Depression Help

Depression Help

4 Main Types Of Anxiety Disorders In The U.S.

posted by tereziafarkas

c3

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults in the United States age 18 and older (18% of U.S. population). (Anxiety and Depression Association of America)  

Anxiety disorders are real and serious. Worry and fear are constant and overwhelming. People dealing with depression often suffer from anxiety disorders. The reverse is also true. Understanding anxiety disorders can help you deal with depression. What are 4 main types of anxiety disorders in the United States?

  1. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). This affects about 3% of the U.S. population. GAD is where you worry for no apparent reason. You expect the worst no matter what the situation or how good your day is going. It’s that impending sense of doom over the horizon. Even getting out of bed and thinking about your day will create anxiety. You can’t stop worrying though you know everything is okay. Anxiety is out of your control. When anxiety is mild, you can function fairly well as long as you avoid situations that trigger anxiety. When anxiety is severe, it’s almost impossible to function normally.
  2. Panic Disorder. This anxiety disorder affects about 2.7% of the U.S. population. It’s usually called panic attacks. Panic attacks happen randomly, sometimes even while you sleep. You start worrying about when the next panic attack will happen, which adds to your overall anxiety. Panic disorder often comes with depression. The good news is panic disorders are easily treated. You can learn to control it or in some cases it can even disappear.
  3. Social Anxiety Disorder. This affects 6.8% of the U.S. population. This is an extreme fear of being judged by others socially or in other situations. It’s not the same as being shy which people often mistake it for. A person with social anxiety disorder knows the fear is unreasonable or too much, but can’t control the level of fear that’s felt. You feel powerless, alone, and even ashamed because you fear you will humiliate or embarrass yourself in public. Cognitive therapy can treat social anxiety disorder.
  4. Specific Phobias. This anxiety disorder affects 8.7% of the U.S. population. PTSD is sometimes ranked in with specific phobias. These phobias can start in childhood or can come about suddenly. It’s caused by a bad or traumatic experience. You know your fear is irrational but you can’t control it and you become extremely anxious. Specific phobias are treatable using Pavlovian conditioning and cognitive therapy.

 

Terezia Farkas. International Bestselling Author, Huffington Post/ CNN contributor, columnist of Depression Help. Focus is mental health. Her bestseller Heart of Love Evolution – Surviving Depression is available on Amazon. Website:  www.tereziafarkas.com Follow on  Twitter.

How To Cleanse An Area Of Negative People’s Energy: Depression Help

posted by tereziafarkas

c2

Your aura and the psychic space around you need cleaning too. Just like anything else, it can get ‘dirty’, only it gets dirty from the energies of negative people. Usually we ignore this personal space. But it needs the occasional cleaning. If you deal with negative people frequently, you might want to purify your space of negative energies more often. Here’s how to cleanse an area of negative people’s energy.

  1. Burn incense. Sandalwood and Frankincense are aromatics and have been used for centuries to relieve stress and despair. That’s useful when you have to deal with negative people. There are perfumes that have Sandalwood and Frankincense gently mixed in, so if your boss or co-worker is a negative person you can easily keep your psychic space clean without using incense sticks.
  2. Open all windows. Let the sunshine and fresh air in. You might be surprised at how stuffy and hot the air will become around negative people. Anger and heated conversations make body temperature rise which in turn warms the air. Not to mention odours lingering from alcohol or cigarettes or even bad B.O.
  3. Spray the area with salt water from a sprayer. Salt purifies the air. All you need is a tablespoon or so of salt mixed with a cup of water. Basically you’re making holy water like the Catholic Church so add in a powerful prayer like the Our Father and it becomes the same thing.
  4. Essential oils. The aromatic scents lighten your mood and refresh your home or workplace naturally. Essential oils are antibacterial and antiviral so they make your home or workplace healthier. Ones to try are lemon, sweet orange, lavender, sage, peppermint, and rose. Mix a few drops of any of these oils with water and use as a spray.
  5. Loud clapping. I’m not too sure about this idea but Pranic healing recommends the use of loud, purposeful noise to cleanse an are of negative people’s energy. The idea is rooted in the movement of air particles. Clapping makes negative particles move away from positive particles so you are restoring balance to the ions in the air.

 

Terezia Farkas. International Bestselling Author, Huffington Post/ CNN contributor, columnist of Depression Help. Focus is mental health. Her bestseller Heart of Love Evolution – Surviving Depression is available on Amazon. Website:  www.tereziafarkas.com Follow on  Twitter.

How To Deal With Negative People

posted by tereziafarkas

Battery-negative-positive

Negative people. They exist everywhere. If you’re like me, you try to ignore them or at the best, tolerate the behaviour. But negative attitude can really wear thin during the Christmas season. Bah humbug – if it isn’t your style, it will really annoy the crap out of you. How do you deal with negative people?

According to Raj Raghunathan, Ph.D. one obvious solution to dealing with negative people is to ignore them. Walk away. If you can. That’s right out of the fight or flee book of survival. But it’s really hard to walk away from a family member, spouse, friend, co-worker or boss. I mean, you can do it but the fallout can be nuclear, with radioactive anger spewing over others. Then your Christmas gets a whole lot worse because everyone is now angry about something.

