The Deacon's Bench

The Deacon's Bench


A priest’s last mass

posted by jmcgee

Here’s something out of the ordinary: a priest who is choosing to step away from priesthood, and being remarkably candid about it:

fathertomfarley-9jpg-c3509daf7763d661_large.jpgThe Rev. Tom Farley looked at packed pews Sunday morning and made a promise.

“There is an elephant in the room,” Farley said as Mass began at St. Clare Catholic Church in Southwest Portland. “But we’ll talk about it later — after Communion. ”

He was referring to the letter he’d sent to the congregation last week, which detailed why these Sunday Masses would be his last as a priest.

“I leave because of a private longing in my heart and soul that I have ignored or suppressed to my detriment,” he wrote in the letter.

“I love priestly ministry but I cannot live this life of celibacy.”

Farley, ordained in 1979, is the latest priest to leave the Catholic Church in the United States, which is struggling with a severe clergy shortage and declining numbers. American men joining the priesthood has dropped by 60 percent since the 1960s to about 40,000 in 2009 . Celibacy, required since the 12th century by the Catholic Church in the West, is sited as a major reason for that decline. Critics says that many men reject the priesthood because they aren’t willing to live without the intimacy of a life partner or that it leads to sexual frustration and breaking of priestly vows.

The Archdiocese of Portland has about 150 priests, including retired ones, who serve 124 parishes and 24 missions, and about 400,000 Catholics. In the last decade, perhaps half a dozen in the Portland archdiocese have left the priesthood, often quietly, and some have married, also quietly. National numbers of priests who marry aren’t reported and tracked.

Farley’s decision and his letter pushed him into the spotlight.

In a telephone interview Saturday, Farley, who is in his mid- to late-50s, wouldn’t discuss leaving, except to say it was a “gut-wrenching” decision. Known for his professional openness, he agreed to be photographed during Sunday Mass and did not bar reporters from the church.

Parishioners packed Farley’s last Masses — one Saturday evening and three on Sunday morning. As part of the services, the congregations knelt with him to confess their sins and listened as he preached a brief sermon. After Communion, Farley carried a sheet of paper to the lectern and read:

“I want to say how honored I have been to be a fellow disciple with you in the Catholic Church. I am leaving without anger or resentment, not wanting to hurt you or the Church. I do not want to be a poster child for married priests.”

Farley, who graduated from high school in Corvallis, said he will live in Portland. He drew chuckles when he said he would be looking for a job, “like a real person.” He said he will remain a practicing Catholic. He can still receive the sacraments, but if he chooses to marry in the church, he must go through a process to be released from his vows.

Meanwhile, he said, “I look forward to parish shopping — like you have been able to do.”

He plans to be in the parish hall from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. April 7 for good-byes. As Farley finished, parishioners in at least two of the services stood and applauded for almost a minute. He did not linger after Mass as he often did to shake hands and chat.

The Rev. James Galluzzo will return as interim pastor at St. Clare. The archdiocese is expected to assign a new priest to St. Clare in July.

After Mass, parishioners said they were stunned by Farley’s letter. It sparked speculation about marriage in Farley’s future, but most were still focused on what the priest had brought to the parish, and the legacy he would leave.

“He was one of us,” said Frank Elliott, who was baptized as an adult by Farley. Farley also married Elliott and his wife, Kathleen, and baptized their two daughters.

“He was part of our family,” Kathleen Elliott said through her tears. “Always, in his sermons, he brought the message to life. He took his family stories and translated the Gospel in a meaningful way.”

Read on at the link.

And let’s remember to keep him and all priests in our prayers during this Year for Priests. 



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Holy Cannoli

posted March 22, 2010 at 7:34 am


Another man?



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Tom

posted March 22, 2010 at 7:41 am


Imagine coming home to your spouse, the kids seated around the table:
“Honey, I have an announcement. I love you so much, but I simply can’t remain faithful to you any more. I’ll write you and the kids on birthdays and holidays, and I look forward to registering on to those matchmaking sites the same as you!”
These two statements share the same degree of ludicrousness. Pray for this misguided soul. He’s still married to the Church (the mystical body of Christ) and what God joins together, let no man tear appart.



