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Depression Help

Depression Help

The Girl With The Depression Tattoo

posted by tereziafarkas

girl with the depression tattoo | author | terezia farkas | depression help | beliefnet

Tattoos are conversation starters. That’s exactly what the girl with the depression tattoo is doing.

Bekah Miles suffers with depression. So why did the photo of Bekah Miles’ tattoo go viral and get featured on Fox news? It’s because of what the tattoo says about mental health. If you look at it from the front it says “I’m fine” but when Bekah looks at it, the tattoo says “Save me.”

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Rebekah “Bekah” Mile is a junior at George Fox University, in Newberg. Bekah got the tattoo symbolizing her struggle with depression and posted about it on Facebook on Sunday, Aug. 23 to raise awareness of the mental disorder. Since then, the post has gone viral— garnering over 324,000 shares, 398,000 likes and 37,000 comments as of Tuesday morning.

The Girl With The Depression Tattoo

 by Bekah Miles

(Dear mom and dad, please don’t kill me over this permanent choice. I want you to hear me out.)

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Today, I am coming out with something that only few of you know. I am ready to have a conversation about my mental illness.

Last year, I was diagnosed with depression. And in all honesty, I believe it was a problem for quite a while before that, but I think it just got worse to the point of hardly functioning.

So today, I got this tattoo. I feel that my leg was the best place for the meaning behind it. When everyone else sees it, they see “I’m fine,” but from my viewpoint, it reads “save me.” To me, it means that others see this person that seems okay, but, in reality, is not okay at all. It reminds me that people who may appear happy, may be at battle with themselves.

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To me, depression is the days that I feel sad for no reason.

Depression is the mornings that I don’t feel capable of getting out of bed.

Depression is the sleeping too much, or sleeping too little.

Depression is the homework that I never completed, simply because I didn’t feel like I was capable.

Depression is the break downs I have over absolutely nothing.

Depression is the eating too much, or eating too little.

Depression is the nights I begin to cry because I feel so overwhelmed, even though everything is going right.

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Depression is the 50 pounds I carry in my chest at all times.

Depression is the need to constantly be distracted (being on social media, playing video games, watching movies or shows, or working all the time) because I can’t trust myself with my thoughts for longer than 3 minutes.

Depression is the friendships that have suffered because of my inability to function.

Depression is the hurtful thoughts and actions I have towards myself.

Depression is the tears I have because I don’t know why I feel so worthless, when I know I should feel happy.

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This is one of the most difficult things to open up about because it’s extremely hard for me to feel vulnerable…but this needs to be talked about. Mental illness is serious, but so shamed in our society. We care so much for our physical health, but hardly a thing about our mental state. And that is seriously messed up. Mental illness is not a choice and will likely hit everyone at some point in their life. If it’s such a huge issue, why aren’t we having this conversation about it?

That’s why I got this tattoo; they are great conversation starters. This forces me to talk about my own struggle, and why the awareness of it is important. You’d be surprised by how many people YOU know that struggle with depression, anxiety, or other mental illness. I may only be one person, but one can save another…and that’s all I could really ask for.

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Maybe this is part of why I am so interested in psychology. I want to help people who feel the way I have—and still do—because it’s hell. And I don’t wish that upon anyone.

“I think the saddest people always try their hardest to make people happy because they know what it’s like to feel absolutely worthless and they don’t want anyone else to feel like that.” —Robin Williams

**Also, THANK YOU to the ones who have helped me in this battle. I would not be where I am without you.**

Twitter: #depression #mentalhealth @tereziafarkas

*Click here to read more about Terezia Farkas and Depression Help.

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Canadians Living With Chronic Illness Wanted

posted by tereziafarkas

Self Injury | Parents| Guardians| Guide |Depression Help | Terezia Farkas | author |writer |Beliefnet

McGill University needs Canadians help. McGill wants people living with chronic illness to participate in a national online survey. McGill is especially interested in people with mood disorders (depression, anxiety, etc.)

