For Bible Study Nerds

For Bible Study Nerds

About: For Bible Study Nerds™

“Look closer. Dig deeper. Understand better.”

Mike NappaFor Bible Study Nerds™ with Mike Nappa is a weekly column that takes a closer look at moments from Jesus’ life and teachings that are recorded in the New Testament, offering relevant, short-take insights to help us better understand the truth on display there.

In here you can—and will—rediscover Jesus in surprising, fresh, new ways.

Drawing from a broad spectrum of trusted biblical scholarship, and incorporating over a dozen different commentary styles into the content segments, this blog is designed to help us all to look closer, dig deeper, and understand better what it means to know and follow Jesus. A blog post could include:

• Archaeological insights

• Bible difficulties

• Cross-reference comparisons

• Cultural commentary

• Factual info (weights, measures, facts and figures…)

• Geographical backgrounds

• Historical backgrounds

• Inductive studies

• Literary influences

• Personality and character studies

• Symbolic meanings

• Theological commentary

• Word studies

• and more.

Every “short-take” segment in this column is designed to shed new light on Scripture in a way that’s relevant, interesting, and easy to read. Sources for each segment are also included, with a complete, regularly updated bibliography of works cited available online.

How Will You Use For Bible Study Nerds?

• As personal devotions.

• As a study resource for small group Bible discussions.

• As a catalyst for conversation during family devotions.

• As a couples’ Bible study reference.

• As a resource for Sunday school classes, youth groups, and teacher training in churches.

• As a reference for preaching, teaching, and mentoring.

• As a listener’s supplement to a pastor’s sermon, or to a Bible teacher’s lecture.

• As textbook add-ons for a Bible class.

• As a discipling resource for one-on-one Bible study.

• As research and reference information for writing and speaking.

• As an interesting, spiritually fulfilling way to pass “waiting time” during the day.

Basically, if you’re a lifelong learner who loves Jesus, then be happy! For Bible Study Nerds is just for you.

(Dorky plastic eyewear is optional.)

Questions?

About: Mike Nappa

Contact Mike

Works Cited

“For Bible Study Nerds” is a trademark of Nappaland Communications Inc. All rights reserved. 
Previous Posts

Matthew 7:7-12; Ask, Seek, Knock (Literary Influences)
Found where it in Matthew 7:12, the “Golden Rule” seems an awkward contextual placement. In modern Bibles, it’s lumped in with Matthew 7:7-11, appearing as the final sentence in this section of Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount. This is particularly perplexing because verse 12 in the NIV begins wit

posted 12:00:54pm Nov. 21, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 7:7-12; Ask, Seek, Knock (Cultural Commentary)
Jesus frequently pointed to God’s place as our Father to emphasize the idea that God cares for us—but that imagery meant something different to his first-century hearers than it does to our so-called “progressive” 21st-century culture. In today’s American culture, the father is importan

posted 12:00:53pm Nov. 19, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 7:7-12; Ask, Seek, Knock (Theological Commentary)
Jesus’ exhortation to “ask, seek, knock” in prayer seems a carte blanche promise that God will give anything you or I ask for in prayer. The normal Christian life, on the other hand, seems to discredit this promise on a daily basis. So what gives? Was Jesus lying, or mistaken, or exaggerati

posted 12:00:51pm Nov. 17, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 7:1-6; Judging Others (Symbolism)
OK, brace yourself Bible Study Nerd, because this commentary section is going to be longer than normal. You’ve been warned. “Do not give dogs what is sacred; do not throw your pearls to pigs…” What the heck does that mean? Jesus’ words in Matthew 7:6 are difficult to follow given th

posted 12:00:40pm Nov. 14, 2014 | read full post »

Matthew 7:1-6; Judging Others (Rhetorical Influences)
It would've been hard to be a Pharisee sitting in the audience of Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount. Again and again Christ seemed to deliberately antagonize any religious leaders listening to his teaching—singling them out, calling them unflattering names, and mocking them with increasingly absurd ins

posted 12:00:00pm Nov. 12, 2014 | read full post »


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