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Tommy

posted March 22, 2010 at 8:54 am


Celibate priests need the loving support of other priests. They also need the loving support of their congregation—expressed in appropriate ways. Unfortunately— both are in short supply in many parishes and dioceses. Unfortunately, with less and less priests. . . guys start looking for love, in all the wrong places. It is so easy to fall out of love for the priesthood. Priests are a good catch— to many a woman.
I am so sorry for Tom— and his parish!



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Bill

posted March 22, 2010 at 9:41 am


First, celibacy is not an absolute requirement inherent in the priesthood; that’s why we have so many married (former Protestant minister)priests here in the Latin church as well as our thousands of married Eastern Catholic priests. It is a matter of church DISCIPLINE, not doctrine or dogma.
Second, clerical celibacy is NOT on an equal footing as the sacrament of matrimony, so the example equating Tom’s situation with a husband leaving his family is not accurate. One is a sacrament, the other is not. Yes, it is certainly a tough time for Tom and the entire parish community, and it would be wonderful if it were not happening, but he is no more “married” the church through his celibacy than any other person (married or celibate) is joined to the church. Continuing the point made in the last paragraph: if celibacy equated to “marriage” to the church, then how does one explain the relationship of married Catholic priests and deacons to the church? Are they somehow “less” connected to the People of God? Of course not.
We should keep everyone involved in prayer, of course. At the same time, we should also appreciate the agony and the honesty of what Tom is going through. Having had several other friends who have gone through this journey, I can attest to their suffering and the courage and integrity this takes. Rather than keeping his struggle under wraps and allowing it to fester and cause additional psychic and ecclesial difficulty, Tom is being open and honest with himself and the people.
God bless,
Bill



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James

posted March 22, 2010 at 10:02 am


Honesty. Integrity. Transparency. Tom Farley represents all of these. It something our church needs more of from our leadership. Pray for our Church.



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EEZYLIFE

posted March 22, 2010 at 10:11 am


J.M.J.
@HOLY CANNOLI: I don’t understand your comment, when the priest has conducted himself properly, is respected and cared for in his parish community and has publically expressed that he wishes to remain a practicing catholic.
God Bless him and you.



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Eka

posted March 22, 2010 at 10:46 am


Bill,
The Sacrament of Marriage may not be compared with the discipline of celibacy, but it most certainly is on the same footing as Holy Orders. I am sure this was an excruciating decision for him, but in the same way that parents should think about the consequences on their children when they divorce, so should a priest think about the terrible damage to his flock when he chooses to leave.
We need to pray for all of them.



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plavo

posted March 22, 2010 at 10:48 am


Well, for the priest to be married is great; but why aren’t priests and bishops monogamous? why do they flit from one parish to another, or from one diocese to another?…..to move so quickly from one place to another could be compared to promiscuity….



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Dante

posted March 22, 2010 at 10:53 am


To Bill – Bravo! I need say nothing more.



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JIM

posted March 22, 2010 at 11:23 am


The apostle Paul said some interesthing things. ” But if they do not have self-control , let them get married. For it is better to marry than to burn with sexual desire .Do we not have the to the company of a believing wife ?
The CATHOLIC CHURCH & honesty ! Balderdash !! More like lies & deceit from the top to the bottom !!



