The Deacon's Bench

The Deacon's Bench


Romeward bound? Baltimore Episcopal parish may join Catholic Church

posted by jmcgee

Some dramatic news out of Maryland:

In a letter to parishioners, the Reverend Jason Cantania, rector of Mount Calvary Episcopal Church in Baltimore, Maryland, announced that the vestry of the parish had voted unanimously in favor of two resolutions. First, they have voted to leave The Episcopal Church (TEC) where they are a part of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland, and, second, to become an Anglican Use parish in the Catholic Church through the new initiative from Rome – the Anglicorum Coetibus.

Under the terms of this apostolic constitution, the Church has provided opportunities for “personal ordinariates for Anglicans entering full communion with the Catholic Church.” As an Anglican Use parish, they will be authorized to use an authorized version of the Episcopal Church’s Book of Common Prayer called the “Book of Divine Worship.”

Mount Calvary Episcopal Church, founded in 1842, is located in the heart of the city of Baltimore. On their website they describe themselves as a parish that has “borne faithful witness to the essential truth of Catholic Christianity and the tradition of the Oxford Movement for over 150 years, and remains to this day a bulwark of orthodox Anglo-Catholic practice.

Read on. The entire parish will reportedly vote on joining the Catholic Church later this month.



Advertisement
Comments read comments(11)
post a comment
Eugene Pagano

posted October 4, 2010 at 4:27 pm


I have swum the Tiber in the other direction. The news may seem dramatic to you, but your church (my former church) has its own problems. Don’t chortle too much.
“The diocese [of Brooklyn] is struggling under a mound of debt, and its drop in parishioners reflects a statewide decrease.
The number of self-identified Catholics in the state [of NY] has dropped to 37% from 44% in 1990.”
http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2010/10/04/2010-10-04_prayer_for_bklynqns_churches.html
Some of the same issues that are leading some Episcopalians to go the Roman Catholic Church are leading some ROman Catholics to go the other way:
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/12/29/us/changes-in-episcopal-church-spur-some-to-join-some-to-go.html?scp=15&sq=catholic+episcopalian&st=nyt



report abuse
 

Michael

posted October 4, 2010 at 4:51 pm


“The news may seem dramatic to you, but your church (my former church) has its own problems. Don’t chortle too much.”
CNN, Times, and, of course, many posters here are quite happy to point that out.
“Some of the same issues that are leading some Episcopalians to go the Roman Catholic Church are leading some ROman Catholics to go the other way”
I think that’s the point.



report abuse
 

rick in oz

posted October 4, 2010 at 5:27 pm


I always enjoy the effort some put into trying to find any thing and or every thing that is wrong with a situation. This story is no different than many others. I believe that most Catholics even in our dwindling numbers are glad to see others return to the faith.As a convert myself I know that any faith is only as good as the person practicing makes it.



report abuse
 

Fred

posted October 4, 2010 at 6:20 pm


“Some of the same issues that are leading some Episcopalians to go the Roman Catholic Church are leading some ROman Catholics to go the other way:”
Perhaps, but after reading the article you linked it seems that one direction seems to be swam by those who a see a church refusing to follow current social trends, while the other seems to be swam by those who see a church deviating from sound doctrine.
I make that statement primarily because the quotes in the article you linked of former Catholics include phrases like “embrace inclusivity” [gotta wonder what that even means, as well as how they understand the goats/sheep and wheat/chaff thing] and lots of use of variants of “I feel,” in addition to some sort of idea that a refusal to accept a person’s views as true (for whatever reason) is tantamount to not caring about the person.
There are few quotes by former Episcopalians, but those that I found said they were unhappy with a departure from truth. Perhaps I’m being unfair, but that’s what I read.



report abuse
 

Vince Brandolini

posted October 4, 2010 at 6:31 pm


Mr. Pagano, that 2nd article you reference is most enlightening. Perhaps one phrase says is best:
“…many from Roman Catholic churches, who say they want to belong to a church that regards inclusivity as a Christian virtue.”
Trouble is, ‘inclusivity’ with regards to lifestyles (or any act of free will, for that matter) was never a “Christian Virtue”. Christ Himself, the apostles, the early Church Fathers – none was in the least bit tolerant of any such deviancy from the natural order.
So what this article seems to be saying is that those who really wish to follow Christ are coming to Rome. Those who wish to follow something else – the fake Christ they fabricated in their own image and likeness – are going Episcopal. And quite possibly somewhere else as well, might I add.
If this constitutes one of our “problems”, well, I for one am not complaining…



report abuse
 

Mike

posted October 4, 2010 at 9:18 pm


Those who wish to follow something else – the fake Christ they fabricated in their own image and likeness – are going Episcopal. And quite possibly somewhere else as well, might I add.
One of these days I’ll meet a conservative Catholic who isn’t as vicious and judgmental as you are. Maybe. In the meantime, I’ll stick with finding decency elsewhere, because it surely isn’t where you are.



