Malaria

Definition

Malaria is a disease passed through the blood. It is typically passed to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito but can also be passed from mother to unborn child or during a blood transfusion from an infected donor.

Causes

Malaria is caused by a specific type of parasite.Most often, a mosquito picks up the parasite when it bites someone with malaria. The mosquito can pass the parasite to a new person when it bites them. The parasite then travels to and multiplies in the liver.After several days, the new parasites leave the liver and pass into the bloodstream. The parasites infect the red blood cells and within 48 hours, the infected red blood cells burst. The parasites then go on to infect more red blood cells.
Malaria Cycle
Nucleus factsheet image
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

Risk Factors

Living in or traveling to hot, humid climates where Anopheles mosquitoes are common is the most common risk factor for malaria. Africa, Asia, and Latin America all have areas where malaria is common. Fatal cases have occurred in tourists visiting game parks and other rural areas in east Africa.Your chance of getting malaria increases dramatically if basic prevention step listed below are not followed.

Symptoms

There are no symptoms in the early stage of infection.Symptoms usually begin within 10 days to four weeks after being bitten by an infected mosquito. Symptoms may include:
  • Recurrent fevers—as high as 106° F (41.1° C)
  • Chills and sweats
  • Muscles aches
  • Headaches
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Anemia
  • Yellow coloring of the eyes and skin— jaundice
  • Dark or discolored urine
Seek medical care right if you suspect malaria or if you have traveled to an area of the world where malaria occurs. Without treatment, the cycle of red blood cell destruction and fever will continue. This can lead to death.Some types of malaria may not produce symptoms for a year or more. The severity of symptoms and death rate are often associated with the specific type of malaria.

leave comments
0
Did you like this? Share with your family and friends.
Related Topics:
Current Research From Top Journals



April 2015

A systematic review found that participants given chewing gum after abdominal surgery may have a faster return to normal for their digestive system. Unfortunately, the quality of trials is low and more research will need to be done before this simple solution is confirmed.

dot separator
previous editions

Early Peanut Consumption Associated with Lower Risk of Peanut Allergy in High Risk Children
March 2015

Breastfeeding May Decrease the Risk of Childhood Obesity
February 2015

Tonsillectomy May Reduce Number of Sore Throat Days in Children
February 2015

dashed separator

Advertisement

Our Free Newsletter
click here to see all of our uplifting newsletters »

 

Advertisement

Advertisement

DiggDeliciousNewsvineRedditStumbleTechnoratiFacebook