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Klaire

posted March 22, 2010 at 11:39 am


Bill and Dante, it appears that you are both misguided on the understanding of consecrated holy celibacy. Indeed the Catholic Church allows married priests and married deacons, never married bishops, and NEVER AFTER THE VOWS ARE TAKEN. Once the consecration is made to Christ, it’s an “unbreakable marriage” so to speak.
Having been in one of the first Christoper West courses/classes of Theology of the Body, I was privileged to take it with many priests (and nuns), learning firsthand how difficult it is for many. I also came to realize, how when properly understood, with enough prayer, and God’s grace, how extraordinary beautiful holy celibacy actually is. Indeed it is its own vocation to which some are indeed called.
It’s easy to forget that Jesus was a celibate. For those to whom celibacy is a real vocation, living in God’s given grace, there is nothing more beautiful. In essence, consecrated celibacy properly lived, is not only the witness to heaven, but is a foretaste of heaven, (marriage and sex) only being a foretaste of the ultimate “marriage/union with Christ.” If this doesn’t sound like a big deal, for any who don’t realize it, the meaning of life is union with Christ, an ecstasy even our sex obsessed culture could never come close to achieving through the “physical only.”
In fact, the more we as a culture get away from consecrated celibacy, the more we lose mysticism, the more our culture becomes “sex obsessed.” In other words, our obsession of sex as a culture is a direct result of our “un” obsession with Christ. Consequently, if we did have the proper understanding and strong prayer life, more priests would have an easier time, as with more prayer comes more grace.
Nothing is ever a coincidence, be it the year of the Eucharist or the year of the priest. On this side of the veil, I doubt that many realize how just one Hail Mary for a priest matters.
While there is certainly nothing wrong or unholy about the married priests that we do have (obviously it wasn’t their vocation to also be celibate), as Catholics we should all live in great fear of the day we lose celibacy in the priesthood. If that day ever comes, we will have essentially have lost the greatest witness to heaven on earth.
The story of this priest is very sad, and probably could have been prevented with prayer (from us). Maybe it’s not too late.
Celibacy is not the problem; it’s the solution, albeit misunderstood by the modern world. Praying for priests (and all religious) is imperative.



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Wondering

posted March 22, 2010 at 1:01 pm


Jim if the Catholic Church is so dishonest why are you reading this blog?



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Dante

posted March 22, 2010 at 2:24 pm


Klaire: I believe the topic was on celibacy as a requirement to (western) priestly ordination; not allowing those who are ordained to marry (except laized clergy with the proper dispensation). Yes, Jesus was celibate. I am sure s primary reason was as you mention (total dedication to God’s work) but I also think Jesus, being God, knew that his theoretical marrying and begetting of children would wreak havoc in the Church. Can you imagine what attitude and position any blood-descendant of Christ might claim within the Church?
The magisterium of the Church, reiterated by Vatican II and quoted as such by Paul VI in his encyclical on priestly celibacy (SACERDOTALIS CAELIBATUS, June 24, 1967) teaches that celibacy: “is not, of course, required by the nature of the priesthood itself. This is clear from the practice of the early Church and the traditions of the Eastern Churches.” (#17). Paul VI goes on to give a beautiful treatment of the history and meaning of clerical celibacy and likewise wonderfully states that the married clergy of the Eastern Church also live a lifestyle brought about by the Holy Spirit. So the pope teaching on his own as pope in an encyclical and together with the bishops in general council all teach that the one, holy, catholic and apostolic faith sees both celibacy and marriage as valid Spirit-led lifestyles in which to live the one priesthood of Jesus Christ.
I think we should have this same attitude as Paul VI and the bishops if we wish to profess our faith with the mind and heart of the Church. Celibacy is a good thing, a holy thing, when embraced for the sake of the Kingdom as a sign of love. Marriage is a sacrament (which makes it a higher means of grace than celibacy in itself) and a beautiful sign of the marriage of Christ and his Church. There is no need to play one against the other. Both doctrine and practice develop over time and according to cultures (as Paul VI also states) without harm to the Faith and this can happen also with this topic at hand.



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Fr. Jim

posted March 22, 2010 at 3:35 pm


I applaud his honesty with his people, rather than attempting to live dual lives as others have. I do agree as well with other writers that priests today need the prayers and support of their people. I know personally I DEPEND on their prayers and am so blessed by their support.
The priesthood today does demand sacrifice. Priests are often maligned due to the moral failures and criminal behavior of others. In many ways, we have to work that much harder to earn the trust of our people. In presenting the disciplines and teachings of the gospel in fidelity to church teaching we are sometimes confronted with “Who is the Catholic Church to tell me how to live my life?” citing the Church’s poor response to the sex abuse scandals.
It seems to me that the message we need to hear today is one of reconciliation. It’s not easy being a priest or a Catholic Christian in today’s world.
Is celibacy the silver bullet solution to the problems facing the Church today? I doubt it. However, is there anything preventing the Church from honoring celibacy in religious life and among bishops (as well as diocesan priests) while being open to the possibility of ordaining married men? I don’t believe so. However, if we move in that direction it should be a response to the guidance of the Holy Spirit, not as a quick fix to a problem with numbers.



