Beliefnet
Activist Faith

Back on March 15th, I posted a petition to help remove the delay of text donation funds to Japan’s earthquake and tsunami victims. Over 40,000 people had signed it within 24 hours. As of now, over 66,000 have joined the petition. PLUS, there is now good news to report.

Change.org, the group hosting the petition, shared the following report from the law student who began the petition, including input from US Senator Boxer who agreed:

Upon hearing the news, Masaya said, “I just heard that the major wireless carriers have decided to expedite donations they received to Japan. This is a great victory. Given that the earthquake and tsunami have not only physically ravaged but also financially devastated the affected areas, the immediate transfer of donations will be of enormous assistance.”

“I am very grateful to Senator Boxer, to the media who helped publicized this and, most importantly, to the sixty-six thousand  other individuals who signed the petition. As this is the second instance that mobile companies have expedited donations to humanitarian disasters, I am hopeful that this will become a default policy that mobile companies will eventually follow. Donations should reach victims of disaster as soon as possible. It is heart-warming that mobile companies are beginning to realize and support this idea.”

Senator Boxer said, “I am pleased that our nation’s four largest wireless providers will expedite mobile donations to Japanese relief efforts to help the victims of this terrible disaster. Now all those who send their donations by text can rest assured that their contributions are being rushed to assist those most in need.”

Thank YOU for being the change on this issue!

Read more at Change.org.

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DILLON BURROUGHS is an author, activist, and co-founder of Activist Faith. Dillon served in Haiti following the epic 2010 earthquake and has investigated modern slavery in the US and internationally. His books include Undefending Christianity, Not in My Town (with Charles J. Powell), and Thirst No More (October). Discover more at ActivistFaith.org.

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