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Depression Help

Depression Help

Global Suicide Rates

posted by tereziafarkas

global suicide rates | WHO | author | terezia farkas | depression help

Globally, each year the number of lives lost by suicide is more than the number of deaths from homicide and war combined. Every stat is a person. Here are some stunning global suicide rates.

  • Every year, over 800,000 people die from suicide; this is roughly one death every 40 seconds.
  • Suicide is the fifth leading causes of death among those aged 30-49 years.
  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death in the 15-29 years age group.
  • Overall, it is estimated that for every adult who dies of suicide there are over 20 others who will make a suicide attempt.

The psychological pain that makes a person take his or her life is unimaginable. Suicide is sometimes the only release from pain the person sees. Suicide is complex. It involves psychological, social, biological, cultural and environmental factors. One can never assume that only one factor caused the person to choose suicide. 

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  • In 2012, suicide accounted for 1.4% of all deaths worldwide, making it the 15th leading cause of death.
  • Mental disorders (particularly depression and alcohol use disorders) are a major risk factor for suicide in Europe and North America; however, in Asian countries impulsiveness plays an important role.

Connectedness is crucial to individuals who may be vulnerable to suicide. Studies have shown that social isolation can increase the risk of suicide. The more isolated one feels, the more appeal suicide may have. Strong human bonds can be protective against suicide. Reaching out to someone who has become disconnected from others and offering the person support and friendship may be a life-saving act.

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  • The WHO World Suicide Report “Preventing Suicide: A global imperative” follows the adoption of the Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 by the World Health Assembly.  The target is to reduce the rate of suicide in countries by 10% by 2020.
  • The World Suicide Report “Preventing Suicide: A global imperative” is the most comprehensive, up-to-date record of the current status of suicide prevention internationally.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has an interactive map on suicide rates in all countries. The interactive map looks at the number of men vs the number of women who suicide. 60 countries have good reporting methods on suicide. Other countries may not count suicides in their stats because of cultural taboos or being illegal. Only 28 countries have a national strategy for suicide prevention.

Every suicide stat is a person. Let’s help reduce suicide stats and save some lives! For more information, visit WHO suicide prevention.

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Predicting Suicide Risk With Apps and Blood Test

posted by tereziafarkas

predicting suicide risk | blood test | app| depression | terezia farkas | author | beliefnet

 

Imagine predicting suicide risk with apps and blood test. According to the Washington Post, it is possible. Scientists have developed a system of blood tests and apps that can 90% predict if someone will start thinking about suicide or attempt it.

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A study published by researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine took a look at two apps. One app measures mood and anxiety. The other app asks questions about life experiences and situations. For example, some of the questions the apps ask are: How high is your physical energy and the amount of moving about that you feel like doing right now? How good to you feel about yourself and your accomplishments right now? How uncertain about things do you feel right now?

The researchers avoided asking questions about suicide directly. Writing in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, the researchers said that “predicting suicidal behaviour in individuals is one of the hard problems in psychiatry, and in society at large.”

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“One cannot always ask individuals if they are suicidal, as desire not to be stopped or future impulsive changes of mind may make their self-report of feelings, thoughts and plans to be unreliable,” Alexander B. Niculescu III, a professor of psychiatry and medical neuroscience at Indiana University, and his co-authors wrote. (Molecular Psychiatry)

For the blood test, researchers looked at special RNA biomarkers. These RNA biomarkers seem to predict suicidal thinking. In other words, if the biomarkers are there, the probability of suicidal thinking increases in the person.

Researchers did the blood test on a group of 217 men. The men were suffering from bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia. About 20 percent went from no suicidal thoughts to a high level of suicidal thoughts while they were being seen at a clinic at the university. Those men all had the RNA biomarkers that predict suicidal thinking.

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Dr. Niculescu believes the apps are ready to be used in the real world, especially in emergency departments. The apps can easily be used with mobile devices. Testing of RNA biomarkers is something that will be possible in the near future, but for now is too costly for most hospitals.

There are two problems with this study. One, the subjects were all men. Women are just starting to be studied. Two, subjects all had some type of mental illness. Would the apps and blood test work on people who haven’t yet been diagnosed? In other words, can the tests predict if a person will get depressed in the future?

It’s certainly positive news that researchers are trying to find ways to predict suicide risk in a person as a type of suicide prevention.

Twitter: #depression #anxietyproblems #bipolar @tereziafarkas

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OCD Helpguide

posted by tereziafarkas

OCD Helpguide | author | terezia farkas | depression help

 

OCD Helpguide: Columbia University Pediatric Anxiety and Mood Research Clinic offers free screens for OCD. They can be reached in the United States at 646-774-5793.

What is OCD? Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental disorder where people feel the need to check things repeatedly, have certain recurring unwanted thoughts (obsessions), or repetitive behaviour. Some examples are hand washing and checking doors to see if they are locked.