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Wondering

posted March 22, 2010 at 4:37 pm


Fr Jim nice to hear a priest’s take on the situation. Yes, in this Year for Priests how many have prayed for their priests or shown any appreciation for what they do?
It means much more to hear what you said than those who bloviate about something they know nothing about.



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pagansister

posted March 22, 2010 at 5:44 pm


Good for him…following his heart. Wish him the best as he leaves the “celibate” life and enters the real world.



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Holy Cannoli

posted March 23, 2010 at 8:13 am


@ EEZYLIFE
I have no sympathy for this weak sister who is a traitor to the faith, to his vows and another embarrassment to the Catholic Church and the moral authority it once (but no longer because of “men” like this) held. He and his supporters are examples of the mindset in post VC-II “progressives.”
Disgusting, yet typical of the modernism which has infiltrated the Church and many of its members. In a better time and place, he would have been burned at at the stake and there would have been unity “with one accord in Solomon’s porch.”



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Frank Hannon

posted March 23, 2010 at 9:41 am


“He’s been a good match. This is a liberal parish with clear ideas about social justice. He didn’t just put his stamp on us; he allowed us to put our stamp on him.”
“I look forward to parish shopping — like you have been able to do.”
These comments illustrate some profound confusion.
Oh, yes, of course that nasty Catholic orthodoxy knows NOTHING about social justice!
Did Father truly allow his flock to put its stamp on him? Unfortunately, that doesn’t necessarily comport with a priest who would truly fulfill his role acting in persona Christi.
Considering that the focus of Mass atttendance is supposed to be Jesus truly present on the alter, there’s an element of scandal in Father’s open endorsement of parish shopping.
If Father was, say, in his 30′s, rather than being well into his 50′s, a celibacy-driven decision would be a a tad easier to understand from a human perspective.
Finally, Father’s selfish advertisement of his decision was probably driven by a need for closure, but his flock is being victimized anyway, and it’s quite predictable that this publicity just serves as more fodder for the secular world to misunderstand and criticize the Church, while deeming him a martyr.



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Franklin Jennings

posted March 23, 2010 at 9:52 am


“Wish him the best as he leaves the “celibate” life and enters the real world.”
Who knew pagansister held marriage in such high regard that unmarried people are not even in the ‘real world’, as she defines it.
Astounding!!!



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Your Name

posted March 23, 2010 at 11:47 am


KLAIRE,
I understand.
Thank-you for your “spot-on” comments…especially your take on the loss of mysticism…again…spot-on
Peace to all



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pagansister

posted March 23, 2010 at 12:24 pm


FranklinJ: Marriage is great for some and not for others. Unmarried people are obviously in the real world also. The priest will be entering the world that is not regulated by his vows as a priest…celibacy being one of those. You chose to totally misinterpert my statement. Personally after 45 years of marriage, I find it a worthwhile institution…but not all do.
Also for those who are critical of this priest leaving…would it be better if he stayed and was totally unhappy? That would definately affect his work as a priest.



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Holy Cannoli

posted March 23, 2010 at 1:18 pm


>>>would it be better if he stayed and was totally unhappy?
There was a time when holy clerics and holy lay people knew, in their hearts, that their happiness depended on doing the Will of God.
This man’s leaving is no great loss. Whether the Catholic Church changes policy on married priests is not the issue here. This story deals with the acts of a dissenter and adeserter who, in a self-serving and face-saving spectacle, is simply trying to justify his cowardice by giving a ‘campaign speech’ for married priests. In so doing, he is negatively affecting his parish by giving mixed signals regarding what is and what is not acceptable behavior by a priest no less.
Rev. Tom Farley is no hero. He would have earned more respect (relative speaking) if he simply advised his superiors of his intentions and then quietly left through the back door keeping his big mouth shut.
>>> As Farley finished, parishioners in at least two of the services stood and applauded for almost a minute.
Poorly catechized dim-wits.