McGill’s research team (patients, healthcare providers, researchers and policy makers) is exploring new ways to help people living with chronic illness. At this time, the survey is limited to Canadian residents. So if you know a Canadian who is suffering with chronic illness, please pass this information along.

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Chronic illness brings with it depression, anxiety, and a whole lot of other mood issues. McGill researchers are asking chronic illness sufferers for input about things researchers should consider by completing an online survey. Completing the survey take 10-15 minutes. The survey is completely anonymous.

Thank you for helping the McGill team work together to improve the lives of people with chronic illness. The English survey is available at:

http://fluidsurveys.com/surveys/sylvielambert/living-well-with-a-chronic-illness/  .  

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The French survey is available at: https://cusm.ca/newsroom/article/vivre-avec-maladie-chronique-au-canada-partagez-votre-opinion

If you would like to get involved, or would like to do this by phone, contact the project coordinatorManon de Raad at 514 345 3511 ext 3074 or manon.deraad@ssss.gouv.qc.ca.  Visit http://www.mcgill.ca/cansmart/ for more information and to see a summary of survey results. If you have questions about your rights as a research participant, contact a patient representative at 514-345-3511 at ext 3301.

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Pour obtenir de plus amples informations concernant ce projet ou si vous désirez y participer, veuillez communiquer avec Manon de Raad, coordonnatrice du projet (au Centre de Recherche de St. Mary, à Montréal) au 514 345-3511, poste 3074 or manon.deraad@ssss.gouv.qc.ca. Pour obtenir de plus amples informations concernant ce projet ou si vous désirez y participer, veuillez communiquer avec Manon de Raad, coordonnatrice du projet. Téléphone : 514 345-3511514 345-3511, poste 3074, manon.deraad@ssss.gouv.qc.ca. Vous pouvez visiter le www.mcgill.ca/cansmart pour plus de détails et pour lire un résumé des résultats de l’étude. Pour toute question concernant vos droits en tant que participant à ce projet de recherche, veuillez communiquer avec un des représentants des patients au 514 345-3511, poste 3301.

Twitter: #depression  #chronicillness @tereziafarkas

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Global Suicide Rates

posted by tereziafarkas

global suicide rates | WHO | author | terezia farkas | depression help

Globally, each year the number of lives lost by suicide is more than the number of deaths from homicide and war combined. Every stat is a person. Here are some stunning global suicide rates.

  • Every year, over 800,000 people die from suicide; this is roughly one death every 40 seconds.
  • Suicide is the fifth leading causes of death among those aged 30-49 years.
  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death in the 15-29 years age group.
  • Overall, it is estimated that for every adult who dies of suicide there are over 20 others who will make a suicide attempt.

The psychological pain that makes a person take his or her life is unimaginable. Suicide is sometimes the only release from pain the person sees. Suicide is complex. It involves psychological, social, biological, cultural and environmental factors. One can never assume that only one factor caused the person to choose suicide. 

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  • In 2012, suicide accounted for 1.4% of all deaths worldwide, making it the 15th leading cause of death.
  • Mental disorders (particularly depression and alcohol use disorders) are a major risk factor for suicide in Europe and North America; however, in Asian countries impulsiveness plays an important role.

Connectedness is crucial to individuals who may be vulnerable to suicide. Studies have shown that social isolation can increase the risk of suicide. The more isolated one feels, the more appeal suicide may have. Strong human bonds can be protective against suicide. Reaching out to someone who has become disconnected from others and offering the person support and friendship may be a life-saving act.

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  • The WHO World Suicide Report “Preventing Suicide: A global imperative” follows the adoption of the Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 by the World Health Assembly.  The target is to reduce the rate of suicide in countries by 10% by 2020.
  • The World Suicide Report “Preventing Suicide: A global imperative” is the most comprehensive, up-to-date record of the current status of suicide prevention internationally.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has an interactive map on suicide rates in all countries. The interactive map looks at the number of men vs the number of women who suicide. 60 countries have good reporting methods on suicide. Other countries may not count suicides in their stats because of cultural taboos or being illegal. Only 28 countries have a national strategy for suicide prevention.