Raghunathan’s second approach seems less destructive. A practical way to deal with negative people is by understanding the reasons for their negativity. “In brief, almost all negativity has its roots in one of three deep-seated fears: the fear of being disrespected by others, the fear of not being loved by others, and the fear that “bad things” are going to happen. These fears feed off each other to fuel the belief that “the world is a dangerous place and people are generally mean.” (Psychology Today, March 19, 2013)

Bad childhood, parents or other reasons can cause deep-rooted issues of anxiety, anger and fear. I don’t recommend being a psychotherapist, unless you’re one already and want to spend your Christmas analyzing friends or family. Instead, practice understanding and only be responsible for your actions.

Practice understanding means you see the good and the bad in the person equally. You recognize what makes the person grumpy or what sets him/her off. You’re not going to change the behaviour or attitude overnight, so don’t even try. Understanding what a person is about doesn’t mean he/she has the right to walk all over you. It simply means you get where all that cynicism, sarcasm, nitpicking behaviour sprouts from.

Being responsible for your actions means just that. You aren’t responsible for how the other person feels. It’s not you who is miserable or sees the bad in everything. Instead of trying to change the person’s attitude, focus on yourself and how you want to feel. Do things that will make you feel good even if it means taking time out from your miserable person. Be responsible for bringing joy to yourself and take responsibility of your actions. Don’t blame the negative person for going on ski trips if skiing makes you happy. It’s your choice so take responsibility for your action.

Terezia Farkas is an International Bestselling Author, Huffington Post and CNN contributor, and columnist of Depression Help. Her bestseller Heart of Love Evolution – Surviving Depression is available on Amazon. Her website is atwww.tereziafarkas.com Follow her on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

6 Tips For Dealing With Depression During The Holidays

posted by tereziafarkas

a1

Holidays are a special time of year for many reasons. For some people however the Holiday season is a time when depression hits hardest. This may be the result of anxiety, stress or increased responsibility. For many the primary cause of depression is loneliness. Here are 6 tips to help you during the holiday season.

1. Connect. Call over friends. One will do fine, because the goal is for you to have supportive, non-judgemental support. Talk to your neighbour. You’ll be surprised that a neighbour can become a close friend. Even pets stave off loneliness. If depression starts feeling severe, seek professional support.

2. No Shame. We’re scared of what people will think about us. Stigma keeps us from talking with others about what hurts. Don’t be embarrassed. Depression isn’t just a mental disease, it’s a whole body illness like cancer. Depression affects 1 in 4 so chances are someone you know also suffers with depression.

3. Expect the Bad, Accept the Good. Expect bad emotional days. Accept any day or moment that’s good. If you usually cry every morning or don’t feel like getting up, accept that’s how you’ll be during the holidays. But don’t expect that’s how the rest of the day will go. Life can feel good so enjoy those moments and let yourself feel happy.

4. Avoid Family Drama. People don’t change who they are overnight. Nor will they suddenly love you or want to be your friend. Family drama only diminishes your self-esteem, isolates you, and leaves you feeling more alone than before. Be realistic and know that others are bringing personal baggage to the party.

5. You First. Need alone time? Take it! Be gentle with yourself. Treat yourself first. Give yourself permission to feel miserable or to cry. Accept practical help when offered. You don’t have to do everything yourself. Let others lift some of the load off your shoulders.

6. Grieve. Grief shouldn’t be hidden. Discuss with others the triggers that upset you or conversations that offend you. Let them know its okay to say the name of the deceased. Honour your loved one by doing things you did together or set an extra seat at the table.

Previous Posts

4 Main Types Of Anxiety Disorders In The U.S.
Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults in the United States age 18 and older (18% of U.S. population). (Anxiety and Depression Association of America)   Anxiety disorders are real and serious. Worry and fear are constant and overwhelming. Peo

posted 8:49:08pm Dec. 19, 2014 | read full post »

How To Cleanse An Area Of Negative People's Energy: Depression Help
Your aura and the psychic space around you need cleaning too. Just like anything else, it can get ‘dirty’, only it gets dirty from the energies of negative people. Usually we ignore this personal space. But it needs the occasional cleaning. If you deal with negative people frequently, you might

posted 7:48:05pm Dec. 16, 2014 | read full post »

How To Deal With Negative People
Negative people. They exist everywhere. If you’re like me, you try to ignore them or at the best, tolerate the behaviour. But negative attitude can really wear thin during the Christmas season. Bah humbug - if it isn’t your style, it will really annoy the crap out of you. How do you deal with ne

posted 8:00:29pm Dec. 15, 2014 | read full post »

6 Tips For Dealing With Depression During The Holidays
Holidays are a special time of year for many reasons. For some people however the Holiday season is a time when depression hits hardest. This may be the result of anxiety, stress or increased responsibility. For many the primary cause of depression is loneliness. Here are 6 tips to help you during t

posted 9:11:17pm Dec. 09, 2014 | read full post »

Youth Depression and Self-Harm - Erin's Story
Erin Farkas (no relation) is a smart, articulate young woman with a simple goal. She wants to help other young people who are fighting depression. In 2014, Erin posted a Youtube video talking about her struggles with anxiety, depression, self-harm and bullying. “It’s taken me a long time to get

posted 7:28:25pm Dec. 04, 2014 | read full post »


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.