Beliefnet
How Great Thou Part

To the idealist, dreams are exciting.

To the realist, they are impractical.

Dreams can often lead to an internal conflict.

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The one voice who says, ‘go for it!’ or the other that says, ‘run from it!’

How do we decipher what is fact or fiction?

What is worth pursuing and what is not? What is practical and what is impractical? What has substance and what doesn’t?

What is a luxury of youth and what is the practicality of age?

Dreams inspire us but also make us question ourselves.

But they shouldn’t.

Those questions stem from the human condition.

Or what could be labeled ‘doubt.’

Who are we to question what has been put inside our hearts?

Instead, we should listen carefully to those prompts.

Because dreams are simply our translation of God’s voice.

A pull somewhere down within us deeply rooted in our purpose.

Yet we often question this internal voice.

We start off in childhood believing we can be anything we wish to be…the ballerina, the athlete, the attainable and the unattainable.

And oddly, over time as our true talents emerge, we often lose sight of our dreams.

Even the eternal optimist can find themselves questioning when to keep going and when to give up.

But in fact, though our belief in ourselves may leave us, aka, the human condition.

Our dreams never do.

The old man who paints and recalls the childhood joy it gave him. The middle-aged woman who sings and said she once dreamed of being an opera singer. The forty-something financier who binge-watches movies and always wanted to be an actor. The thirty-something mother who always wanted to be an architect.

When we see someone standing on the stage of America’s Got Talent saying they ‘always wanted to do this.’ we can only ask one question…

What stopped them?

More than likely it was the outside world and getting lost in the unique purpose we each have.

 

3 Secrets to Inspire Your Dreams

 

The Human Condition

We are meant to be imperfect and to grow throughout life.

We are meant to make mistakes and reflect and we are meant to question ourselves and grow.

But we are not meant to question our unique footprint.

This might be one of the biggest struggles we experience.

Do we boldly walk towards our heart or do we continually question what is practical or what drives us?

This might be where faith finds its place on earth.

Those who stay true or those who allow the human condition to cloud what drives us.

 

Don’t Ignore God’s Purpose for You

No one has your voice. No one has your unique finger print.No one has your beautiful face. No one has your world view.

This should be enough to convince you how tremendously special you are.

There is only one ‘you’ in this world.

As it was intended to be.

This journey can be spent either accentuating your individuality or diluting it with the world’s opinion of you.

Let’s restate that.

Either concentrate or dilute.

Nothing is stronger once diluted.

 

Do Not Listen to Others

The actress Sharon Stone once said (paraphrased), “I was smart enough to understand rejection was simply one person’s opinion.”

Who is the world to tell you who you are?

Most see the world through their own ‘world view’ a compromised vision of themselves.

It takes an extraordinarily confident individual to see you for exactly who you are. Someone who is so comfortable in their own skin they are not threatened by you being who you are.

Believe in yourself.

God made you.

That should be enough.

He believed in you.

 

There will always be a primal struggle between dreams, practicality, and purpose.

And that something deep inside us which makes us believe we must suppress our dreams.

As if it is the smarter and more practical thing to do.

But again, our dreams are…

Simply our translation of God’s voice.

And He created us.

God does not make mistakes.

 

 

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