Beginner's Heart

Beginner's Heart

time travel

via google

via google

Today over lunch, my husband & I went back in time. We don’t do that very often — it’s boring for other folks, and it’s just not really us. At least, not most of the time…

But today for some reason, it just came up. We got to talking about hotel rooms (we’ve stayed in a LOT), and how many I could recall well. As it turns out, you’d be surprised how many hotel rooms I remember.

One thing led to another – was that Outspan or the Mount Kenya Safari Club? which one had the fireplace in the room? was that in the Rift Vally or the Highlands? – and we were talking trips. To Africa, to Egypt, to Singapore & Bangkok. A train here, a cruise here. Other folks cam back from time worked overseas with pockets of loot. We came back w/ boxes of photographs, and memories we ought to revisit more often.

Outspan Hotel, Nyere, Kenya via Google

Outspan Hotel, Nyere, Kenya
via Google

Then the funniest thing happened this evening: a dear friend from that time turned up in my Facebook Inbox! Actually, she emailed me weeks ago, but I don’t check the ‘other’ Inbox on FB very often. But there it was — a note from the dear friend whose family was the other half of our ‘kiddy safari’ car in Africa.

Once upon a time, four couples rented two LandRovers in Nairobi, and went on a 3-week safari through Kenya, crossing into Tanzania at one point. Along w/ six kids, ranging in age from 2 to 10 or 11. The two families w/ the 3 oldest kids in one LandRover; the four of us — and usually the youngest child, the only girl — in ours. It was beyond fun.

Kenya is where a witchdoctor, throwing the bones, told me I was pregnant w/my 2nd son. Kenya is where I saw elephants moving so quietly they might have materialised from dreams. Kenya is where I fell in love with a landscape — the East African highlands — that I will almost certainly never see again.

Outspan at night via google

Outspan at night
via google

Kenya is where my husband and my friend’s husband caught fish off the coast, outside of Mombasa. Where we caught a train from Nairobi to get to the coastal hotel. Where I first heard of the man-eating lions now resting in grim splendor at the Field Museum in Chicago. But Outspan was where I left my heart, walking back down the colonnade in the chill indigo night to our room, where we had a fire against the chill. And the only pictures I can find are on the ‘net, or in my head.

My beloved & I often tell each other how very grateful we are for the many riches of our lives. But I gotta say — thumbing through my mental scrapbook of Kenya (and hearing from a dear old friend) certainly remind me once again how lucky I am.

I”m suggesting more regular time travel for all of us. Who knows who might call or email you from then? And what you might remember…?

 

where memories live

imageThis is the tag on my father’s blanket. The blanket he had long before I was born, probably bought before my mother reunited with him in the Phillipines, 13 months after they married.

It’s a softly worn (once scratchy) wool, something like the old Pendleton three-stripe blankets (and it has three black stripes). Years ago, it had a Christmas green hand-stitched binding. Now, it has a black binding, hand-stitched with love by my baby sister.

When my mother was in the hospital for several months, and we realised she would never be able to live w/out care again, we divvied up most of her things. She couldn’t take an entire houseful (a stuffed-to-the-windows house full!) to her new assisted living apartment. So my math whiz husband figured out a fair way for us to each (the four sisters) ‘bid’ on my mother’s things.

I realise this sounds macabre — or worse — to some folks. But we wanted to be fair, and there was no hope (given my mother’s Alzheimer’s and her physical fragility) that she would be able to live even with my 2nd sister, who had kept Mother for some time.

My mother’s life was as full of travel as my own — perhaps even more. Her house was full of memories: exotic carved chests and lacquered hangings; precious jewels (emeralds and rubies and gold and a LOT of silver); Thai silk and brocade; furniture and housewares and china and you can’t even imagine it all.Daddy with Buick

I bid on this old blanket. Not on emeralds, as my husband still teases me. Not on sterling flatware, or even a bronze tea set. But on my father’s old blanket. Because to me, it’s a tangible reminder of Daddy.

As a Buddhist, I try hard not to get too attached to ‘things.’ It’s just stuff, I used to tell my mother when she bemoaned a broken plate, a cracked vase. And watching as my husband refused to leave a war zone — just to ship stuff home! — almost did me in. NOTHING is worth a life.

But memories are odd creatures, and build nests in strange places. This blanket lay on Daddy’s bed sometimes, although my mother had beautiful linens. But this was Daddy’s special blanket (I still don’t know why), and it made every one of our many moves. Ending up (for me, at least), forgotten at my sister’s, who promised to rebind it. It made a move with her, as well — into her darling new duplex apartment.

