Rod Dreher

Rod Dreher


Monsanto’s genetically-modified Eucharist

posted by Rod Dreher

Many religions have laws governing ritual purity. The Roman Catholic Church, for example, ruled that under its own laws, a gluten-free wheat wafer cannot be used to confect the Eucharist. Unless you are a canonist or otherwise versed in this sort of thing, please, reader, spare me complaints about this. It is just as parochial to complain about why Jews can’t eat bacon, Muslims can’t drink wine, and so forth. It is what it is, and there are reasons within the various traditions for these taboos. The point is, gluten-free wheat wafers are unacceptable for the Eucharist in Catholic churches, because the Church teaches that they literally cannot be transformed into the Body of Christ by the priest. For Catholics and Orthodox, the bread literally becomes the flesh of God; you can’t just use any old bread, or the ritual will not work. That’s why making sure you have the right elements (e.g., wheat that’s “kosher” for Eucharist) is so important. That’s got The Ochlophobist wondering about whether or not bread made from genetically modified (GMO) wheat can pass these purity laws, both in the Catholic and Orthodox churches. Depending on how the various churches rule on the GMO wheat matter, this could be a huge problem, given how quickly GMO crops are becoming the standard in this country.
Which brings Ochlophobist to a critical point. Emphasis mine:

Once GMO wheat takes over the market, going to the store and getting a non-GMO, unbleached white baking wheat flour is going to cost a lot more than it does today. I suppose even the poorest Orthodox parishes could still afford it, but nonetheless there is something disheartening in having to go to an upscale store or the upscale aisle at your local grocery in order to purchase something which is natural and relatively unmolested. As we see in so many arenas in the late modern American life, what was once a good quotidian human act or experience shared by the many is now only kept for the rich. One pays top dollar today to eat the sorts of foods once eaten by peasants – a simple stew with a couple ounces of pasture fed beef and organic vegetables and grains which have been processed in a traditional manner might cost you $60 at the right place. Purchasing the requisite items at Whole Foods might still cost you $20. Thus unless you are a person of means, you either grow/raise the food yourself or you eat laboratory foods.

By the way, last summer as we drove to Colorado, we passed a Monsanto plant in the Texas panhandle. My wife hissed at it. What’s that about? I asked. “Do you not understand what that company is all about?!” she shot back. And then she proceeded to tell me, chapter and verse, with the approximate vigor of Luther reading out his 95 Theses. This is the kind of thing she’s talking about: in 2003, Monsanto sued a large Maine organic dairy for putting on its milk cartons a statement saying that its milk contains no artificial growth hormones; the agribusiness giant, which manufactures synthetic growth hormone used on milk cattle, said that the statement hurt its business. The dairy settled out of court with Monsanto, under terms that weren’t disclosed. Ochlophobist writes:

When a company with $110 million a year in profits [the Maine dairy] cannot muster a serious fight against Monsanto simply to defend its right to state what it does not put into its milk, you can imagine the intimidation that your local family raw milk farmer feels when facing the prospects of fighting a dairy industry and state bureaucrats controlled by Monsanto who are dead set on keeping raw milk sales, even private sales, illegal.

I showed Julie this entry before I scheduled it to post. She said, “Oh, you haven’t seen Food, Inc. yet. Wait till you see what Monsanto does to people who try to save seed.”



Advertisement
Comments read comments(81)
post a comment
Zoetius

posted July 14, 2010 at 8:58 am


See Food, INC.
You may find that the concern for ritual purity is moot. Monsanto products seem to be invasive, and heirloom and local crops seem to be transgenetically vulnerable. “Pure” grains may not exist in 5-10 years.
CAPTCHA
in newlands



report abuse
 

Jon

posted July 14, 2010 at 9:15 am


Even the wheat used in Jesus’ day was not “natural” but was the result of millennia of hybridization, giving it a genome like nothing found in nature. And deliberate genetic modifications or not, there is almost certainly no wheat in existence today that is genetically identical to that used in Jesus time as hybridizaion has continued space.



report abuse
 

Helen

posted July 14, 2010 at 9:21 am


Re: the Catholic prohibition on gluten-free communion wafers. I understand there are reasons for the prohibition. At the same time, the rule does mean that folks with celiac disease can never, ever take communion. I know there is some controversey about whether the low-gluten wafers (which are permitted by the Catholic church) are safe for people with celiac disease. I can say from observing my sister, who has celiac disease, that at least for some people with the disease those low-gluten wafers are not safe.
I doubt the church will ever change the rule, which is, of course, their perogative. I just wanted to mention, though, that it is very painful for Catholics who wish to take communion but cannot.



report abuse
 

My Name

posted July 14, 2010 at 9:23 am


I’m going to play devil’s advocate for a second about the label issue, but only to make people think about it more carefully. The following points are only for the sake of argument, not because I’m pro-injecting-hormones-into-cows.
Is it possible to think about what the Maine dairy did as akin to a yogurt company putting “no trans fat” on its label or a sugar-loaded soft drink saying “No High Fructose Corn Syrup”? Actually, since milk naturally contains hormones that are (I’m pretty sure, please correct me if I’m not) biochemically identical to the synthetic hormones that are added, would it be like a butter label saying “no added saturated fat”?
Again, In real life I’m ambivalent at best about treating farm animals as machines that need tinkering in order to increase efficiency. I certainly think that Monsanto was not harmed in any major way by this (though they could have made a case for at least some damages given the sales increases the smaller dairy enjoyed after they changed the label).



report abuse
 

Dan O.

posted July 14, 2010 at 9:40 am


This is one of those things that it’s not worth playing Devil’s advocate about. Growth hormone is injected into cows to increase milk production. Antibiotics are injected to control the mastitis (i.e breast infection) that results.
First problem. Synthetic growth hormone ends up in milk.
Second problem. Antibiotics generate resistant superbugs creating an antibiotics-genetic resistance arms race.
Third problem. It’s cruel to the cows. This is the one that animates me the most. My wife got mastitis during initial breastfeeding of our daughter, a result of overactive letdown and blockage. She found it horribly painful, and wouldn’t wish that on anyone, even an animal. She slogged through the pain (women are tough!) because she felt it was important to breastfeed our daughter. These cows don’t have that purpose.
I think it’s forbidden to us to torture for pleasure, or to make pleasure cheaper. Increasing milk supply to the point where one predictably causes mastitis seems to me close to torture.
Lastly, I think that genetic use restriction technology that Monsanto plays with has got to be one of the most dangerous ideas I’ve ever heard. I think if the majority of people had any interest what it was all about, they’d show up on their doorstep with torches and pitchforks.



report abuse
 

AnitaAshland

posted July 14, 2010 at 9:45 am


“Unless you are a canonist or otherwise versed in this sort of thing, please, reader, spare me complaints about this.”
Or unless you have celiac diesease and the wheat wafer damages your small intestines. I’m Orthodox and have celiac disease and wish the church provided gluten-free options.



report abuse
 

Dan O.

