Windows and Doors

Windows and Doors


Father’s Day Lessons From the Bible’s Lousy Dads

posted by Brad Hirschfield

Father’s Day is not only a great time to celebrate fatherhood, and the actual fathers in our lives, but a good opportunity to think about what being a father really means and how to get better at it. The Bible provides many examples of how to be a dad, and while many of them are examples of lousy fatherhood, they are valuable nonetheless. Who knows, perhaps it’s better that way.
After all, if Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were all lousy fathers, why should any father be perfect? But in the spirit of the ancient rabbis, who teach us that the acts of our ancestors are a signal to us, the following stories can help all fathers (and mothers) parent better.
Before getting to the specifics, I want to be clear that I write with great love of these characters. Like all genuine love, my affection for these ancient dads allows me to see the bad along with the good and even pushes me to see what can be learned from former as much as the latter — that alone is an important thing to consider when thinking about the fathers in our lives. So with that in mind, I offer three fathering lessons from the biblical fathers.


Abraham, who was ready to slaughter his son Isaac for God, does not jump out as an all-star dad. And when we recall that his dalliance with filicide followed the willing abandonment of his elder son, Ishmael, he really looks like the kind of parent about whom one would call Protective Services. So what’s the lesson? Don’t let the faith you follow blind you to the needs of the children you are raising.
Most religious parents, including myself, want their kids to embrace faith as they do. But when that desire blinds us to the needs or integrity of our individual children, something is off. Yes, there are ways to explain away or contextualize Abraham’s behavior toward his sons, but that is not the point. The point is to tread cautiously when it comes to imposing our spiritual paths on our children.
Isaac, was literally blind to who his children were. And how often does that happen to us? How often do we see our kids as who we need them to be instead of who they really are. How often do we value our kids because of what they do for us instead of how they become who they most need to be? One need go no further than an any junior athletic league to get the painful answer to that question.
If Abraham surrendered too much to God, then Isaac surrendered too much to himself. And while that might have been a healthy corrective for him, given how he was raised, it didn’t create the best experience for his sons and their subsequent relationship. So if we want kids who love both themselves and their siblings, we need to love them for who they are, not for how much they meet our own needs.
And speaking of relations between siblings brings father Jacob to mind. He actually raised the creation of sibling rivalry to an art form. How? By playing out issues with his wives in the lives of his sons. And in a world of increasingly blended families, that’s an increasingly complex issue.
As fathers, we need to be really careful about saddling our kids with baggage from our own intimate relationships with their moms. Whether, over the course of our lives, we have one wife or many, our kids’ lives are not the stage on which to play out the tensions which exist in our marriages. While some of that is always inevitable because we are integrated beings, we can at least learn to ask if issues with our kids are about the kids, or whatever may be going on with our partners, whether present or past.
The Bible is the “Good Book”, not because all of its stories and characters are good. In fact, as we see here, not even the so-called good characters are always good. But there are always great lessons to be learned from the Bible’s stories. This Father’s Day, I will be thinking about my own forefathers, how they were often lousy fathers, and what I can learn from that legacy in order to do a bit better by my own kids.



Advertisement
Comments read comments(9)
post a comment
emily

posted June 19, 2010 at 11:19 am


divide to survive? or act out the pain of the rejection?
the story divides me….



report abuse
 

Hector

posted June 20, 2010 at 3:13 am


Rabbi, you may wish to review Genesis 21.
> “And when we recall that his dalliance with filicide followed the willing abandonment of his elder son, Ishmael, he really looks like the kind of parent about whom one would call Protective Services.”
Abraham was willing? Genesis 21 seems to say otherwise:
And Sarah saw the son of Hagar the Egyptian, whom she had borne unto Abraham, making sport. Wherefore she said unto Abraham: ‘Cast out this bondwoman and her son; for the son of this bondwoman shall not be heir with my son, even with Isaac.’
And the thing was very grievous in Abraham’s sight on account of his son. And God said unto Abraham: ‘Let it not be grievous in thy sight because of the lad, and because of thy bondwoman; in all that Sarah saith unto thee, hearken unto her voice; for in Isaac shall seed be called to thee.



report abuse
 

withyobadself

posted June 20, 2010 at 7:01 am


wasnt the old testament origionally written in hebrew??? it should have stayed that way.. 100% pure … just like cocaine the bible was cut and mixed with other cultures interpretation of the history of man..why would god need himself to be explained this way… thats why he sent the messiah of love , jesus to liberate the jews from religion.. to explain you can talk to god anytime you want.. god belongs to everyone.. fathers day was invented to force people to believe they have to spend thier money ..for the economy… which would benefit the jews,more than anyone else since they pretty much run america…



report abuse
 

withyobadself

posted June 20, 2010 at 7:30 am


i just saw a picture of the iranian leader posted on this site .. the ad posted is designed to tell people god gives permission to the jews to kill all enemies.. very sad.. jews go kill everyone you want.. dont be fooled into thinking god approves… your messiah was a messiah of love,jesus who said have nothing to do with the world .love eachother and god..the messiah of love doesnt want you jews to protect israel… your messiah of war.. lucifer does!! kill because your faith is weak ..using god to promote war will only make god mad.. then god will punish you ..again



report abuse
 

Hector

posted June 22, 2010 at 12:11 am


withyobadself writes: “the ad posted is designed to tell people god gives permission to the jews to kill all enemies”
Whatever you’ve been smoking — can I have some?



report abuse
 

buy lexapro online

posted June 22, 2010 at 6:45 pm


thanks for good oppinion i love to know more



report abuse
 

cuy9

posted June 23, 2010 at 8:13 am

hnspklmh2

posted June 23, 2010 at 8:16 am

mypromoeffori

posted October 1, 2010 at 3:25 pm


It was many years ago we first selected Top Restaurants in the U.S. See it. http://restaurants-us.com/md/Baltimore/Mc%20Donald%27s/21201/



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More blogs to enjoy!
Thank you for visiting Windows and Doors. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Truths You Can Use Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 1:28:03pm Aug. 02, 2012 | read full post »

Apple's "Jew or Not Jew" App -- Should It Be Legal?
An Apple application that let users guess which French politicians or celebrities are Jewish was pulled from France's App Store. but its American equivalent is still available. French activist groups said the "Jew or Not Jew?" app violated bans on compiling information on people's religion and rev

posted 1:18:48am Sep. 18, 2011 | read full post »

Is God A Christian?
R. Kirby Godsey’s new book, Is God A Christian?, challenges what the author describes as the commonly held belief among many religious people that the God in whom they believe is “one of them”.  People, Mr. Kirby observes, too often confuse God’s religious identity with their own, leading t

posted 11:59:56am Sep. 12, 2011 | read full post »

Remembering 9/11 - Part One
The tenth anniversary of 9/11 brings up many emotions and presents some very real challenges, among them how to remember the past without being imprisoned by it.  This video, filmed at St. Paul's, the church closest to the World Trade Center site, is a wonderful example of rising to that challen

posted 2:40:58pm Sep. 08, 2011 | read full post »

Gilad Shalit, Still A Prisoner After 1,900 Days
Below is a copy of the Statement I got from the White House, and while I appreciate the words, I can't help but also ask, "Is this the best we can do?"  United States Mission to the United Nations Office of Press and Public Diplomacy 799 United Nations Plaza New York, NY 10017 (212) 41

posted 9:04:17am Sep. 08, 2011 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.