Ending Self-Sabotage

Ending Self-Sabotage

Six Psychological Secrets to Weight Loss, Based on Scientific Studies

posted by mbundrant

weight loss

Image source

How many times have you followed some popular diet to the letter, then wondered why it didn’t work, or why you couldn’t stay with it?

What most people don’t know is this: successful weight loss depends on more than just eating or not eating foods on a list! Losing weight involves some mental and psychological factors as well, and those are the real keys to dieting and weight loss! Here are some studies that tell you what you need to know to achieve your goals and develop your personal potential.

1. Know yourself

Many people have the habit of eating “mindlessly,” that is, without thinking about why they’re eating, or whether or not they’re even hungry. A study by the American Medical Association found that people who developed their ability to tune in to their emotions lost more weight than those who didn’t.  What about you: do you know why you’re eating that chocolate mousse?

2. Develop a positive self-image

Sometimes dieting is a response to a perception of yourself of being “fat,” when you really aren’t, and even if you are, don’t worry about it, you’re a great person! You look in the mirror, you aren’t happy with what you see, and you try to address those negative feelings with weight loss – or sometimes eating – and it just doesn’t work. A study at the University of Minnesota found that out of 2,000 women dieters, 72% were not even overweight; they just perceived themselves that way!

3. Work on the total package

Don’t just focus on weight loss; make it part of an overall program of personal growth.  Research by the Society for Public Health Education found that people who included a weight loss diet in a general program of improving self-image and mood, nutrition education, exercise participation, etc. were more successful at losing weight than those who focused simply on “calories.”

4. Set short term goals

Of course your long term goal is to lose 80 pounds, but if you’re too focused on that, it can work against you, simply because it can take so long to get there, you lose your motivation to continue. Weight loss expert Malie Frey states, “you need to experience more frequent rewards in the form of achievable short term goals.” For example,  “I will eat a salad without cheese for lunch every day this week,” instead of sitting there frowning and muttering, “I will lose 80 pounds… I will lose 80 pounds.”

5. Reward yourself

The American Psychological Association found that people who were motivated by rewards and by support from themselves and others were more successful in their weight loss efforts. When you lose 10 pounds, reward yourself!  Buy that spiffy new shirt you saw at the mall!

6. Don’t worry, be happy

Probably more people eat because of stress than for any other reason. Try to reduce stressors in your life and learn to slow down and relax. A major JAND study found greatly increased eating control among subjects who completed relaxation training.

 

41jP7lVWsxL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-v3-big,TopRight,0,-55_SX278_SY278_PIkin4,BottomRight,1,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_Mike Bundrant is author of the book Your Achilles Eel: Discover and Overcome the Hidden Cause of Negative Emotions, Bad Decisions and Self-Sabotage.

Mike also leads the AHA Online Weight Loss Coaching Group.

 

3 Signs That Your Inner Critic is Winning

posted by mbundrant

inner criticOn your path of spiritual growth, it’s important to know what you’re up against.

A nearly universal obstacle to inner peace and productivity is the inner critic. The inner critic doesn’t care who you are or what you have done. It is only interested in tearing you down. When you make a mistake, it criticizes you. When you succeed, it criticizes. When you’re doing nothing at all, it criticizes you!

If you recognize the symptoms of the inner critic, you’ll know the cause. Then, you can pour your efforts into a solution that works for you. Remember, a well-defined problem seeks it own solution.

Here are five signs to look for….

1. You believe you are immune to self-criticism.

This is odd, but it is a near sure sign that your inner critic is silently taking a toll on your psyche. Denial of the inner critic is often a sign that it is winning, especially if you aren’t happy. So many of us simply don’t want to admit that we are  hard on ourselves. In the meantime, the inner critic is whispering away.

People who don’t get trapped by their inner critic are usually open to the fact that they can be hard on themselves. How can this be true? Self-criticism is a universal phenomenon. Everyone is affected. Moving beyond it requires consciously dealing with it.

 2. You can’t keep a quiet mind.

When you pray, meditate or merely attempt to sit quietly, your inner critic sees this as an opportunity to launch an attack. You might be whispering to yourself:

You can’t do this.
You’re  not worthy.
You’re wasting time again.

3. You compare yourself unfavorably to others.

Everyone compares themselves to others. If you consistently feel less than others, however, the comparison is fueled by your inner critic. Reasonably, we all know that unfavorable self-comparisons aren’t valid. Everyone operating under unique circumstances and the comparisons don’t really make sense.

The inner critic isn’t interested in making sense, however. It’s interested in criticizing. The success of others is as good an opportunity as any to take a shot at your self-esteem.

The moral of the story? Your inner critic is real. If you see yourself at all in this post, then consider making your next personal growth project one that confronts the ubiquitous nature of the inner critic. When you’ve achieved peace of mind (and you can) you’ll be so glad you did.

Mike Bundrant is author of Your Achilles Eel: Discover and Overcome the Hidden Cause of Negative Emotions, Bad Decisions and Self-Sabotage. This book is written from the perspective of the inner critic and leads to uncommon healing insights.

Research Reveals Key to Good Leadership

posted by mbundrant

Leaders and managers could often learn a lesson or two from their employees. In fact, when it comes to inspiring employees to be hard working, loyal and committed, a recent study shows the only opinion that really makes a difference is that of the employees themselves.

It turns out, the qualities and abilities that many managers think are necessary to drive productivity have little or no impact on an employees’ willingness to go the extra mile. In fact, what really motivates employees is having a manager they deem worthy of their commitment.

