Aphasia-associated Anomia

(Anomia, Aphasia-associated; Nominal Aphasia; Anomic Aphasia; Difficulty Naming Objects and People)

Definition

Aphasia is when a person loses the ability to communicate in words. Anomia is a problem naming objects. When you have aphasia-associated anomia, it is difficult to name people and things. Aphasia-associated anomia can be treated.
Stroke—Most Common Cause of Aphasia
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Causes

Anomia is caused by injury to the language areas of the brain. Examples of injury to the brain are:

Risk Factors

Aphasia-associated anomia is more common in older people. Other factors that may increase your chance of aphasia-associated anomia include:

Symptoms

Tell your doctor if you have difficulty finding the right word when speaking and writing. For example, instead of using an exact word, you may use ambiguous or roundabout speech, such as:
  • Using general descriptions instead of specifics: “that place where you sleep” for “bedroom”
  • Saying what a thing does, but not what it is: “that thing you drive” for “car”
In most cases, you can understand speech and read.

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