Seizure—Child

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Definition

A seizure is a sudden change in behavior. It is caused by sudden, abnormal, and excessive electrical activity in the brain. A neonatal seizure occurs in newborn babies. Seizures may be severe or mild. They may cause physical changes like convulsions. It may affect only part of the body or the entire body. A short seizure itself does not cause serious health conditions. Prolonged seizures can lead to permanent damage. The damage is due to decreased oxygen and excessive brain cell activity.
Generalized Seizure
Generalized seizure
Abnormal and excessive electrical activity in the brain.
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

Causes

There are a variety of causes of seizures in children, which include:
  • Conditions like epilepsy
  • An injury or trauma to the head
  • Infections, including meningitis and abscesses in the brain
  • Brain tumor
  • Stroke
  • Accidental poisoning
  • Certain medical conditions, including:
    • Low blood sugar
    • Very high fever (especially in children)—called febrile seizures
    • Electrolyte abnormalities
  • Hydrocephalis
  • Congenital diseases or deformities
Sometimes seizures occur for unknown reasons.

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