report abuse
 

Moonshadow

posted October 4, 2010 at 9:33 pm


the vestry of the parish had voted unanimously … they have voted to leave TEC … The entire parish will reportedly vote on joining …
Don’t you love democracy?



report abuse
 

Jack

posted October 4, 2010 at 9:43 pm


The Catholic faith was always meant to be the universal church of Christ on earth. Many protests left to exercise their free will and try to start a new faith. The problem is that the Catholic Church follows the one true faith and as a result, all protestants will never feel full union with God feel His complete love. All should return to the Catholic Faith. The horrific sins of gay and pedafile priests are nothing more than sex crimes against children and they must feel the full impact of the law. The sins of these perverts have nothing to do with the authenticity of the Catholic Faith itself. All should be Catholic and feel complete union with God.



report abuse
 

gael

posted October 5, 2010 at 6:37 am


Mike
Jesus Christ says “I am the Way”. Christians know that He is the Way, and that there is no other. Rejecting other “ways” is not “vicious” or wrong…it is our faith!
Also, being judgmental is NOT wrong and NOT counter to Chritian faith. It is yet another device by those who seek to undermine Christians to call Judgment itself evil or wrong. Don’t fall prey to the clamoring. We are told — in No Uncertain Terms — to judge. Judge evil for what it is; name it, judge it, reject it. We are told to choose truth; hey, guess what? That involves judgment. We are given free wil so that we can make choices based on…you guessed it…Good Judgment!
We do NOT judge the person; we judge the sin. And yes, we are judgmental in that – as early and as often as we can be.
You have bought into the liberal laissez faire concept of false tolerance and inclusivity. If you tolerate all, and include all, how do you discern right from wrong? Or, do you?



report abuse
 

Katherine

posted October 5, 2010 at 11:22 am


I have been to Mount Calvary Episcopal Church in Baltimore. They hosted a ecumencial Taize Evensong service. Beforehand I spoke with one of their vestrywomen and she was quick to tell me how this parish celebrated their inclusivity.
If inclusivity is something to be worried about, this parish may be trouble.
They were once a whites only parish for the rich and powerful. They rejected that heritage and reached out to the neighborhood around them. Races formerly segregated or barred were welcome. They reached out to immigrants, street people, divorcees, prostitutes, and people who were “NOCD.”
This congregation is not your Daddy’s upper class Episcopal Church and it is not your hateful “Christian” Right political club pretending to be a church.



report abuse
 

Kiro

posted October 5, 2010 at 3:09 pm


Mike, to believe in right and wrong is to be judgmental.
There’s no way around it.
(How loving are you toward that which you believe to be wrong, or even evil?)
Christianity teaches that it is important to love the sinner but hate the sin.
What does secular humanism teach about how to behave toward those whose beliefs are in conflict with its core beleifs? Are there limits to “tolerance”?



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

This blog is no longer active
This blog is no longer being actively updated. Please feel free to browse the archives or: Read our most popular inspiration blog See our most popular inspirational video Take our most popular quiz

posted 10:42:40pm Dec. 12, 2010 | read full post »

One day more
A reminder: "The Deacon's Bench" is closed! Please enjoy the archives!

posted 11:26:20pm Dec. 11, 2010 | read full post »

Meet Montana's married priest
Earlier this week, I posted an item about Montana getting its first married priest. Now a local TV station has hopped on the bandwagon. Take a look, below.

posted 10:29:55pm Dec. 11, 2010 | read full post »

Big day in the Big Easy: 10 new deacons
Deacon Mike Talbot has the scoop: 10 men today were ordained as Permanent Deacons for the Archdiocese of New Orleans. This group of men was formally selected on the day the evacuation of New Orleans began as Hurricane Katrina approached. The immediate aftermath of the storm for this class would be

posted 6:55:42pm Dec. 11, 2010 | read full post »

Gaudete! And let's break out a carol or two...
"Gesu Bambino," anyone? This is one of my favorites, and nobody does it better than these gals: Kathleen Battle and Frederica von Staade. Enjoy.

posted 1:04:10pm Dec. 11, 2010 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.