posted July 14, 2010 at 9:48 am


P.S. I would gleefully buy milk from a producer that advertised, “We don’t torture our cows!” provided it were true. I’d pay a premium, even if the only difference between it, and another bottle of milk produced similarly, were the slogan. I’d dig the moral vibe. It’d increase my enjoyment. The fact that such a producer would be litigated out of existence bums me out. I’m with Rod on this one.
(Note: If I were a Catholic that’s how I’d start the argument against certain kinds of genetically modified wheat. Maybe wheat from terminator seed stock would be verboten. Why? Because it creates the wrong moral vibe.)



report abuse
 

Rod Dreher

posted July 14, 2010 at 9:56 am


Anita, we just had our boys tested for celiac disease, given some health issues they had (they came back negative). Is it the case with celiac that even the tiniest fragment of glutinous bread causes intolerable problems? I don’t know. But if not, it seems to me that a fragment of bread from the communion cup (Orthodox Christians, readers, take communion from a spoon dipped into a cup, in which the consecrated bread has been soaked in consecrated wine) wouldn’t be that big of a deal. Maybe it is. You certainly would know. Let me ask, though: even if the normal size “serving” of communion is too much for celiac sufferers, could your priest not intentionally give you a tiny fragment of that in the spoon? For Catholic celiac sufferers, would it not be possible to ask the priest in advance to break off a tiny fragment of the consecrated wafer to offer as communion?
The reason the Orthodox Church doesn’t offer “options” for celiac sufferers, I’m guessing, is because it cannot do so, any more than it can offer consecrated grape juice to alcoholic communicants in lieu of wine.



report abuse
 

Helen

posted July 14, 2010 at 10:09 am


Rod, advice to celiac patients varies. My sister was advised to cut all gluten out of her diet, strictly and religiously. Any time my sister ingests even a tiny crumb of food with gluten (when, for example, she has not prepared the food herself) she is in agony for days.
When a person with celiac disease stops eating all gluten his or her intestines begin to heal. The latest science on celiac suggests, though, that any ingestion of gluten at all, even the smallest bit, resets the clock (so to speak) on that healing.
I am ashamed to say I didnh’t believe celiac was that big a deal until my sister was diagnosed. It’s a complicated immune disorder, and sufferers are often in great physical pain until diagnosed. My sister almost never eats a meal that she or her husband did not prepare. It’s quite serious and life-changing.
So short answer — if you have celiac disease, you really should not eat any gluten at all ever, including “low-gluten” communion wafers.



report abuse
 

John Gibaon

posted July 14, 2010 at 10:12 am


Helen,
The Church does recognize that there are individuals who cannot partake of the host. For these the Church has specifically said that they may take communion via the precious blood, which is wholly Christ on its own. The person may have to speak with the priest about doing it this way, but it is allowed.
It is in the same vein as myself who is an Eastern Catholic. My 4 year old son had his first communion and is confirmed at baptism, according to the ancient rites. However when we attend an RC church, unless I talk to the Priest they try to give him a blessing rather than communion. So I approach the priest first, explain it to them, and usually there has been no issue.
John
captcha soil 1978



report abuse
 

Helen

posted July 14, 2010 at 10:13 am


Just wanted to reiterate — not being able to take communion is deeply painful for my (Catholic) sister. It’s the central part of the mass, and I know she feels bereft without it.
I suppose it’s just one of those sad things, nothing to be done about it. But still. It’s upsetting to see how much it hurts her. The celiac changed her life so much, in so many unfortunate ways — no more baked goods from bakeries, no more birthday cake at parties, etc. — losing communion was yet another painful blow.



report abuse
 

Helen

posted July 14, 2010 at 10:17 am


John — The host is usually dipped in the wine, which contaminates that wine for those with celiac disease. Yes, the priest can set aside some wine for parishioners who have celiac. But it’s surprisingly hard to remember to do so, every week, and make sure any new or visiting priest does so, etc. People with celiac drink the wine during communion at their peril.
Also, most people don’t take the prohibition on gluten seriously. It’s only a crumb, how bad can it be, etc. People with celiac learn that, however well-meaning others without the disease are, they must ensure for themselves that they don’t ingest any gluten at all.



report abuse
 

Turmarion

posted July 14, 2010 at 10:19 am


Re celiac disease, the obvious option is to take Communion under the species of wine only. Beer, being made from grain, is usually verboten for celiac sufferers (a friend of mine is one), but wine, being made from grapes, is OK. Catholic teaching is that Christ is fully present in each of the species. This is why the old custom of taking Communion only under the species of bread is valid–one still receives the whole Christ, body and blood, soul and divinity. Likewise, people who can’t take solid food often communicate under the species of the wine only. Thus, it would seem to be no problem.
I don’t know how the Orthodox would view this, but I imagine there’d be no theological (as opposed to canonical or customary) object to Communion under one species only. Since intincturing is the norm, and small fragments of the Host would permeate the Precious Blood, giving the faithful a bit of the fluid even without visible particles of the Host probably wouldn’t work. Some of the Precious Blood would have to be set aside before the Host was added to the chalice.
This would be a departure from the norm, but according to the principle of oikonomia, I don’t see why it couldn’t be done, with proper ecclesiastical approval. Perhaps Anita should contact her bishop or metropolitan to discuss the issue.
CAPTCHA: clears food Now that’s darn creepy….



report abuse
 

Helen

posted July 14, 2010 at 10:22 am


I should also mention, being diagnosed with celiac was a huge relief for my sister (in addition to being life-changing and sad) because it explained the near-constant stomach pain she had. And cutting out gluten did indeed end that pain.



report abuse
 

Karl G

posted July 14, 2010 at 10:24 am


The better solution to the communion problem is one that has already been established for the benefit of alcoholics- either species is considered sufficient to qualify as proper communion; if you’re an alcoholic, take only the bread, if you’re a celiac, take only the wine.
Additionally, it’s not completely true that there aren’t low gluten options available:
http://altarbreadsbspa.com/lowgluten.php
But it’s not completely clear whether even that low level is safe enough for occasional exposure. If you want to play it safe, it’s probably better to request just the drink.



report abuse
 

Helen

posted July 14, 2010 at 10:26 am


It think we are all posting at the same time. Tumarion, see my response to John re: taking the wine only at communion. It’s still dangerous for folks with celiac disease, since you can’t be sure the wine has not been contaminated.



report abuse
 

Karl G

posted July 14, 2010 at 10:32 am


While it’s perfectly fine to say that a person may have to regularly remind a priest that’s unfamiliar with such needs to set aside wine that won’t have bread dipped in it, I’d think that any priest that would protest that this is an undue burden of any sort is in the wrong vocation.
Also, looking at the material available, it does not seem that this is a fully closed matter- while there’s currently an official stance on it, the internal debate on the matter seems to be decently active.



