Ectopic Pregnancy

(Tubal Pregnancy)

Definition

An ectopic pregnancy is a pregnancy that occurs outside of the womb (uterus). Most ectopic pregnancies occur within a fallopian tube. Other, less common locations may include the cervix, an ovary, or the abdominal cavity. This type of pregnancy cannot survive because only the uterus can support the growth of a fetus and its placenta.
Ectopic Pregnancy
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Causes

Many ectopic pregnancies occur because the fallopian tube is not functioning normally.

Risk Factors

Factors that may increase the risk ectopic pregnancy include:

Symptoms

Symptoms may include:
  • Missed or abnormal menstrual period
  • Abdominal pain
  • Spotty vaginal bleeding
  • Pain in the shoulder
  • Fainting

Diagnosis

The doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be also be done.Tests may include:
  • Pregnancy test
  • Pelvic exam
  • Blood tests
  • Transvaginal ultrasound (to check the uterus and fallopian tubes for the presence or absence of a pregnancy)

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