Mark D. Roberts

Mark D. Roberts


Sunday Inspiration from The High Calling

posted by Mark D. Roberts

Is Pride Always Wrong?

READ Isaiah 23:1-18

The LORD of Heaven’s Armies has done it
to destroy your pride
and bring low all earth’s nobility.

Isaiah 23:9

Once again, Isaiah condemns human pride. In Isaiah 22, the pride of a leader was indicted by the Lord. This time it’s the pride of a whole nation.
Years ago when I was a college pastor, I led a Bible study on a passage that identified pride as sinful. One of my students interrupted me by asking: “What’s so wrong about pride? I thought we were supposed to take pride in ourselves. What’s so bad about feeling good about the things I have accomplished?” At the time, I was unprepared for such a blunt question. But I’ve thought about it for years since then. When, if ever, is pride okay? When is it sinful?
In part, I think the rightness or wrongness of pride depends on what happens in the heart of the individual. Sinful pride takes way too much credit, forgetting God’s grace and gifts. Sinful pride says, “I did it! I am great!” Yet there’s another quality of pride that is mixed with humility and gratitude. This sort of pride says, “I did it, by God’s grace! I did it! How blessed I am!” It’s the kind of pride we hear when Paul writes to the Philippians: “For I can do everything through Christ, who gives me strength” (4:13). The emphasis here is not upon “I can do everything,” but rather upon “through Christ, who gives me strength.” Such pride is consistent with the command of Scripture: “If you want to boast, boast only in the Lord” (1 Cor. 1:31).
QUESTIONS FOR REFLECTION: When you feel pride, what happens in your soul? Does your pride draw you near to God in humility and gratitude? Or does your pride lead you away from God as you glory in yourself?
PRAYER: Dear Lord, you know my heart. You know what happens in me when I feel proud. Forgive me, Lord, when my pride is selfish, when I take credit for that which comes from your grace in my life. Help me to see myself and my accomplishments in the clear light of your truth. Whether I feel pride because the lawn I just mowed looks good, or because I’ve contributed to the work of your kingdom, may my feelings of pride be marinated in humble gratitude. Let me live each day, thankful for how you are at work through me, yet continuously aware of just how much I depend on you in all things.  Above all, may you be my pride and joy. When I boast, may I boast in you! Amen.
Daily Reflections from The High Calling.org
This devotional comes from The High Calling of Our Daily Work (www.thehighcalling.org). You can read my Daily Reflections there, or sign up to have them sent to your email inbox each day. This website contains lots of encouragement for people who are trying to live out their faith in the workplace.
high calling daily reflection



Advertisement
Comments Post the First Comment »
post a comment

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

More blogs to enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Mark D. Roberts. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Red Letters with Tom Davis Recent prayer post on Prayables Most Recent Inspiration blog post Happy Reading!  

posted 2:09:11pm Aug. 27, 2012 | read full post »

Why Did Jesus Have to Die? Conclusions
In this series on the death of Jesus, I have presented four different perspectives on why Jesus had to die: Roman, Jewish, Jesus’, and Early Christian. I believe that each of these points of view has merit, and that we cannot fully understand the necessity of Jesus’ death without taking them all

posted 2:47:39am Apr. 11, 2011 | read full post »

Sunday Inspiration from the High Calling
Can We Find God in the City? Psalm 48:1-14 Go, inspect the city of Jerusalem. Walk around and count the many towers. Take note of the fortified walls, and tour all the citadels, that you may describe them to future generations. For that is what God is like. He is our God forever and ever,

posted 2:05:51am Apr. 10, 2011 | read full post »

Why Did Jesus Have to Die? The Perspective of the First Christians, Part 3
An Act and Symbol of Love Perhaps one of the most startling of the early Christian interpretations of the cross was that it was all about love. It’s easy in our day, when crosses are religious symbols, attractive ornaments, and trendy jewelry to associate the cross with love. But, in the first

posted 2:41:47am Apr. 08, 2011 | read full post »

Why Did Jesus Have to Die? The Perspective of the First Christians, Part 2
The Means of Reconciliation In my last post, I examined one of the very earliest Christian statements of the purpose of Jesus’ death. According to the tradition encapsulated in 1 Corinthians 15, Jesus died “for our sins in accordance with the scriptures” (15:3). Yet this text doesn’t expl

posted 2:30:03am Apr. 07, 2011 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.