And now it’s home, with me. I look at it, thrown over the sofa in the family room, and the room shifts: my father is sitting in another living room, and we’re talking about something. It doesn’t really matter what. For that priceless moment, I can see him, hear his voice, smell his distinctive aftershave&sweat&Stetson hat smell. That’s what I bid on. It just happens to live inside a soft, 70-year-old blanket. And I wouldn’t trade it for anything.

wildflowers, watermelon, and summer negligence

2014-07-18 18.28.51This is part of what I did today. Certainly the better part.

After an early morning — spent w/ a lawyer, not every my favourite thing to do — my sister called and needed help. She’d been left holding the bag (actually, 6 bags) for her HS reunion gig tonight, and hoped her big sis would help out.

Of course!

So I picked some flowers from the garden, she picked up Thai soup, and we got to work cutting up fruit for trays, and bread for cocktail sandwiches. And I did just fine until…the watermelon <cue solemn voice of foreboding>.

This next photo is NSF blood-phobes. I cut my finger w/ our verrry sharp new cleaver. You might say… I clove it. BIG slice into the finger and its poor nail. It’s like the WORST papercut. cut fingerStitches almost certainly won’t help, so I didn’t even bother.

Sigh. My sister was horrified — it bled alot. But it’s stopped that, and left this interesting pattern of honeycomb on the Bandaid that had nothing like that before it wrapped my finger.

You’ll be seeing shorter posts for a few days, I assure you. Typing is… iffy. Make that ouch-y.

I still feel like Isaac Bashevis Singer, though: if it hadn’t been this, who knows what it might have been? And it was great to see my sis! I blame the whole thing on the watermelon, personally.

we are NOT failures

 

via google

via google

A dear friend, in a recent conversation, told me that a mixup at her job was all her fault. It wasn’t (just FYI), but she’s been trained — as both a female and a good person — to accept responsibility for when things go wrong that she’s involved in.

Here’s the problem with that: sometimes, $#!+ happens.  And there’s nothing to do to plan for it, nothing to do to avoid it. Because it wasn’t your fault.

But so often, my friends — and not only my female friends, although we’re the worst — bow their shoulders and accept that burden.

I’m not advocating for flaky responsibility shirking, believe me. But I wonder when it became acceptable for top-level execs to shrug off responsibilities (I’m looking at America’s big companies, now), accept bonuses even when their companies are failing, and just go on. While my friends shoulder the blame (which is how it feels) for events unrelated to their own actions.

no fail

via google

How did things go so cockeyed?? What happened to lovingkindness? We certainly wouldn’t treat our friends like this!

My friend is not responsible for personalities, for instance. Some folks just don’t get along, so they won’t talk. You can’t make them. They don’t like each other — even if they don’t ‘dislike’ each other — and that means they are going to go out of their way to avoid communication. Is that MY fault? Or her fault? If adults don’t act like adults, are you responsible for that?

Me? I tend to give folks the benefit of the doubt. I assume you’re grown-up until you show me otherwise. So usually, something unpleasant-ish has to happen before I realise I will have to ‘manage’ you differently.

And that’s my point: we are NONE OF US ‘failures.’ Sure we ‘fail’ at activities, projects, events, whatever. But I see a homeless kid tackle an app to Harvard, a former drug addict put together a drug therapy program. My sister works at Goodwill Industries, where ‘failure’ is just not operative. Every day she could tell you a success story.

I’m just saying: quit beating yourself up, America. Except for those flaky execs, who could use a bit more mea culpa. And we could all use more lovingkindness.

Previous Posts

time and healing
I was reminded today healing happens, but it takes time. More than a week ago, I cut my finger pretty badly. I think the verb I used was 'clove,' since I whacked it w/ my brand-new cleaver. As you can se

posted 5:40:30pm Jul. 27, 2014 | read full post »

peace, love, and teaching our children
I often think that old hippies -- those of us who were in it for the peace & love, not the sex, drugs, rock&roll -- became teachers. Because that's what the teachers I know believe in: peace & love. P

posted 11:12:28pm Jul. 25, 2014 | read full post »

ritual and being our own best friends
So yes, I am the person who will make Việtnamese coffee w/ a stainless steel straw, bought specifically for the occasion. Because ritual rocks. Seriously: it offers us structure and space, time to sip a cold drink and pamper ourselves, as we would a loved one. A dear friend. Someone who needs a

posted 1:09:23pm Jul. 23, 2014 | read full post »

friendship, memory, and love
My mother-in-law has a friend! This may not sound like a big deal to many of you, but those of us w/ family in elder care KNOW it's bigger than it may sound. Nursing homes -- even good ones -- aren't conducive to happiness, sadly. My beloved mother-in-law was used to her own place, her own schedule

posted 1:18:07pm Jul. 22, 2014 | read full post »

time travel
Today over lunch, my husband & I went back in time. We don't do that very often -- it's boring for other folks, and it's just not really us. At least, not most of the time... But today for some reason, it jus

posted 9:07:23pm Jul. 20, 2014 | read full post »


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.