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From "Stop and Smell the Rosemary... Recipes and Traditions to Remember," published in cooperation with your DailyInbox newsletter.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1-1/2 cups dried apricots
  • 1/2 cup pecans
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons plus 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon plus 3 tablespoons molasses
  • 2 tablespoons plus 2 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil
  • 1 boneless pork loin roast (5 pounds), halved
  • 1 cup bourbon
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1/4 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

    TO PREPARE:

    Coarsely chop apricots, pecans, garlic, salt, and pepper in a food processor.  Add 2 tablespoons thyme, 1 tablespoon molasses, and 2 tablespoons oil.  Process until mixture is finely chopped, but not smooth.

    Make a lengthwise cut down the center of each roast, cutting to, but not through, the bottom.  Starting from center slice, slice horizontally toward one side, stopping 1/2 inch from edge.  Repeat with other loin half.  Flatten each half to a 1/2-inch thickness using a meat mallet or rolling pin.

    Spread apricot mixture evenly over pork. Roll each loin half, jelly-roll fashion, starting with long side.  Secure with string.  Place both rolls, seam side down, in a shallow roasting pan.  Brush with remaining 2 tablespoons oil and sprinkle with remaining thyme.  Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    Bring bourbon, broth, and remaining 3 tablespoons molasses to a boil in a large saucepan.  Remove from heat.  Carefully ignite bourbon mixture with a long match.  When flames die, pour over roasts.

    Bake at 350 degrees 1 to 1-1/2 hours, or until meat thermometer inserted in thickest portion registers 160 degrees.  Remove pork from pan, reserve drippings, and keep warm.

    Pour reserved drippings in a small saucepan.  Add cream and salt.  Cook over medium-high heat, stirring constantly, until slightly thickened.  Slice pork and serve with sauce.

    SERVES: 10

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