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A typical OCD cycle goes something like this: Obsession (is the door locked?) ⇒ Anxiety (I’m worried the door isn’t locked) ⇒ Compulsion (checking the door to make sure it’s locked) ⇒ Relief (the door is locked) ⇒ Obsession (maybe the door isn’t properly locked)

OCD activities can take up more than one hour per behaviour. Checking the door for an hour to make sure it’s locked may sound silly to you. But to an OCD person the anxiety associated with the possibility of an unlocked door makes NOT checking the door unbearable. The person realizes the behaviour doesn’t make sense and is unhappy with the obsession. OCD has an increased risk of suicide.

Treatment of OCD includes behavioural therapy, cognitive therapy, and medications. OCD is not preventable, but it is treatable. OCD occurs in adults and children. Men and women are affected in equal numbers, so OCD isn’t gender related.

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Columbia University Pediatric Anxiety and Mood Research Clinic offers free screening for suspected OCD. They have a clinic for adults and children. For more information, visit the links below:

Pediatric Anxiety and Mood Research Clinic

www.columbiapsychiatry.org/pamrc

Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1UTczZp

Twitter: http://bit.ly/1TTBgIa

Center for OCD and Related Disorders

www.columbia-ocd.org

www.ocdtreatmentstudy.com

 

Twitter: #OCD #anxiety @tereziafarkas

* Click here to read more about Terezia Farkas and Depression Help.

 

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Free CDRIN Online Training Brings Together LE and Research

posted by tereziafarkas

CDRIN | Training | Lived Experience | Depression | author | Terezia Farkas

A Free CDRIN online training prepares people with lived experience (depression, bipolar, social anxiety) to participate on research teams and help clinical researchers.

MDSC, MHCC, IMHR, and  over 50 research and community organizations through our partnerships within the Canadian Depression  Research and Intervention Network (CDRIN) are proud to offer free CDRIN online training on research processes for persons who have or are experiencing mental health issues, and their caregivers. This exceptional program will provide a very solid understanding of research and will support people efforts in becoming involved in research efforts. Developed with and for persons with Lived Experience in partnership with the research community, the program has received significantly positive reviews. 

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 To take this online program please visit http://cdrin.org/lived-experience/  

I took this CDRIN course a while back. It was amazing! First of all, I could be completely open about my experiences with depression because everyone else there knew what I was talking about. I never felt that comfortable even in group therapy. Second, there were people who were mental health advocates. It was a great chance to network. Many of the people I met I still keep in regular contact both on a personal and professional level. Third, it is simple, easy, and extremely helpful. You connect with researchers and mental health professionals who need your input.

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The CDRIN training program is delivered entirely online. It’s a series of 8 sequential e-learning modules. You are able to complete the e-learning materials at your own pace and on your own schedule, while still able to interact with other learners in the program.

The objective of this education is to build respect for yourselves and your potential contributions to depression research. It’s also designed to let you have some FUN!

So take the opportunity to have your voice on depression heard by a large, caring audience. Please pass this information along to someone you think might benefit or want to get involved in depression research from a lived experience point of view.

Twitter: @CDRINorg #mentalhealth #anxietyproblems #depression @tereziafarkas

* Click here to find out more about Terezia Farkas and her Depression help and click here to follow Terezia on Twitter.

Previous Posts

Global Suicide Rates
Globally, each year the number of lives lost by suicide is more than the number of deaths from homicide and war combined. Every stat is a person. Here are some stunning global suicide rates. Every year, over 800,000 people die from suicide; ...

posted 11:36:18pm Aug. 27, 2015 | read full post »

Predicting Suicide Risk With Apps and Blood Test
  Imagine predicting suicide risk with apps and blood test. According to the Washington Post, it is possible. Scientists have developed a system of blood tests and apps that can 90% predict if someone will start thinking about suicide ...

posted 6:09:59am Aug. 25, 2015 | read full post »

OCD Helpguide
  OCD Helpguide: Columbia University Pediatric Anxiety and Mood Research Clinic offers free screens for OCD. They can be reached in the United States at 646-774-5793. What is OCD? Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental ...

posted 9:03:13am Aug. 20, 2015 | read full post »

Free CDRIN Online Training Brings Together LE and Research
A Free CDRIN online training prepares people with lived experience (depression, bipolar, social anxiety) to participate on research teams and help clinical researchers. MDSC, MHCC, IMHR, and  over 50 research and community organizations ...

posted 6:17:08pm Aug. 18, 2015 | read full post »

Why Don't People Who Are Suicidal Seek Help?
Why don't people who are suicidal seek help when in crisis? It's a good question. One group of people who usually won't ask for help are men. There are several reasons of course, but it all boils down to stigma. Stigma keeps men silent. This ...

posted 7:09:48pm Aug. 12, 2015 | read full post »

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