Good Days…Bad Days With Maureen Pratt

Good Days…Bad Days With Maureen Pratt

Prayer for Caregivers of People with Alzheimer’s Disease

posted by mpratt
Image courtesy of dan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of dan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Lord, I pray today for the people who care for men and women with Alzheimer’s disease. You know how hard their work is, how scant their resources, and how heavy their burdens. Perhaps tending to the needs of a stranger, perhaps caring tirelessly for a loved one they have known for years, their hearts are, at times, filled with sorrow and at other times delighted by the glimmers of who once was but is no more. Indeed, the person they care for is slipping away, unable to be what they once were or act as they once did, and this makes the life of the caregiver that much more difficult.

Please, Lord, be close by when these caregivers need your comfort and strength. Fill their hearts with your goodness and solace, and their souls with love. Help them to find ways to rest and take care of themselves. And let them be heartened each day, lifted each day, and loved each day as they love the person who is no longer as they once were, but who is nonetheless your child, worthy of dignity and respect.

I pray this in Jesus’ name,

Amen

Maureen Pratt

Alzheimer’s Foundation 2014 Candlelighting Event

posted by mpratt
Image courtesy of nuchylee/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of nuchylee/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The weekend of November 15-17, 2014, will again be the time when groups and individuals affected by Alzheimer’s disease may commemorate their and their loved ones’  journey through the Alzheimer’s Foundation National Candlelighting Event.   There will be events throughout the U.S., but also an opportunity to light a cyber candle on the Alzheimer’s Foundation website. To read more about the event, go to: http://www.candlelighting.org/

The image of light serves many purposes in religious and non-religious contexts. It conveys  a sense of wonder, power, and warmth, and provides a practical purpose in our lives: giving the ability to see in the darkness.

Light is also very active – the flame of a candle, though rooted to the wick, dances and sways in its environment. As long as there is air and wick, the light of a candle will remain lit, alive, and give illumination.

Another very potent aspect of light is that we have the power to extinguish it. Yes, wind can do this. And a candle flame can run out of wick and sputter and die. But we have at our fingertips or by our very breath the ability to snuff out even the most blazing light, and by doing so, snuff out the illumination it gives, too.

Remembering with candlelight those who live now and those who have passed on, who have been affected by Alzheimer’s disease, is a wonderful way to reinforce the affect that their fight, commitment, and strength have on us. It is also a wonderful way to say, “Yes, we are with you – and we will help keep the light burning, the illumination upon the cause, even as we keep you in our hearts and prayers.”

Blessings for the day,

Maureen

 

Feeling Like a Failure?

posted by mpratt
Image courtesy of Tina Phillips/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Tina Phillips/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

At some point in a life with chronic illness and pain, we feel as if we’ve failed. Failed at keeping healthier. Failed at following doctor’s orders. Failed at relationships. Failed at life. No matter how many reassurances we get from friends and family, and no matter how much we tell ourselves that there are “extenuating circumstances,” the sharp stab of inadequacy can really hit us, and hit us hard.

I suppose this difficult feeling of being a failure is part of life, especially part of a life fraught with health problems. But that doesn’t make it any easier. And as we go along through more years of illness and pain, the burdens seem all that much more heavy upon our fragile shoulders.

If you’ve read even a smattering of my blogs, here, you know that I fully acknowledge there are “good days” and “bad days” with illness. I hope you also realize that my faith transcends these two categories of describing daily life with lupus, etc. – I don’t believe the bad days, especially, are brought from God to punish or chide or even necessarily challenge. For me, it’s just very simple: there are good days and bad days for us all, and the point is not so much that we rest in them, but it is what we do with them that matters.

So, on those bad days, when we are tempted to chide ourselves and slap the “failure” label all over ourselves, I have to apply the same way of thinking. That is, we are human and life with chronic illnesses and pain is not a linear proposition. We will triumph (“good days”), but we will also stumble (“bad days”). We will sail through some storms, and feel pummeled in others. But, as long as we believe that God loves us, cares for us, and forgives us completely, how can we believe we are failures?

Sometimes, we might feel as if we’ve failed. But, at those times, if we focus instead on God’s goodness and the hand He extends to lift us up, that feeling of failure will dissipate into His unconditional love, giving us renewed strength for the next leg of our journey.

Blessings for the day,
Maureen

 

Seeking a Mentor

posted by mpratt

Maureen Pratt Author PicWhen I was first diagnosed with lupus, I asked my doctor if she thought that joining a support group would be a good idea for me. She hesitated, then said, “No. There will be people who are depressed, negative, and very, very ill. You don’t need that kind of atmosphere.”

I was surprised. From what I had heard prior to my diagnosis, patient support groups were good places, where people could seek support, encouragement, and information.

A few weeks later, with my flare raging and all sorts of emotions and questions swirling in my head and heart, I located a support group for lupus patients and went, a little scared, to a meeting tucked in a community room at a local mall. There were two patients who were negative, angry, and who painted an awful picture of my future life with lupus. But, there was also the group leader – a positive, gentle, encouraging woman who had battled many awful flares, but whose spirit had not suffered. She took me under her wing, and we’ve been friends ever since. Most special, she has been a tremendous mentor as my life with the disease has unfurled.

Distinctive from being merely a friend, a mentor is, ideally, someone with more experience, cultivated wisdom, and the desire to assist others who are not quite as far along in their health journeys.  He or she is the person to whom you can go with the “what do I do now?” or “how do I sort this out?” questions that inevitably arise.  A mentor is a marvel! And a true treasure.

I’m glad that I went to that support group. I totally understand what my doctor meant by discouraging me from going, but if I hadn’t made the effort, I would not have found the mentor who’s been so very, very wonderful.

Whatever stage of your health-challenged journey, keep your eyes open for that special person who has been where you are, understands, and is willing and eager to give you just the inspiration – of a human kind – that you need. You’ll be so glad you did!

Blessings for the day,

Maureen

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