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Wondering

posted March 23, 2010 at 1:50 pm


pagansister wrote, “After 45 years of marriage, I find it a worthwhile institution”—I wonder if your husband does?



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cathyf

posted March 23, 2010 at 3:28 pm


I can’t help thinking that he sounds an awful lot like the fifty-something guy who decides to ditch his boring wife with the middle-aged body in order to take up with some hot young twenty-something airhead. (Although I suppose he won’t be able to afford the stereotypical red sports car.)
I honor all those who have had or are having mid-life crises who have chosen to honor rather than abandon their vows. Whether those vows were to marriage, ordination, and/or religious life.



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Wondering

posted March 23, 2010 at 3:49 pm


I wonder how many would stand up and applaud a man who announced he was leaving his wife?



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Your Name

posted March 24, 2010 at 8:40 am


I applaude Fr Fareley for making such difficult decision in his life…in reality over 50% of priests are in a , relationships, not because of the sexual activity, because it is human natural not to be alone to love and be loved. God created us not to alone to have companship and love…we must remember celibacy is a man made law..and partly due to greed and control. Fr Farley you are in my prayers to have a full christian and natural life just like the rest of us..Throughout history Popes, bishops, priests have had relationships even children..it is nothing new only modern day media puts it in the spotight and not under the carpet



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margaret

posted March 24, 2010 at 8:45 am


I agree



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pagansister

posted March 24, 2010 at 10:14 am


Wondering: yes he does too, or we wouldn’t still be married, huh?



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Dante

posted March 24, 2010 at 11:22 am


I think it would be most helpful to understand that the priest (or deacon or the religious even a nun) is NOT married to Christ through ordination or their religious vows in the same manner as we use this term in relation to the sacrament of matrimony. It is a diservice to all vocations to think of it this way.
This concept is a pious devotional viewpoint that is or can be a very helpful one to some or many priests to religious. But since Vatican II’s updating of obsolete customs and ideas, even the traditional phrase “bride or spouse of Christ” and dressing in a wedding gown for profession (which is no longer done in most congregations, even those who wear a habit) for nuns is long-standing but stems only from piety, not theology and not Scripture.
Now the idea of mystical spousal union has been used by pontiffs and can be found in the universal catechism in the section about consecrated virgins. But even here it is a mystical application as the text states and this puts it in the realm of spirituality not dogmatic theology. This does NOT insult or subtract from the awesome beauty and dignity of religious life…but we just need to “do the truth in charity” as Aquinas and B16 like to point out and be rooted in solid theology. As far as personal piety goes…if anyone finds this term helpful then go for it.
HOWEVER…
Basing ourselves in Scripture and in theology we must say that ALL Christians, ALL the baptized, are “married to Christ”. Jesus is the Bridegroom. The Church (us) is His bride. So we are spouses of Christ in this theological sense. What Scripture DOES tell us about celibate ministers/Christians is that they are more FREE to do the work of the Lord for the sake of the Kingdom. So actually, if or when ANY of us betray the Gospel, betray Christ by choosing serious sin then we ALL (not just a priest, a deacon or a religious by virtue of ordination or religious profession) have “left” our spouse.



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Wondering

posted March 24, 2010 at 11:35 am


Well pagan I have pity on him if he is that delusional.



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The Beaver Tail Whap

posted March 24, 2010 at 1:50 pm


I have known Tom for over 40 years… I knew that becoming a priest was his life’s dream in high school at CHS..
I also know that he and his brother were two of the greatest people I have ever met in my 56 years on this planet.
God’s speed, Tom…
We of the classes of 70-72 love you!!
And Cross Country and track would not have been as fun without your involvement..



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Romulus

posted March 24, 2010 at 4:36 pm


Amazing that so far no one has observed that Farley employs glass vessels in the celebration of Mass, in defiance of both tradition and explicit condemnation in an authoritative document. Farley’s just a man who does what he feels like doing. It’s no good casting him as a hero. He’s just sentimental, selfish, faithless, and self-absorbed. I pity any woman who winds up with him.



