Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn

(PPHN; Persistent Fetal Circulation [PFC]; Syndrome of Pulmonary Hypertension of Newborn [SPHN])

Definition

Oxygen is needed in every cell of the body. It first enters the body through the lungs. The oxygen is then picked up by the blood flowing by the lungs. The blood brings oxygen to the rest of the body. In newborns with persistent pulmonary hypertension (PPHN), the blood does not flow by the lungs.The baby's lungs are not used during pregnancy. Instead, oxygen passes from the mother to the baby through the umbilical cord, bypassing the lungs. Once the baby is born, the baby's lungs should take over. When this does not occur, oxygen bypasses the lungs and cannot move from the lungs to the rest of the body.PPHN can be a very serious condition. It can cause both immediate and long-term health problems.
Circulatory System of Infant
AL00079-B 97870 1 ciruclatory infant
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

Causes

PPHN can be caused by a variety of factors, including:
  • An event or illness during pregnancy or childbirth, such as:
    • Meconium aspiration syndrome (the baby inhales meconium—the first stool—prior to or shortly after birth)
    • Severe pneumonia
    • Infection
    • Low blood sugar
    • Birth asphyxia (loss of oxygen to the fetus during delivery)
    • Respiratory distress syndrome —caused by lungs that have not fully developed
    • Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) by the mother during pregnancy
    • Late trimester maternal use of antidepressants, especially SSRIs
    • Amniotic fluid leak
    • Low amniotic fluid— oligohydramnios
    • Abnormal lung development as a result of congenital diaphragmatic hernia or Potter syndrome
  • Stress during pregnancy
  • Isolated condition with an unknown cause

leave comments
0
Did you like this? Share with your family and friends.
Related Topics:
Current Research From Top Journals


Early Peanut Consumption Associated with Lower Risk of Peanut Allergy in High Risk Children
March 2015

Many medical groups felt that early exposure to certain foods like peanuts increased a child's risk of developing food allergies. However, newer research including this trial suggest that early exposure may actually decrease the risk of developing food allergies.

dot separator
previous editions

Breastfeeding May Decrease the Risk of Childhood Obesity
February 2015

Tonsillectomy May Reduce Number of Sore Throat Days in Children
February 2015

Research Review Finds Little Support for Nearly Half of Medical Talk Show Recommendations
January 2015

dashed separator

Advertisement

Our Free Newsletter
click here to see all of our uplifting newsletters »

 

Advertisement

Advertisement

DiggDeliciousNewsvineRedditStumbleTechnoratiFacebook