A study was conducted by Karoline Hofslett Kopperud, along with Associate Professor Sut I. Wong Humborstad and Professor Øyvind Marinsen of the BI Norwegian Business School. The trio of researchers studied the responses of 1500 people in leadership roles, along with their respective employees.

As part of the study, leaders and employees were interviewed to determine what managerial traits make a successful leader. While many people in leadership roles touted their own success and managerial abilities, their employees did not necessarily concur that they were good leaders.

To the contrary, the study showed that employees had the highest opinions of leaders who were modest about their abilities and aware of their own shortcomings. Furthermore, employees who viewed their leaders in a positive light, were more likely to increase their level of workplace commitment and dedication. A conscious decision that appears to be inspired by leadership, rather than demanded.

The behavior is what researchers refer to as transformational leadership. Those who conducted themselves with humility and sincerity were valued by their employees. Being a reliable role model for the workplace was a key element in gaining the admiration of employees.

Leaders who were critical about their own management style were also more likely to be revered by their staff. The findings of the study leads to questions about how those in charge perceive which leadership skills have the strongest effect on the workforce.

The results of the research could bring about changes in how corporations train their leaders. The ultimate role of any leader is to foster a productive and committed workplace. Transformational leadership clearly has the highest success rate when it comes to building a strong workforce.

Self-insight into a person’s own ability to lead makes a fundamental difference in employee perceptions, and researchers feel that it should be a focus of leadership development programs.  Teaching high-level managers and leaders to analyze their own actions and see things from the employees’ point of view will enable better relationships and create a positive work environment.

Research Reveals Possibility of Reversing Negative Emotions

posted by mbundrant

imagesDo you experience negative emotions, hatred toward people, fear, jealousy or other destructive states of mind? If so, you’ll be interested in discovering the research below that proves such negative states can be altered by the brain.

A new series of experiments have proven conclusively that there is a circuit in the brain that connects a person’s memories with their emotions.

Understanding how this circuit works, and whether it can be adjusted, is the cornerstone of new research that would change the way mental illnesses like depression and post-traumatic stress disorder are treated in the future.

A group of neuroscientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology conducted a series of ongoing experiments on mice to uncover the specific circuit of the brain that allows a memory to be recalled in either a negative or a positive light. Funded by the RIKEN Brain Science Institute, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the JPB Foundation, the experiments closely monitored two key areas of the brain.

The goal was to see if memories and their consequential emotional responses could be manipulated. The research paper was published in Nature, and revealed a detailed account of the systematic experiments.

The hippocampus, an area of the brain that becomes active when memories are being initiated, stores information from events in the hippocampal cells. However, the amygdala is the region of the brain that stores and retrieves the emotions associated with each event.

Neuroscientists were able to uncover the neuronal circuit that connects these two regions. When a memory is recalled, this specific neural circuit is triggered to connect the memory to the original emotion of the event.

Using a technique called optogenetics, which engages the use of light to alter neuron activity, the experiments successfully reversed the emotional associations with specific events in a group of mice. The pleasant events were recalled as fearful and the fearful events were recalled as pleasant.

The possibilities of this type of activity are a major breakthrough in treating memory associated mental health disorders. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression Anxiety and other mood disorders are just a few examples of disorders that would benefit from the ability to lessen the emotional impact of damaging memories.

While further study is required to fully understand the implications for human subjects, this research opens the door to a new way of studying how the brain’s memory connects with emotional responses.

This research is encouraging because most people have experienced negative events that shape their decisions. This can often lead to self-sabotage.

If you like this article, then like my Facebook Page to keep up with all my writing.

Previous Posts

Six Psychological Secrets to Weight Loss, Based on Scientific Studies
Image source How many times have you followed some popular diet to the letter, then wondered why it didn't work, or why you couldn't stay with it? What most people don't know is this: successful weight loss depends on more than just eating or not eating foods on a list! Losing weight involves so

posted 5:51:49pm Jan. 27, 2015 | read full post »

3 Signs That Your Inner Critic is Winning
On your path of spiritual growth, it's important to know what you're up against. A nearly universal obstacle to inner peace and productivity is the inner critic. The inner critic doesn't care who you are or what you have done. It is only interested in tearing you down. When you make a mistake, it

posted 3:56:28am Jan. 21, 2015 | read full post »

Research Reveals Key to Good Leadership
Leaders and managers could often learn a lesson or two from their employees. In fact, when it comes to inspiring employees to be hard working, loyal and committed, a recent study shows the only opinion that really makes a difference is that of the employees themselves. It turns out, the qualities

posted 8:44:48pm Jan. 19, 2015 | read full post »

Research Reveals Possibility of Reversing Negative Emotions
Do you experience negative emotions, hatred toward people, fear, jealousy or other destructive states of mind? If so, you'll be interested in discovering the research below that proves such negative states can be altered by the brain. A new series of experiments have proven conclusively that ther

posted 9:49:55pm Jan. 15, 2015 | read full post »

5 Simple Steps to Avoid Overeating this Holiday Season
When you tip the scale on January 2nd, 2015, what number do you want to see? Your current weight plus 10-15 pounds? I didn't think so. The problem is, so many of us succumb to the desire for immediate, temporary tastebud gratification (even though most holiday treats don't really taste that gr

posted 7:15:04pm Dec. 11, 2014 | read full post »


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.