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Deacon Greg Kandra

posted March 24, 2010 at 4:48 pm


Romulus…
This article indicates that there is some flexibility in the United States for the use of sacred vessels. But the preferred material is, of course, precious metal.
On the other part of your post: unless you know him personally, you might want to refrain from personal attacks on his character. None of us is in possession of all the facts.
Dcn. G.



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Romulus

posted March 24, 2010 at 5:34 pm


Deacon Greg: The article at the link you provided specifically mentions the portion of the GIRM in which breakable materials are ruled unacceptable for sacred vessels. Moreover, in Redemtionis Sacramentum the use of glass is “reprobated”. That is a specific term indicating that a practice — in this case, using glass for a sacred vessel — can never be countenanced, period, no exceptions.
I do not know Farley personally. I know from the article that he plans to abandon his solemn vows. That is faithlessness. I know that he appropriates the Mass to showcase himself. That is self-absorption. I know that he appeals to the longings of his heart as justification. That is sentimentalism. And I know that he values his private satisfaction ahead of his vocation. That is selfishness.
I am sorry to speak with such asperity, but there it is.



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David

posted March 24, 2010 at 7:36 pm


Romulus: Boy, if you had been with Jesus and the woman caught in adultery (last week’s Gospel) you would probably have thrown a stone at her. An ancient “rule” does not define faith. Pray for him and all of us priests. David7



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St. Clare "Dim-Wit"

posted March 25, 2010 at 3:38 am


I am offended at the suggestion I am uneducated and/or stupid. The Catholic church has the challenge to reconcile the folks that are more concerned about the nature of Eucharistic vessels with those that are concerned about our spiritual life and treating priests as whole people.
St. Clare is a progressive parish with many service and social justice ministries, but we are reverant, respectful live the gospel. We have provded lots of appropriate support and friendship for our priests and Fr. Tom has had several very good priest friends. It just isn’t enough.
“Real world” means helping to tend for his aging parents, finding a job; getting health insurance, spending Easter with his family and yes — possibly in the furture a full relationship with a wife.
If he had slipped out the back door, I would have felt betrayed and abandoned. I appreciated knowing the reason he was leaving the priesthood and appreciated the opportunity to say thanks and goodbye.



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Wondering

posted March 25, 2010 at 7:47 am


Wondering exactly what a “progressive parish” is?



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Romulus

posted March 25, 2010 at 10:22 am


Boy, if you had been with Jesus and the woman caught in adultery (last week’s Gospel) you would probably have thrown a stone at her.
Quite possibly. I am fully sinful and stupid enough to have done so. Perhaps you give daily thanks that you’re not like this.



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St. Clare Dim-Wit

posted March 25, 2010 at 12:07 pm


Progressive simply means fewer bells, crystal Eucharistic vessels and socially active for justice (homeless, hungry, uninsured, unemplyed, etc.) Our liturgies are very similar to those I see when I travel and other parishes except the most conservative.



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Holy Cannoli

posted March 25, 2010 at 2:11 pm


I agree with Romulus since he is simply pointing out what our Church demands of its priests when celebrating the Eucharist. Regrettably, for some “free-thinkers” today nearly anything goes.
Regarding whether or not Romulus or I would have cast a stone at the adulterous woman, I seriously doubt it. The reason? Faithful Jews like us when have known that the Old Testament was explicit concerning the fact that both the woman and the man were to be executed (Deuteronomy 22:22).
This (speculation) is what the Lord was indicating when he wrote on the ground. So, where was the man? The accusing mob completely side-stepped this critical feature of God’s Law, demonstrating that this trumped-up situation obviously did not fit the Mosaic preconditions for invoking capital punishment. Obedience to the Law of Moses in this instance actually meant letting the woman go! It helps to know the Law both then and now.



