their new Cold crusade of “democracy” against Vladimir Putin.

The US spying on Germany, the seriousness of which is in no way reduced by the distraction of the Ukraine crisis, provoked outrage in what was called an unprecedented breach. The US wants to sustain its “leadership” of the Europeans for its global primacy, so it incessantly poked and provoked the Ukrainian crisis of 2014 and the entire specter of Russian “aggression” to diminish the role of the European Union and restore the old-fashioned role of NATO, led by the United States. It is the crisis caused by Edward Snowden’s revelations of the US betrayal of its allies through unilateral spying (Snowden’s asylum in Russia simply adds insult to that injury) that has led the desperate and dwindling United States regime to restore Cold War-style relations.

There is nothing alarming or aggressive about Russia’s concerned engagement in the Ukrainian crisis – a crisis started by the US regime as part of an anti-Russian crusade ever since the beginning of the so-called Euromaidan nationalist movement. The regime that pushed Ukraine to geopolitical crisis, and is seeking external threats and wars to hide its internal crisis, is the United States. We have reached a point at which the United States and its primacy in the world can only be preserved by creating and justifying armed conflict and perceived “threats” to keep people from examining the imperfection of their own society. This conflict started in Washington, DC, and there it will end.

I hope to write another article on the subject of the schism between US and European interests, and how that schism could deepen even more as a result of Republican war-hawks regaining much influence in the Senate.

If you are quick, you might still be able to download my fiction collection Red Skies while it is being offered free today.


By Harry J. Bentham HJB Signature and stamp

Previous Posts

All regimes are illegitimate: the day after America's End of History
By sealing our work with our blood, we may see at least the bright dawn of universal happiness. En scellant notre ouvrage de notre sang, nous puissions voir au moins briller l'aurore de la félicité universelle. Maximilien Robespierre Much of my attention this week has been on the

posted 11:00:25pm Nov. 28, 2014 | read full post »

NATO: casting a nuclear shadow over humanity, subverting peace in our time
La politique, quand elle est un art et un service, non point une exploitation, c'est une action pour un idéal à travers des réalités. Politics, when it is an art and a service, not an exploitation, is about acting for an ideal through realities. Charles de Gaulle At a time in history

posted 11:00:58pm Nov. 22, 2014 | read full post »

Amplifying your voice as a blogger: practical guidance
L'accent est l'âme du discours. Accent is the soul of language. Jean-Jacques Rousseau I am constantly looking for new ways to enhance the voices of fellow bloggers and make the web an even more anarchic and democratic place than it already is. With that in mind, I'd like to direct you to

posted 11:30:26pm Nov. 21, 2014 | read full post »

The US provoked conflict in Europe to restore its "leadership" glory days
On parle toujours mal quand on n'a rien à dire. One always speaks badly when one has nothing to say. Voltaire As the G20 summit takes place in Australia, the agenda is meant to be economic growth, but the conflict in Ukraine is on many observers' minds. One of the most overlooked and

posted 11:00:37pm Nov. 15, 2014 | read full post »

ISIS isn't Islamic, as the Lord's Resistance Army isn't Christian
Sans la logique, on a des opinions, on a pas de croyances. Without logic, we have opinions, we have no beliefs. Prosper-Olivier Lissagaray Above: Joseph Kony and top officers from his "Lord's Resistance Army". Would the Christians who think Islam is a violent religion first like to a

posted 11:00:15pm Nov. 14, 2014 | read full post »


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