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For Bible Study Nerds

For Bible Study Nerds

Bible Resource Spotlight: 100 Tough Questions about God and the Bible

Reader Appeal: Students, Bible Study Groups, Families

Genre: Bible Reference

FBSN Rating: B+

“God made Eve from Adam’s rib. Are you ribbing me?”

“The Bible says ‘sons of God’ had sex with human women, who gave birth to giants. Doesn’t that sound a little like Greek mythology?”

“Why did Jesus seem to paint God as a genie waiting in heaven to grant our every wish?

“Who should we believe about grounds for divorce? Moses, Jesus, or Paul? They each gave different advice.”

If these questions sound similar to ones you’ve asked yourself—or been asked by others—then you’re ready for 100 Tough Questions about God and the Bible by Stephen M. Miller. If you’re the kind who never questions God or the Bible, well then you need this book even more. Stephen Miller is a theologian with a journalist’s training, and this book shows that kind of evenhanded thinking all the way through. You may not always agree with his conclusions, but he will always give you a clear, concise, understandable discussion of the differing opinions on matters of theology, morality, historicity, reliability, and interpretations of Scriptural conundrums. Miller excels at offering unique perspectives on the Bible, often challenging and encouraging readers at the same time.

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The problem with any kind of book like this, of course, is that it purports to have all the answers to the hard questions of the Christian faith. No one has the kind of expansive reach, not the lauded Mr. Miller, not your homegrown pastor, not even you or me. Plus, depending on your denominational or political perspective, you may disagree with some of the answers that Miller recommends. Still, the great benefit of a book like this is that it gets us all thinking deeply about the faith and our foundations—encouraging lively discussions among friends, family, parents and kids, coworkers and more. For that reason, 100 Tough Questions about God and the Bible is a valuable book to have in your library. Let it be a catalyst to helping you, and those you love, begin forming your own opinions about eternal subjects.

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100 Tough Questions about God and the Bible

100 Tough Questions about God and the Bible by Stephen M. Miller

(Bethany House)

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About: For Bible Study Nerds™

About: Mike Nappa

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