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Holy Cannoli

posted March 25, 2010 at 2:27 pm


>>>Wondering exactly what a “progressive parish” is?
I’ll defer to the experts but I’m pretty sure that this would qualify. There’s probably a guitar in their somewhere out of camera. ;-)
http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f219/Sock91/D004_ClownMassA.jpg



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Wondering

posted March 25, 2010 at 3:52 pm


I am certain as others have pointed out that crystal, glass or anything breakable are not permitted for chalices. What would happen if the chalice broke?
As for the “social justice” jargon, as one priest put it–if you live the gospel you will be socially just.



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pagansister

posted March 25, 2010 at 3:56 pm


Wondering, you HAVE a problem…and I don’t have to wonder what it is.



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Wondering

posted March 25, 2010 at 6:27 pm


Coming from you Pagan I consider that a compliment. Perhaps your paganism makes you happy, but I find your comments here antagonistic, vapid and sappy. Still wondering what your interest is in a Roman Catholic blog? Isn’t there a pagan blog you could infect.



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pagansister

posted March 26, 2010 at 10:58 pm


W: I find all religions interesting and since this is an open site, I have just as much right to express my opinion as anyone else. Have a great day or night or whatever. BTW, no one requires you to comment on my comments. If you don’t like my “antagonistic, vapid and sappy” comments, then don’t respond.
Yes, there is a Pagan blog. You can comment on it …no one will mind.:o)



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Debbie

posted March 29, 2010 at 9:18 pm


Tom Farley made the charitable decision because he was not fit for the priesthood. I mean this with the best intention. I pray he discovers the fullness of the Catholic Church.



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LISTEN!

posted March 30, 2010 at 6:03 pm


Listen, most of you do not get this. Let him follow his dream. Like most of us on holidays, we go home to a family, or after a hard day of work we have a family, he doesnt. Dont tell him what he can or cant do. It must be a hard decision to make, but its his choice. But yourself in his shoes.



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KingJames

posted April 1, 2010 at 12:02 pm


I think many of you are judging this priest unfairly. Unless you have walked in his shoes you really don’t know what he has gone through. Gd created us to be in relationship with one another. That’s why he created them male and female. Do you know what it is like to be accused of something by a parishioner for something you did not do? or to be called to the seem where 3 teenaagers have just died and have to give comfort to their classmates and families? Then have to come home to an empty rectory and not have anyone to share your pain with? Many priests do have support groups and so forth to rely on. This only goes so far though.Celebacy was not maditory in the early church. The first Pope, St. Peter, was married. Some of our greatest priests, bishops and priests in the history of the church were married. Celebacy is the only thing this church has ever known but it was not always that way. I also know of a deacon who lost his wife, petitioned Rome was given the OK to remarry and still be active as a deacon. The thing is sometimes we treat outsiders in our church better than our priests. Why is it OK for a minister of another denomination who is married, to become a priest in our church when we won’t let our priests marry? I know many priests who are tired of the current hiarchy of the church and it’s try to hold on to power. Every since the abuse scandal the church has turned inward instead of outward. The new missal is just an example of this. If our bishops were truly concerned about church in this country, they would be trying to figure out why so many catholics today do not practice their faith. We have lost two generations of catholics in this country and I don’t see the bishops doing awhole lot about this. Also, many of the priests feel betrayed by the bishops. When all the sexual abuse scandal was at it’s heights, the bishops basically threw all the priests under the bus. They seemed to put all the blame on the priests while never making themselves accountable, especially when they knew about it and did nothing to stop it. I have yet to see one bishop resgin because he felt responsible for reassigning a priest who he knew was an abuser. The church has not been faithful to her priests and stood up for them. I would like to see some bishops take responsibility for their part in the abuse scandal. I wonder if the Pope is ever going to admit he is responsible for those priests who abused under his watch? He may not have know about them but he was in charge of those who did. He is responsible for this whether he wants to admit it or not.



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Pam

posted April 9, 2010 at 3:01 pm


As a practicing Catholic, I do feel that priests should be allowed to marry. Will we see it in my lifetime-probably not. As for the Pope – he also is human, and 20 or 25 years ago-he made a mistake. Lets move on-the important thing is that he is rectifying the mistake so no other child is possibly harmed.



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iizpruvqc

posted February 14, 2014 at 4:37 am


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