report abuse
 

Helen

posted July 14, 2010 at 10:43 am


Karl — It’s good to hear that the gluten-in-communion issue is not closed. I know my sister would be so pleased to have a non-gluten alternative to the gluten host wafer.
I agree that it’s no big deal to remind the priest to set aside some wine for folks with celiac, and that any priest who objected would be a first-class jerk. That’s not really the problem. When a person with celiac goes up for communion, he or she is trusting that the wine is not contaminated, that the priest has not forgotten or become distracted when setting up for mass, etc. For at least some people with celiac (my sister included), any little slip-up by the priest, no matter how innocent or unintentional, could mean days of agony. When my sister goes to the alter she has no real way of knowing that the priest remembered to set aside wine, that no one inadvertently contaminated it, etc. — even if she reminded everyone under the sun about it. The safest thing for her is not to take communion. I guess I should mention she tried taking just the wine twice and each time was sick afterwards. it’s possible the wine was not contaminated, but how could she know? She didn’t feel comfortable questioning the priest about it (did you REALLY do what I said, etc.). So it’s safer for her to avoid communion altogether.
I didn’t mean to de-rail this thread. I can denounce Monsanto with the best of them! I just wanted to respond to Rod’s remark that it’s not worth complaining about the gluten rule, and just say that for some that rule is very painful.



report abuse
 

Excommunication

posted July 14, 2010 at 10:57 am


Just as those who perform homosexual acts are in rebellion against Natural Law, and those who use birth control pills are in rebellion against Life, so too are those who reject the Eucharist in rebellion against the Body of Christ.
Through the Miracle of Transubstantiation, the Bread becomes Flesh, and NO GLUTEN REMAINS. Those who reject this have earned excommunication through their lack of faith and discernment.
Those who choke on the Bread of Christ will feast on the Cake of Hellfire.
Happy Bastille Day, Beloveds!



report abuse
 

The Sicilian Woman

posted July 14, 2010 at 11:17 am


Obviously, Excommunication above does not suffer from celiac disease.
If the priest cannot transform a non-wheat wafer into the Eucharist (gravely problematic from a philosphical and theological standpoint, but I will leave my thoughts at that), do you really think he can rid the Eucharist of gluten? Please.
Captcha: longterm choice *cue Twilight Zone music*



report abuse
 

Mark P. Shea

posted July 14, 2010 at 11:18 am


Re: Excommunication
Living proof that there is no subject, no matter how sacred and sensitive, that cannot attract at least one jerk.



report abuse
 

AnitaAshland

posted July 14, 2010 at 11:19 am


Helen is correct that someone with celiac must follow a strictly-gluten free diet and avoid even crumbs, as any amount is damaging to the small intestines.
The wine and the bread in an Orthodox chalice is mixed together. So taking just wine from the chalice means it has been contaminated by wheat. So the ideal situation would be as Turmarion suggested, wine-only from a separate cup. I’ll have to check into this.



report abuse
 

Helen

posted July 14, 2010 at 11:25 am


To The Sicilian Woman and Mark P. Shea — thank you.



report abuse
 

Alice

posted July 14, 2010 at 11:32 am


Excommunication,
You apparently do not understand transubstantiation. A Catholic believes that the appearances of bread and wine remain even after the elements become the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ. Since the appearances remain, short another miracle over and above the miracle of transubstantiation, the human body WILL perceive the Eucharist as ordinary bread and/or wine and process it accordingly. (As St. Thomas Aquinas explains, the only part of the body not deceived by the Eucharist are the ears.) In the case of someone with celiac disease, the digestive track will be harmed. I know of a former seminarian and a devout daily Mass attending Catholic, neither of whom can receive Holy Communion under the appearance of Bread. Instead, a separate chalice must be consecrated for them, no commingling may take place, and no one who has received the Eucharist under the appearance of bread may drink from it until the people for whom the chalice was intended have done so.
Your attitude is very similar to the attitude I noticed on certain Orthodox internet forums, even from priests. These people seemed to consider the very idea that one would become sick from the Eucharist proof that the communicant had no faith. Others, took a more “Western” approach and assumed that the digestive track, just as the senses might be deceived by the appearances of the Eucharist.



report abuse
 

PDGM

posted July 14, 2010 at 11:40 am


Excommunication,
In addition to being a jerk, you’re an ignorant one.
You really should read up on your Catholic theology of transubstantiation. The Catholic church’s theology of the eucharist does NOT claim that scientific analysis of a consecrated wafer reveals the body and blood of Christ. Rather, scientific analysis would reveal only physical properties, which are basically in Aristotelian terms (and Catholic eucharistic theology is still Aristotelian) accidents rather than the substance itself, which has “transubstantiated” into the body and blood of Christ. And when your body digests the wafer, it does not digest it as meat; it digests it as unleavened wheat.
But in order to understand this, you’d have to read Thomas Aquinas, and it would help to read some of Aristotle’s Physics as well. That’s hard; being an a**hole isn’t; it’s easy.
Have a nice day!
PDGM



report abuse
 

MC

posted July 14, 2010 at 12:04 pm


I am simply blown away by fact that Mr. Dreher has not seen Food, Inc. He may as well have been an executive producer, given the subject matter.
I thought the movie was often contradictory (So, it’s wrong for the slaughterhouse to hire immigrants for their low wages, but it’s also bad for them to fire those same immigrants when ICE comes calling?) I’m a fan of big delicious Frankenfood. But the seed saving part of the movie truly outraged me. There oughta be a law against that kind of litigative extortion.



report abuse
 

kenneth

posted July 14, 2010 at 12:08 pm


There are some very valid concerns about agribusiness at play here. On the other hand if priests cannot transform GMO wheat into the body of Christ, perhaps they need to brush up on their spell work! Seriously, do we really know that it was wheat bread used at the last supper? If it was, we’re certainly not using the same cultivars or growing methods as they were at that time. While were on the subject of external forms, I’m going to go out on a limb and suggest that “bread” to first-century Jews was probably not the flat cardboard-like wafers of modern communion fare.



report abuse
 

Jeffersonian

posted July 14, 2010 at 12:15 pm


y’all, I think that was a [bad] attempt at sarcasm by a one-and-done poster, so I’m not going to take offense. If he/she shows up again, it will just to be to incite a flamewar, so just ignore it.
Anyway, I’m Baptist, where communion is symbolic not transubtantiative, so I have options– anything wheat-free can substitute, from rice-based wafers to Blue Diamond NutThins you can get at Kroger. We also have the liquid part distributed in individual portions in disposable cups, so cross-contamination isn’t an issue. The only hitch is getting the pastor and, especially, the deacon doing the serving to understand what is going on.
There may be answers at http://www.celiac.com and http://www.glutenfreemall.com.
As to Monsatan, there aren’t enough circles in Dante’s inferno for that bunch. Yes, Rod, get Food, Inc. It’s available for instant viewing on Netflix through a Wii or on your desktop/laptop [whichever you have].