Every suicide stat is a person. Let’s help reduce suicide stats and save some lives! For more information, visit WHO suicide prevention.

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Predicting Suicide Risk With Apps and Blood Test

posted by tereziafarkas

predicting suicide risk | blood test | app| depression | terezia farkas | author | beliefnet

 

Imagine predicting suicide risk with apps and blood test. According to the Washington Post, it is possible. Scientists have developed a system of blood tests and apps that can 90% predict if someone will start thinking about suicide or attempt it.

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A study published by researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine took a look at two apps. One app measures mood and anxiety. The other app asks questions about life experiences and situations. For example, some of the questions the apps ask are: How high is your physical energy and the amount of moving about that you feel like doing right now? How good to you feel about yourself and your accomplishments right now? How uncertain about things do you feel right now?

The researchers avoided asking questions about suicide directly. Writing in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, the researchers said that “predicting suicidal behaviour in individuals is one of the hard problems in psychiatry, and in society at large.”

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“One cannot always ask individuals if they are suicidal, as desire not to be stopped or future impulsive changes of mind may make their self-report of feelings, thoughts and plans to be unreliable,” Alexander B. Niculescu III, a professor of psychiatry and medical neuroscience at Indiana University, and his co-authors wrote. (Molecular Psychiatry)

For the blood test, researchers looked at special RNA biomarkers. These RNA biomarkers seem to predict suicidal thinking. In other words, if the biomarkers are there, the probability of suicidal thinking increases in the person.

Researchers did the blood test on a group of 217 men. The men were suffering from bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia. About 20 percent went from no suicidal thoughts to a high level of suicidal thoughts while they were being seen at a clinic at the university. Those men all had the RNA biomarkers that predict suicidal thinking.

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Dr. Niculescu believes the apps are ready to be used in the real world, especially in emergency departments. The apps can easily be used with mobile devices. Testing of RNA biomarkers is something that will be possible in the near future, but for now is too costly for most hospitals.

There are two problems with this study. One, the subjects were all men. Women are just starting to be studied. Two, subjects all had some type of mental illness. Would the apps and blood test work on people who haven’t yet been diagnosed? In other words, can the tests predict if a person will get depressed in the future?

It’s certainly positive news that researchers are trying to find ways to predict suicide risk in a person as a type of suicide prevention.

Twitter: #depression #anxietyproblems #bipolar @tereziafarkas

Previous Posts

The Girl With The Depression Tattoo
Tattoos are conversation starters. That's exactly what the girl with the depression tattoo is doing. Bekah Miles suffers with depression. So why did the photo of Bekah Miles' tattoo go viral and get featured on Fox news? It's because of what ...

posted 6:28:36am Sep. 03, 2015 | read full post »

Canadians Living With Chronic Illness Wanted
McGill University needs Canadians help. McGill wants people living with chronic illness to participate in a national online survey. McGill is especially interested in people with mood disorders (depression, anxiety, etc.) McGill’s research ...

posted 8:31:16pm Sep. 01, 2015 | read full post »

Global Suicide Rates
Globally, each year the number of lives lost by suicide is more than the number of deaths from homicide and war combined. Every stat is a person. Here are some stunning global suicide rates. Every year, over 800,000 people die from suicide; ...

posted 11:36:18pm Aug. 27, 2015 | read full post »

Predicting Suicide Risk With Apps and Blood Test
  Imagine predicting suicide risk with apps and blood test. According to the Washington Post, it is possible. Scientists have developed a system of blood tests and apps that can 90% predict if someone will start thinking about suicide ...

posted 6:09:59am Aug. 25, 2015 | read full post »

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