The Call of Sedona: Journey of the Heart

The Native Americans called Sedona “the land where Mother Earth’s energy, which gives eternal life, comes out.” Furthermore, they believed that “great souls” inhabit the red rocks, and that they make the people who come and find Sedona awaken to their true dreams and yearnings.

Excerpted from The Call of Sedona : Journey of the Heart, by Ilchi Lee. Copyright © 2011 by Ilchi Lee. Excerpted with permission by Scribner, a Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Chapter 1


In early 1996, 1 was reading a newspaper in Los Angeles when I saw a photo that immediately grabbed my attention. “Hey, where is this place?” I asked. The red rocks were so real they felt like they might jump out of the paper at me. I read the caption beneath the photo and learned it was a place called Sedona, in the state of Arizona.

I couldn’t get there fast enough; I wanted to see those red rocks, so I asked an acquaintance to come with me. It was a long drive of nearly eight hours. We cruised along from Los Angeles to Flagstaff until we came to Sedona. It was the middle of the night, so we settled into a motel that hugged Oak Creek Canyon.

It was a dark night, so there was little chance to see the scenery aside from the sparkling stars that filled the night sky with their refreshing twinkling. I wondered what Sedona would look like when I opened my eyes in the morning. As I filled my lungs with its clean, crisp air, I went to sleep with excitement and anticipation in my heart.

As soon as I opened my eyes the next morning, I threw back the curtains. The view was of a mountain of blended red and white rocks, standing tall above the verdant juniper trees. At the top of the mountain were large and small rocks shaped like various animals. Then I saw one that caught my attention. At a flat part on the top, there was a modest rock whose form resembled a person meditating while seated in the lotus position.

I thought to myself, “Wow, even the rocks in Sedona meditate!”



I couldn’t tell whether that was true or if those were the only rocks my eyes could see, no matter where I looked, but my initial feeling was very good.

After a simple breakfast, I wandered about Sedona, here and there, wherever I felt like going. It seemed like the entire city was embraced by arms of red rock. The green of the junipers and cacti that dotted the red turf proffered a dramatic contrast of color. The sky of Sedona, wrapped around the red burnt earth, seemed clearer and bluer than any sky I’d seen. There was a sanctity circulating in the air between earth and heaven. Though it was winter, warm sunlight was shining down through the clear air. As I looked at the dazzling beauty of Sedona’s earth and sky awash with the morning sun, my heart skipped a beat, and it occurred to me that this just might be the place for which I had been searching for so long.

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