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted July 14, 2010 at 12:36 pm


I think everything that can be said about Catholicism and gluten has been said.
I’m no fan of Monsanto, and I wish I could blame them for our nation’s ludicrous laws regulating the sale of raw milk. However, our state bureaucracies and a small cadre of trial lawyers are doing Monsanto’s work for them.
One in particular (I won’t mention his name as that will attract his brood of clients who now serve as PR flaks) has basically threatened to sue every raw milk manufacturer in the United States.
I’ve looked into some of the research regarding Monsanto’s Round Up resistant seeds. I’m not sure the evidence is there to suggest that they are invasive to the degree they would impact crops at neighboring farms.
If you want to see Monsanto’s thumbprint, look no further than the battle over salt. The science linking salt consumption to strokes and heart disease is tenuous at best, but some members of congress want to mandate lower levels in our food. As it happens, those members of congress have ties to Monsanto and big corn. This seems a transparent attempt to divert attention from high fructose corn syrup.
It seems to me that the anti-Monsanto crowd is too often driven by paranoia and extremism. I joined the “Millions Against Monsanto” page on Facebook, and was treated to calls to impeach Clarence Thomas. Um, what?



report abuse
 

Hector

posted July 14, 2010 at 1:15 pm


I don’t like Monsanto much (or large businesses in general), and I dislike the fact that GMO technologies are owned by big corporations, but I don’t have any objections to the technologies themselves. Gene transfer between species does happen in nature, if rarely, and the ability to, say, produce Bt toxins, or to tolerate Roundup, is probably a net good thing from the point of view of the environment. Controlling insects with naturally occuring bacterial toxins is more environmentally innocuous then controlling them with pesticides, and controlling weeds with herbicides is probably a better alternative to more frequent tilling (which produces a lot of greenhouse gases, among other things). It should be noted that as far as I know, there currently isn’t any GMO wheat out there, though there may be soon. But you can count me as generally being in favour of GMO technologies, though I’d rather see them be in the public domain.
I would hope that the canon lawyers don’t decide to rule that GMO wheat is unacceptable for the Eucharist. Then again, I’m not a RC, so it’s not my business to tell the Catholic church what to do, but I certainly hope that Anglican churches don’t rule out using the GMO flour for the Eucharist.



report abuse
 

Hector

posted July 14, 2010 at 1:22 pm


If the Ochlophobist is right, and wheat with an added protein is not fair game for the eucharist, then that opens up a whole slew of questions. Many modern wheat varieties have genes (and thus, proteins) derived from related species (various wheatgrasses, etc.) that were bred into the wheat in order to provide disease resistance, drought tolerance, and so forth. I don’t know much about the history, but I would bet that the wheat varieties grown throughout Christian history also were the result of some hybridization to introduce foreign genes. Bread wheat itself is the product of hybridization between durum wheat (what they use for pasta) and a wild relative. If ‘no foreign proteins from other species’ is adopted as a rule that would seem to become problematic very quickly.
Few things in the plant world are genetically ‘pure’, and hybridization happens all the time.



report abuse
 

Jeffersonian

posted July 14, 2010 at 1:23 pm


Kevin S.: It seems to me that the anti-Monsanto crowd is too often driven by paranoia and extremism. I joined the “Millions Against Monsanto” page on Facebook, and was treated to calls to impeach Clarence Thomas. Um, what?
He wrote the majority opinion in Pioneer Hi-bred International v. J.E.M. Ag Supply, Farm Advantage, et al, [2001], which legally justified this whole mess.
Here’s a link to an analysis of the decision [a bit on the technical side]: http://www.cropchoice.com/leadstrya594.html?recid=540



report abuse
 

Cecelia

posted July 14, 2010 at 1:27 pm


Rod given your attraction to disasters a’comin – I am so shocked that you are unaware of a real potential disaster – Monsanto and especially the seed saving issue. I am so with Julie on this – wise woman!
The other thing re: Monsanto is that they are rapidly becoming a monopoly re: seeds which it doesn’t take much to recognize that having one company control all seeds and distribution of seeds is not a nifty idea.



report abuse
 

Max Schadenfreude

posted July 14, 2010 at 2:01 pm


“Excommunication,
In addition to being a jerk, you’re an ignorant one.”
I suspect that even if he undergoes the substantial change from ingnorant to informed, he’ll still suffer from the accidents of “asshole”.
Captcha: skimmed venereal



report abuse
 

David

posted July 14, 2010 at 5:19 pm


Monsanto is getting seed from USA seed reserves, with our governments blessing, and patening the seeds so it will be very difficult in the future getting any organic seed. Their geneticly enginered seed blows onto property of farmers who do not use Monsanto seed. Monsanto sues and always wins in US courts. America needs to wake up to what our Government has done to the people on so many levels. I now believe that it is irreversable.May God have Mercy on America, the once beautiful.



report abuse
 

stefanie

posted July 14, 2010 at 5:53 pm


According to this cardiologist (http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/2010/05/in-search-of-wheat.html), the wheat we eat today is *already* radically different from that eaten in Biblical times.



report abuse
 

Erin Manning

posted July 14, 2010 at 5:58 pm


Helen, I know this may or may not be possible for your sister, but has she ever considered the possibility of serving as an Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion at her parish? As an EMHC she could be one of those who offers the Precious Blood to the people, and in this way could not only make sure the chalice from which she is partaking is kept free from gluten, but would also be partaking of it first, so that no introduction of gluten particles from other communicants would be possible.
I know some celiac sufferers can’t tolerate wine, either, for different reasons, though, so she’d probably need to make sure she could ingest ordinary wine before trying this.



report abuse
 

Mont D. Law

posted July 14, 2010 at 7:40 pm


I heard somewhere recently that weeds were developing resistance to Roundup.



report abuse
 

MH

posted July 14, 2010 at 7:40 pm


If Excommunication starts a blog I’d like to read it. I have a soft spot for crazy religious tracts, manifestos, and street preachers.
On topic. If God is who they claim he is, then he shouldn’t have an issue with transubstantiating pretty much anything into anything else. So I think GM and the glutton free bread would be a non-issue. I invite those more versed in Christian theology to prove me wrong, but I demand a falsifiable test before I concede defeat.



report abuse
 

BCS

posted July 14, 2010 at 7:51 pm


This makes no sense. God likes wheat, but not rice? Quinoa? Also, everyone really needs to educate themselves about Celiac Disease. I was amazed when I found out my wife was a celiac, and I was amazed at the change after getting her off of the wheat diet. Even a TINY, TINY amount of wheat in the system can provoke a trip to the hospital. Do you make pasta? After you finishing straining the pasta in the colander, look at the inside surface of it. You will see a kind of sticky substance that coats whatever the pasta was put into. Even just a touch of that might send her to the hospital. I have known so many people in my life that always had digestive issues and could never seem to put them down. I don’t know for sure how many were celiacs, but I have had my EYES OPENED. The Catholic Church needs to get with it. It doesn’t matter what bullshit “reasons” you have, they are all made up anyway. And now you are going to deprive people of redemption because you think God doesn’t like RICE? Sorry, but that is the height of stupidity. God is not amused.



report abuse
 

Rita B.

posted July 14, 2010 at 8:07 pm


WHO WILL CRY FOR YOU, AMERICA ?
I, will cry you a river
And much much more
My dear dear America,
Once so beautiful !
You sold your soul
To a bunch of mercenaries
Which entered your sheep-fold
As wolves and goats
You sold your skin
To the highest bidder
You resemble a harlot
The new Babylon
Eating and drinking
With the rich of this world
Prostituting yourself
For money and power
And became a den
Of thieves and murderers
You forgot all about
The One Who blessed
You so abundantly
Biting the Hand of the Blesser
Embarrassed to mention His Name !
Did He not teach you
To be wise as a serpent
And harmless as a dove
Why then do you behave
As a silly goose ??
He invited you to His dinner Table
He so diligently prepared
But, you made light of it
And went your worldly, haughty ways
One to his farm,
Another to his business.
But as the Father of Fathers
He waits for your return
The return of His prodigal daughter
WAKE UP, AMERICA !!!
Humble your pride
And follow the Way, the Life and the Truth !!!
Or, I SHALL cry you a river
A river of bloody tears
And much much more !!!
RITA B. March 19 2003



report abuse
 

kevin s.

