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Health On Life's Journey

Health On Life's Journey

Love For Lentils

posted by Cindy L. Tjol

Lentils are one of the easiest legumes to prepare as they are small. And they are highly nutritious.

Lentils are good sources of protein, folic acid as well as trace minerals.

The fiber found in lentils is known to reduce cholesterol as well as keep blood sugar level steady by preventing it from rising too quickly after a meal.

A study conducted in the 1990s on 90,000 over women also found that those who ate beans and lentils had a 24% lower risk of succumbing to breast cancer.

References
[1] Murray, Michael, ND., Pizzorno, Joseph, ND., and Pizzorno, Lara, MA, LMT. The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods. New York, NY: Atria Books, 2005. Print.


Cindy L. TJOL is trained in Psychology, Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine. She has several years of experience writing on natural health on the internet. Follow her on her blog and read her other articles at Insights On Health.com.

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Mineral-rich Molasses

posted by Cindy L. Tjol

Molasses is the syrupy dark liquid that is derived from processing raw sugar into its refined form. While fully refined sugars (eg. white sugar and corn syrup) are quite devoid of any nutrients except glucose, molasses is rich in minerals and offers several health benefits.

Molasses is rich in minerals such as iron, calcium, copper, manganese, potassium and selenium. It is also a good source of vitamin B6 and pantothenic acid.

Iron and copper are needed for the formation of blood. Copper helps the body in the absorption of iron. As a rich source of iron and copper, molasses can be helpful for those with anemia as well as menstruation problems. A deficiency of copper can lead to anemia, thyroid problems, cardiac arrhythmia and osteoporosis.

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The antioxidants present in molasses (absent in refined sugars) can help protect you against oxidative damage linked to cancer, cardiovascular diseases and other degenerative diseases.

The magnesium found in molasses is useful for supporting your nervous system. A deficiency of magnesium in the body can lead to hypertension, muscle cramps and general body fatigue.

Calcium found in molasses is needed for the health of your bones, teeth and muscles. This mineral is also needed for the normal removal of toxins from your colon, as well as for normal cell membrane functions.

The manganese found in molasses supports the healthy production of sex hormones. This is important for normal sexual health. Manganese also plays an important role in the functioning of the nervous system as well as the production of energy.

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Molasses is especially beneficial to pregnant ladies because of its rich iron, vitamin B (folate), and calcium content. These nutrients are needed for the normal growth and development of the baby. Hence, blackstrap molasses is sometimes known as “pregnancy tea”.

Though molasses is used as a sweetener, it doesn’t make you fat. On the contrary, the polyphenols found in this natural sweetener can help you reduce body weight and fat by absorbing calories in the body.

Unlike many sweet foods, blackstrap molasses actually helps stabilize blood sugar levels rather than lead to their wild fluctuations. This is partly because molasses contain substantial amounts of trace element chromium, which has been found to improve insulin action and glucose tolerance in the body.

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Molasses has also been used in the treatment of wounds and skin burns as it promotes the healthy growth of tissues. It is also very much nourishing for the hair and promotes healthy hair growth. It can help soften your hair, giving it a rich texture and prevent premature graying of hair.

References
[1] Murray, Michael, ND., Pizzorno, Joseph, ND., and Pizzorno, Lara, MA, LMT. The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods. New York, NY: Atria Books, 2005. Print.
[2] https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/other/health-benefits-of-molasses.html


Cindy L. TJOL is trained in Psychology, Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine. She has several years of experience writing on natural health on the internet. Follow her on her blog and read her other articles at Insights On Health.com.

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Brilliant Button Mushrooms

posted by Cindy L. Tjol

Button mushrooms include white mushrooms and cremini mushrooms (such as the portobello mushroom).

As fungi, these button mushrooms are extremely rich in selenium (important in the treatment of some cancer), copper, potassium and zinc. These mushrooms also contain some protein (and hence is a good source of protein for vegetarians), B vitamins, riboflavin and pantothenic acid.

Button mushrooms are found to contain cancer preventing polysaccharides and beta-glucans, compounds which are found in greater quantities in shitake and maitake.

With a meatier taste and higher protein content, Portobello makes an especially good dish for vegetarians.

References
[1] Collins, Elise Marie. An A-Z Guide to Healing Foods: A Shopper’s Companion. San Francisco, California: Conari Press, 2009. Print.

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Cindy L. TJOL is trained in Psychology, Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine. She has several years of experience writing on natural health on the internet. Follow her on her blog and read her other articles at Insights On Health.com.

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Cholesterol-friendly Cocoa Butter

posted by Cindy L. Tjol

Extracted from the cacao bean, cocoa butter is extremely beneficial for a healthy cholesterol profile.

Cocoa butter is not only a cholesterol-neutral saturated fat. Containing plant sterols known as sitosterol and stigmasterol, cocoa butter can actually help to reduce your unhealthy cholesterol. In addition, cocoa butter is largely made up of oleic acid, the heart-health-promoting fat also found in olive oil.

Previously cocoa butter was the main ingredient in white chocolate. Nonetheless, many chocolate producers are switching to less expensive and more unhealthy vegetable oil in the production of their chocolates. So do be aware when shopping for your chocolates!

References
[1] Collins, Elise Marie. An A-Z Guide to Healing Foods: A Shopper’s Companion. San Francisco, California: Conari Press, 2009. Print.

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Cindy L. TJOL is trained in Psychology, Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine. She has several years of experience writing on natural health on the internet. Follow her on her blog and read her other articles at Insights On Health.com.

Previous Posts

Love For Lentils
Lentils are one of the easiest legumes to prepare as they are small. And they are highly nutritious. Lentils are good sources of protein, folic acid as well as trace minerals. The fiber found in lentils is known to reduce cholesterol as well as keep blood sugar level steady by preventing it

posted 3:47:38pm Mar. 29, 2015 | read full post »

Mineral-rich Molasses
Molasses is the syrupy dark liquid that is derived from processing raw sugar into its refined form. While fully refined sugars (eg. white sugar and corn syrup) are quite devoid of any nutrients except glucose, molasses is rich in minerals and offers several health benefits. Molasses is rich in m

posted 3:20:24pm Mar. 26, 2015 | read full post »

Brilliant Button Mushrooms
Button mushrooms include white mushrooms and cremini mushrooms (such as the portobello mushroom). As fungi, these button mushrooms are extremely rich in selenium (important in the treatment of some cancer), copper, potassium and zinc. These mushrooms also contain some protein (and hence is a goo

posted 3:20:21pm Mar. 23, 2015 | read full post »

Cholesterol-friendly Cocoa Butter
Extracted from the cacao bean, cocoa butter is extremely beneficial for a healthy cholesterol profile. Cocoa butter is not only a cholesterol-neutral saturated fat. Containing plant sterols known as sitosterol and stigmasterol, cocoa butter can actually help to reduce your unhealthy cholesterol.

posted 11:36:52pm Mar. 18, 2015 | read full post »

Burdock Root Benefits
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posted 2:08:49am Mar. 16, 2015 | read full post »

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