posted July 14, 2010 at 8:11 pm


“He wrote the majority opinion in Pioneer Hi-bred International v. J.E.M. Ag Supply, Farm Advantage, et al, [2001], which legally justified this whole mess.”
I am aware of that, but it’s simply crazy to push for impeachment on those grounds.



report abuse
 

Winkyb

posted July 14, 2010 at 8:46 pm


First you must realize that not EVERYONE can take communion or required to communicate by consuming the species of bread or the species of wine. Gluten-sensitve person or celiac brittle aren’t the only Catholics with medical conditions that prevent the person from communicating. A patient who in unable to swallow cannot communicate, a person in a coma, a person lacking reason/understanding of Christ’s presence(someone severely mentally,challenged…no baby gets communion in the Roman rite). An alcoholic may feel challenged for the senses perception of the alcohol species may trigger relapse…usu just fears…many people are cured of addictions when they attend mass, confession, and communicate regularly; so much so that is is requirement in the 12-step program to have a sacramentally active spiritual life. A patient medication may interact with the alcoholic species but to date there has never been a record of any adverse event reported and the person need to employ the prudence and abstain. The Gluten-sensitive person can partake of the consecrated wine…a child is not drinking alcohol but consuming the blood of Christ…the child are not drinking a huge quanity only a sip. If all options failed you can make a spiritual communion, expressing a heartfelt desire to communicate, in prayer. It amazing how some is willing to invalidate a whole mass to accomodate an individual need…communicating is not a Right it is a gift and a privilige subject to the mandate of Jesus Christ and the Chair of Peter and its respective…it is a blessing to take communion daily…long ago you needed special permission from the Bishop to communicate with such frequency.
For the priest consumption is sufficient enough for he intercede and sacrifices on behalf of all the people, because of this, it is not critical that laity need to communicate…it is critical that the priest communicates. Laity assisting can be made an option. It is the Priest who does all for all. This fact has been forgotten but is true. So instead of sending out arrogance be thankful that we are permitted to communicate and permitted to do thus frequently among the laity.



report abuse
 

Winkyb

posted July 14, 2010 at 8:49 pm


First you must realize that not EVERYONE can take communion or required to communicate by consuming the species of bread or the species of wine. Gluten-sensitve person or celiac brittle aren’t the only Catholics with medical conditions that prevent the person from communicating. A patient who in unable to swallow cannot communicate, a person in a coma, a person lacking reason/understanding of Christ’s presence(someone severely mentally,challenged…no baby gets communion in the Roman rite). An alcoholic may feel challenged for the senses perception of the alcohol species may trigger relapse…usu just fears…many people are cured of addictions when they attend mass, confession, and communicate regularly; so much so that is is requirement in the 12-step program to have a sacramentally active spiritual life. A patient medication may interact with the alcoholic species but to date there has never been a record of any adverse event reported and the person need to employ the prudence and abstain. The Gluten-sensitive person can partake of the consecrated wine…a child is not drinking alcohol but consuming the blood of Christ…the child are not drinking a huge quanity only a sip. If all options failed you can make a spiritual communion, expressing a heartfelt desire to communicate, in prayer. It amazing how some is willing to invalidate a whole mass to accomodate an individual need…communicating is not a Right it is a gift and a privilige subject to the mandate of Jesus Christ and the Chair of Peter and its respective…it is a blessing to take communion daily…long ago you needed special permission from the Bishop to communicate with such frequency.
For the priest consumption is sufficient enough for he intercede and sacrifices on behalf of all the people, because of this, it is not critical that laity need to communicate…it is critical that the priest communicates. Laity assisting can be made an option. It is the Priest who does all for all. This fact has been forgotten but is true. So instead of sending out arrogance be thankful that we are permitted to communicate and permitted to do thus frequently among the laity.



report abuse
 

Lion

posted July 14, 2010 at 8:59 pm


Of course Monsanto and the mega-corps want to take over the world through their litigation. They want control, so that you can’t buy or sell except what they have. And therefore they do not want you to have seeds, or gardens, or anything that would make you self-sufficient. Control is the name of the new world order game.



report abuse
 

Winkyb

posted July 14, 2010 at 9:00 pm


As for the genetic crap…God will provide…the wine used in mass is not the commercial kind certain standards have to be met…it need be I guess the church will have to grow its own..the earth and its life: plants, animals, and humans were created to glorify God. I pity the fool who attempt to obstruct such praise for it is written thar the very stones will cry out…it ain’t gonna be peaceful or pretty for them and those on that day.



report abuse
 

KDPM

posted July 14, 2010 at 9:26 pm


Helen,
I have an extremely severe gluten intolerance/insensitivity – verified by medical tests. I do not have celiac, but that does not mean that the symptoms associated with my form of gluten issues are any less painful, although they are different. They are internally damaging and exposure to any amount of gluten, no matter how small, causes extraordinary pain and other symptoms for 2-3 weeks.
That said, I have experimented with the Vatican-approved low gluten hosts. My priest, God bless him and give him long life, went so far as to have a completely separate vessel for my low gluten host. I came up to receive last, he went back to the altar, WASHED HIS HANDS AGAIN, then administered the low gluten host WITH THE OPPOSITE hand than that which he had used for the gluten host. He even broke the low gluten host into half and I took less than half of it for several weeks. The experiment failed and I reacted violently, but I am certain it was not because of any risk of cross-contamination, given Father’s very careful nature.
So, we went back to what we had done before this – the separate chalice. My parish does not offer the Eucharist under both species ordinarily. My chalice is put way to the side of the one in which Father puts a small bit of the wafer/Body. The wine in my chalice never has an opportunity to have the risk of cross-contamination. During most of the Consecration it is covered. I come up to receive last and Father goes back to the altar and gets the chalice for me.
I have had this arrangement at both parishes I have attended since my diagnosis 2.5 years ago. When I am visiting another parish or when we have a guest priest, I just make an Act of Spiritual Communion. I also do this if I’m feeling under the weather so as not to expose Father. Your sister should know that an Act of Spiritual Communion has special graces as well, particularly in light of her special Cross and sacrifice. It “counts” the same, if you will, as a Sacramental Communion, according to my priest and my understanding. That has been helpful for me to learn and very comforting.
Your sister should also not have to do without cake, etc., as there are excellent gluten free resources for making even extravagant completely gluten free and homemade treats. I wish you could contact me privately so I could help her learn.
Food allergies/insensitivities/intolerances should concern all. They are increasing. Moreover, we have no idea what effect GMO foods have on the body and immune systems. They are untested. I would expect them to increase as more GMO foods are introduced into the food supply. Companies like Monsanto are not interested in studying these effects or in accurate labeling (nor is the gov’t from what I can gather).
There are also the issues of forcing GMO seeds on third world, poor, and developing nations as well as the effect of Monsanto’s forcing small farmers out of business. As an attorney, I am appalled by the strangle-hold Monsanto seems to have over the justice system in this regard – both in this nation, Canada, and others.
There is plenty to this issue to concern all. Thanks for another great post, Rod.



report abuse
 

KDPM

posted July 14, 2010 at 9:32 pm


It is probably obvious, but to be clear, I should have said gluten sensitivity or sensitivities and NOT insensitivity/insensitivities.



report abuse
 

Excommunication

posted July 14, 2010 at 11:46 pm


My blessings on you all, and my deepest thanks for your persecutions of me for my defense of the Eucharist – our Lord teaches us in Matthew 5 that:
“Blessed are they that suffer persecution for justice’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are ye when they shall revile you, and persecute you, and speak all that is evil against you, untruly, for my sake: Be glad and rejoice, for your reward is very great in heaven. For so they persecuted the prophets that were before you.”
I too feel the point of the spear through my side at the Eucharist, but instead of whining about it, I feel blessed that am granted the tiniest taste of the extreme suffering of our Saviour.
I know that it is quite stylish to adopt a touchy-feely, happy-happy joy-joy, “let’s transform faith for the man” attitude these days, instead of letting the man be transformed by faith, just as the wafer is transformed into the very flesh of Christ.
Those of us who stand up for Jesus and His Eucharist know that to some, we sound like jerks. Woe to you that call evil good, and good evil: that put darkness for light, and light for darkness: that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter. [from Isaiah 5]
Let us confess our sins, and return to the love of Christ who died for us.
Thus do I pray.
For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh judgment to himself, not discerning the body of the Lord. [First Corinthians 11]
“had vexes”



report abuse
 

meh

posted July 15, 2010 at 1:12 am


Mont D. Law: I heard somewhere recently that weeds were developing resistance to Roundup.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/04/business/energy-environment/04weed.html
Sales took off in the late 1990s, after Monsanto created its brand of Roundup Ready crops that were genetically modified to tolerate the chemical, allowing farmers to spray their fields to kill the weeds while leaving the crop unharmed. Today, Roundup Ready crops account for about 90 percent of the soybeans and 70 percent of the corn and cotton grown in the United States.
But farmers sprayed so much Roundup that weeds quickly evolved to survive it. “What we’re talking about here is Darwinian evolution in fast-forward,” Mike Owen, a weed scientist at Iowa State University, said.
Now, Roundup-resistant weeds like horseweed and giant ragweed are forcing farmers to go back to more expensive techniques that they had long ago abandoned.
Mr. Anderson, the farmer, is wrestling with a particularly tenacious species of glyphosate-resistant pest called Palmer amaranth, or pigweed, whose resistant form began seriously infesting farms in western Tennessee only last year.



report abuse
 

maggie89

posted July 15, 2010 at 1:18 am


To Whom It May Concern: There was an article (quickly withdrawn) about the holdings of the upper echelon (priests)of the Legionaires of Christ. Do the research if you dare. It will become clear what, “The Tree of Death”, looks like and the shadow it throws. The overarching theme is power. Its’ branches are the seven deadly sins. And the root of it all is the love of money.



report abuse
 

David (not the one above)

posted July 15, 2010 at 3:30 am


If ever an illustration were needed that “the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth light”, this discussion is it.



report abuse
 

MH

posted July 15, 2010 at 7:31 am


meh, since evolution is a liberal atheist fraud the weeds obviously can’t evolve resistance to round up. The weeds must have been intelligently designed by a competitor!



report abuse
 

carmen

posted July 15, 2010 at 10:02 am


if you have celiac and are catholic, you can receive the wine instead of the bread which are turn into the body of Christ.either way you receive Christ and thats what you want.



report abuse
 

Wendy McMahan

posted July 15, 2010 at 11:37 am


You can go to http://www.benedictinesisters.org and read all about how they have a new Eucharist that contains a speck of wheat that is being used for those who suffer from Celiac Disease. This is the second blog this week attacking the Church, all because they have no understnading of it. I am so tired of it. It really is offensive. It is funny how the church doen’t attack other religions, yet they all attack ours. Sad, really sad.



report abuse
 

Rod Dreher

posted July 15, 2010 at 12:01 pm


Wendy McMahan, do you really not understand that there is nothing in this blog entry attacking the Catholic Church? Nothing. Nada. Rien. Nichts. Why are you so eager to find persecution and bigotry where there isn’t the scantest evidence for it?



report abuse
 

Robert

posted July 15, 2010 at 12:19 pm


This article is funny.
1.) Ignoring the fact that after consecration, the bread isn’t bread,
any longer.
2.) The bread offered is white; and NOT Wheat.
3.) Remember, in the movie ” The Rosary Murders “, when the priest
learns in the confessional that the wine, being offered, is poisoned.
The solution: the priest leaves the confessional, and ” accidentally ” knocks the chalice out of the hands of the priest who
is the Master of Ceremonies at that particular Mass.
4.) This article clearly proves: the way one prays is how one believes.
Deo Gratias !



report abuse
 

Rod Dreher

posted July 15, 2010 at 12:29 pm


Sigh.
1. It remains bread, even after consecration. You and I believe that it is literally divine flesh, but the body of a celiac patient will digest it as bread. To put a consecrated host under the microscope will reveal it as bread. Again, you and I both believe that it mystically becomes something else (and not just a symbol, but the real thing), but it also remains bread in the purely material sense.
2. What do you think white bread is made from? Wheat!



report abuse
 

Jeff

posted July 15, 2010 at 1:44 pm


Ironicaly enough – the MATTER used in the sacrament, while critical for it to be VALID, almost palls when compared to the corruptions modern Catholics have to deal with in the messed up Novus Ordo FORM – which is corrupt in almost all vernacular masses.



report abuse
 

Kathryn Schutz

posted July 15, 2010 at 4:02 pm


Your opening statements ERR gravely because of yourignorance that there exists a “Gluten-free” Eucharistic Host (actually has 1/2 of 1% gluten, sufficient for consecration, but will not bother the most sensitive people with gluten allergies). These are approved by both Vatican and U S Bishops Conference. These are made by Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration Altar Bread Dept. in Clyde, MO (30 for $5) IF there was zero gluten, you’d be correct.
Ask yourself: Is God so helpless that He’ll let Himself be defeated by the likes of Monsanto when He’s given us the Eucharist so He can be with and in us? I suspect wine made with American Welch’s Concord (muscatine) grape juice can become the Blood of Christ as easily as that made with Vitus Vitefera. Anyone know different?
That said, I suspect the gluten allergic people will be the first to suffer from genetically altered wheat.



report abuse
 

Max Schadenfreude

posted July 15, 2010 at 4:19 pm


MH
July 15, 2010 7:31 AM
meh, since evolution is a liberal atheist fraud the weeds obviously can’t evolve resistance to round up. The weeds must have been intelligently designed by a competitor!
****
Since an organism can adapt and develop resistance to toxins the goop struck by lightening millions of years ago can in time turn into Angelina Jolie.



report abuse
 

Fr. Basil

posted July 15, 2010 at 4:20 pm


Speaking as an Orthodox Christian, if it looks like wheat, tastes like wheat, came from wheat berries originally (regardless of what they did to it), grows out of the ground like wheat, makes flour like wheat, it IS wheat and bread made from it according to the traditional recipe (flour, water, yeast, and maybe a little bit of salt) is valid matter for the Eucharistic Sacrifice.
There is a difference of opinion whether to use white, unbleached, or whole wheat flour to make the prosphora. While I feel that whole wheat bread is more nourishing physically and therefore more appropriate to become the Body of Christ, I’ve never had any luck with it.
The idea is to use the best ingredients you have available.
If GMO wheat–or yeast–or wine–is the best you have, then use it in clear consicience.



report abuse
 

Max Schadenfreude

posted July 15, 2010 at 4:25 pm


“so much so that is is requirement in the 12-step program to have a sacramentally active spiritual life.”
There is no such sacramental requirement in the 12 Step model of recovery.



report abuse
 

Max Schadenfreude

posted July 15, 2010 at 4:29 pm


“Through the Miracle of Transubstantiation, the Bread becomes Flesh, and NO GLUTEN REMAINS. Those who reject this have earned excommunication through their lack of faith and discernment.”
“Excommunication”, if you brush up on your Aristotle and Aquinas you’ll recall that while the substance of the bread and wine become the body, blood, and divinity of Christ, the accidents of bread and wine remain.
Thus, one can still get drunk on what was once wine, and one can still have a nasty reaction to what was once bread.
Certainly you don’t seek to excommunicate St. Thomas Aquinas, do you?



report abuse
 

MH

posted July 15, 2010 at 4:35 pm


Max, but could the rest of us by chance develop resistance to the bad films (Beowulf, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Lara Croft: Tomb Raider) that would result?
I think not. So our ability to view bad movies without going insane must be by design.



report abuse
 

Winkyb

posted July 15, 2010 at 6:51 pm


DULY NOTED, max shad, the point being…12-step program has a spiritual component to its program…the point made: for Catholics, in particular, that you have obviously missed…is the healing of body and soul is linked to an active sacramental life…a life connected directly to Christ and His Presence…so to a practicing Catholic, a spiritual process lacking Christ, His sacraments, His Presence would be considered bogus and inept.



report abuse
 

silentbeep

posted July 15, 2010 at 8:02 pm


Spare you the complaints? Get this: gluten makes some people quite sick. This isn’t an issue of “gee I just don’t feel like eating gluten bread” some people eat gluten-free things for an actual health reason. This is a health concern, not just about wanting to whine, argue and be rebellious.
I am not saying that the church must change this rule because it’s not canonical law or some such thing, all I am saying, is that gluten can affect people negatively. Now if the church wants to tell Catholics with severe gluten sensitvity, too bad eat the wafer as is anyway. that’s another issue. I’m just telling you that gluten sensitivity is not a petty concern that you need to be ‘spared’ from.
Abdominal pain, gas, bloating and diarrhea are not “parochial” concerns.



report abuse
 

Rod Dreher

posted July 15, 2010 at 8:21 pm


Silentbeep, re-read the post. I wasn’t addressing celiac sufferers; I was trying to pre-empt people whose response would be to complain that Catholics and Orthodox who worried about whether or not GMO wheat was ritually pure were being ridiculous. You got cheesed off at me because you misread what I wrote.



report abuse
 

Jessie

posted July 15, 2010 at 9:18 pm


I think the issue here is that, for a sacrament to be valid, the matter, form, and intention must be correct. I don’t believe that wheat that has had its genetic make up meddled with by man can really be called proper matter. The Church uses wheat because Christ himself chose to use wheat. He did not use genetically modified wheat.
As to the question of the gluten content in the wheat, perhaps it would be permissible to use spelt flour. Spelt is an ancient form of wheat which has much less gluten than the wheat that we use today.



report abuse
 

meh

posted July 15, 2010 at 10:58 pm


Max Schadenfreude: “Since an organism can adapt and develop resistance to toxins the goop struck by lightening millions of years ago can in time turn into Angelina Jolie.”
And to goop she shall return.
http://www.southparkstudios.com/clips/155535/



report abuse
 

Hank Morrissey

posted July 15, 2010 at 11:00 pm


I am allegic to gluten. So I don’t eat wheat or gluten. But I receive my Lord Jesus every day. The accidents of bread and wine remain; that merely means that with our bodily eyes Jesus will still appear as the offered gifts. (usually-sometimes God let’s us see His son) Nevertheless, by the power of the Holy spirit, when a priest consecrates the bread and wine they become the body and blood of our Lord. Period. The Eucharist is Jesus Christ- body and blood, soul and divinity. I invite you to read books on the many Eucharistic miracles. St. Alexandrina is one of my favorites, she fasted on the Eucharist alone for thirteen years- 30 days of which she was confined and observed by scientists who testified there was no metaphysical or biological explanation for the occurrence. We also recognize Cbrist- true God and true man- to have a blood type of AB. We know this from a Host that broke and had blood poured out which was later tested and found to be real. Many have to answer for the body and blood of the Lord for wasting time with silly arguments like these. -For His flesh is true food, and His blood is true drink. (John 6) Let me repeat, I am allergic to gluten. I receive my Jesus in Holy Communion daily.



report abuse
 

Winkyb

posted July 16, 2010 at 2:59 am


Rod…please review Hank’s response. It is not “just bread” and “not just wine”.



report abuse
 

Excommunication

posted July 16, 2010 at 8:59 am


As a saint, Aquinas is holy but not perfect: the sound an unconsecrated wafer makes when dropped onto a hard surface is a clatter, but the sound of dropped flesh is a splat – meaning that the ears are also fooled in the minds of those who reject transubstantiation.
And as far as attacking the saints goes, “Monsanto”?? I’m no linguist, but doesn’t “Mon santo” mean something like “my saint”?
Meaning that the fallen Catholic Rod’s attack on “Monsanto” is a thinly veiled attack on my saint?
“wife mortar”



report abuse
 

Dflann

posted July 16, 2010 at 1:41 pm


In response to “Excommunition” and going along with Hank’s reply, the bread and wine, once consecrated into the body and blood of Christ, do not taste, look, feel or sound like flesh and blood. At consecration, the substance of the bread and wine are changed into the flesh and blood of Christ while maintaining the accidents of bread and wine. Saying that there is a physical change is not the best language to use when discussing the Eucharist-substance is a better word.
One must ultimately have faith to believe in the Eucharist. To have faith is to believe even when one does not fully understand. Read the Gospel of John, chapter 6 for more information on the Eucharist in Holy Scripture.



report abuse
 

fotis

posted February 1, 2012 at 7:18 am


i am doctror and i have son 5 years old with celiac disease and i am orthodox

i think this is the best solution for people who suffer from c.d

because such wheat will help them be healthy (essential

vitamins ) insteast of medicines

the Church may stop collect money for jesus!



report abuse
 

Your Name

posted May 29, 2012 at 9:40 pm


I am totally disgusted with Monsanto. I’m embarking on the impossible task of removing all Monsanto products from my life. I know many farmers have to use Monsanto seed so I’m conflicted in looking for strictly non-Monsanto seed farmers, but I think its the right thing to do. I’m having a very hard time finding any white soybeans on the market that were not grown with Monsanto seed. I think corn will be a difficult one too.



report abuse
 

irregoitere

posted May 6, 2013 at 1:17 pm


End up in the important points of your residence owner’s protection. Residence owner’s insurance plan can cover various types of loss, however, you won’t understand specifically what’s included in your policy until you ask. Some guidelines cover gear along with other products whilst they have been in transportation, yet others don’t. Don’t take a risk on your coverage — make sure you are aware of the every detail of your respective coverage. Should you be one of several individuals affected by back problems who didn’t know there have been effortless remedies within reach, with any luck , at this point you know that you have things you can do to reduce your soreness. Use the following tips in your lifetime today to lessen and reduce pain, and feel better.Look Fantastic With These New Beauty Tips Should your youngsters have asthma attack or hives, they might actually have specific food allergic reaction. You should go to a doctor and do the required checks to find out when they are sensitive to some thing then, make sure they keep away from that specific foods, when they grow to be hypersensitive. Ensure you possess the proper illumination before you take an image. Lighting is possibly the most important factor in creating a good monochrome picture, because it impacts the texture, contrast and form of the picture. Area lights can develop some extraordinary photographs since it generates shadows and illustrates the sides of shapes. Put in a burglar alarm system at your residence. Not only will it make you and your family feel more secure and offer your house some included safety from probable criminals, you will also learn that it always reduces your usual home insurance costs. It can in fact end up saving you around 20Percent. The best websites available increase without chemicals in acceptance, within the sensation their reputation is grass-roots instead of necessarily constantly acquired by way of subsidized promoting. You will discover ways to also work to grow your website without chemicals by utilizing the excellent seo suggestions (SEO) inside the text message listed below.



report abuse
 

LaKDenueanaer

posted May 6, 2013 at 1:33 pm


The expense of your vehicle insurance is going to be influenced by the quantity of seat tickets and details on the driving history. To obtain your very best amount, you have to hold back until your driving history is apparent and then search for a new vehicle insurance service provider. The charge is going to be drastically reduced you are going to save a whole lot on the costs. A means to keep your vision shadow from creasing, just as much essential oil as you can needs to be eliminated through your eyelids. It is possible to do using a pushed natural powder or and eyesight shadow foundation before applying the color. These help process any skin oils around the eyelids whilst keeping the eye shadow from creasing. Be thrifty together with your individual financial. While experiencing a new auto seems tempting, when you push it away the whole lot it drops a huge amount of importance. Sometimes you can aquire a used car in good otherwise better issue for any much lower value. You will save huge and still have an incredible vehicle. Expand plant life from seed rather than acquiring vegetation from a nursery. It could be luring to acquire vegetation that currently have a jump start, yet it is usually not required. By increasing from seed, you could find your self landscape design your garden for under $50.00 worth of diverse plant seeds, as an alternative to investing 100s or even 1000s of dollars at the grow nursery. Don’t be satisfied with perspiration trousers and t-shirts, gown up daily. The more you practice a nicely created look, the better all-natural it would really feel as well as the far better you will be at setting up an outfit that reveals your style. You need to appearance amazing, and one never knows the person you may well run into! Diversion can be the solution to your anxiety attack. Should you quit centering on the cause of the attack and distract your self with your favorite exercise, it will enable your imagination to unwind by means of diversion. Your adrenals will gradual their creation and your process will quickly personal normalize again.



report abuse
 

Bremitoerruct

posted May 12, 2013 at 6:29 am


Look for a lender that gives totally free financial savings and checking profiles. Check around and choose an organization that works frequently with college students and doesn’t charge additional for a variety of little things. Ask questions and learn whenever you can lender on-line to help you control your hard earned dollars after it is hassle-free for you. If you work with video clips as an element of your marketing campaign, tightly check all comments and answer rapidly. Frequently other internet marketers will article a video review to your site. Make a decision swiftly if you are going to enable those forms of comments being put on your Youtube . com site. Salt absorption performs an important part in muscles progress, so ensure that you are obtaining adequate. Sodium can improve the way that your whole body stores carbohydrate food and takes up amino acids. It also helps make the muscle tissues far more sensitive to insulin. You want your muscles to take action if you workout, and serving them the best stability of vitamins is an important part. Should you suffer from panic and anxiety attacks frequently and can’t often gain control of them, you may need a little extra help. Speak with your medical doctor about the option for medicine. There are lots of medications that may minimize the thoughts of anxiety that frequently trigger anxiety and panic attacks. Don’t hesitate to test them. Security password shield your product. This is often a good way to maintain prying view away from your information as well as your iPad. Imagine a pass word it is possible to remember, and ensure that it must be not the identical password as being the one particular you utilize all over the place in addition. Write it down so that you can get it should you neglect. When purchasing insurance, may it be for your residence, your vehicle, or even on a dog, attempt to determine if the corporation offers any kind of bundling discount. Lots of periods in case you have several different plans, say renter’s insurance coverage and vehicle insurance, you will definately get marked down on. For condominium residents generally renter’s insurance plans are required, so wondering this inquiry is tantamount to assured cost savings. By using summary, bundle and save money!



report abuse
 

Anastasios

posted April 29, 2014 at 6:48 pm


Does the Ethiopian Orthodox Church use teff for the Eucharist? (I doubt they do, but you never know. Wheat isn’t widely grown in Ethiopia, but teff is). If so, that might be an option.

Why not just call another ecumenical council? If the problem is canon law not allowing non-wheat hosts, then all that is needed is a council to change things and allow teff (etc.) to be used if necessary.



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

Another blog to enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Rod Dreher. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here is another blog you may also enjoy: Most Recent Scientology Story on Beliefnet! Happy Reading!!!

posted 3:25:02pm Aug. 27, 2012 | read full post »

Mommy explains her plastic surgery
In Dallas (naturally), a parenting magazine discusses how easy it is for mommies who don't like their post-child bodies to get surgery -- and to have it financed! -- to reverse the effects of time and childbirth. Don't like what nursing has done to your na-nas? Doc has just the solution: Doctors say

posted 10:00:56pm Jul. 21, 2010 | read full post »

Why I became Orthodox
Wrapping up my four Beliefnet years, I was thinking about the posts that attracted the most attention and comment in that time. Without a doubt the most popular (in terms of attracting attention, not all of it admiring, to be sure) was the October 12, 2006, entry in which I revealed and explained wh

posted 9:46:58pm Jul. 21, 2010 | read full post »

Modern Calvinists
Wow, they don't make Presbyterians like they used to!

posted 8:47:01pm Jul. 21, 2010 | read full post »

'Rape by deception'? Huh?
The BBC this morning reported on a bizarre case in Israel of an Arab man convicted of "rape by deception," because he'd led the Jewish woman with whom he'd had consensual sex to believe he was Jewish. Ha'aretz has the story here. Plainly it's a racist verdict, and a bizarre one -- but there's more t

posted 7:51:28pm Jul. 21, 2010 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.