2016-07-27
The following is a library of statistics involving the intersection of religion, politics, and values on the American scene. RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS
Confidence in Public Institutions

The military 64%
The church or organized religion 56
The police 54
The U.S. Supreme Court 47
Banks 46
The medical system 40
The presidency 42
Public Schools 37
Newspapers 37
TV News 36
Source: The Gallup Organization, July 10, 2000

Religious Influence in Public Life
Q: Would you rather see religious and spiritual values have greater influence in politics and public life than they do now, less influence, or about the same influence as they do now?
Greater      38%
Less        22%
Same         38%
No opinion  2%
Source: Survey by The Washington Post/Kaiser Family Foundation/Harvard University, July 29-August 18, 1998, in May/June 2000 issue of Public Perspectives

Influence of Judeo-Christian Beliefs
Q: We're interested in finding out why you think America has been successful during this past century. [Do you think]...Judeo-Christian beliefs...is a major reason, or not a reason for America's success?
Major reason  41%
Minor reason  28%
Not a reason  20%
Don't know    11%
Source: Survey by Princeton Survey Research Associates for the Pew Research Center, April 6-May 6, 1999, in May/June 2000 issue of Public Perspectives

CANDIDATES' FAITH

A Candidate's Faith--Public or Private?
Q: Do you think candidates for president should publicly discuss their religious beliefs or keep their religious beliefs to themselves?
Discuss             45%
Keep to themselves  47%
No opinion          7%
Source: Survey by ABC News January 19-23, 2000, in May/June 2000 issue of Public Perspectives

Relationship with Jesus--A Factor in Voting Choices?
Q: As you may know, some candidates for president this year have talked about their personal relationship with Jesus Christ during debates and news interviews. When a candidate for office does this, does it generally make you more likely or less likely to support that person for president?
More likely                                 51%
Less likely                                 26%
Depends on the candidate/statement (vol.)  7%
No opinion                                  16%
Source: Survey by the Gallup Organization for CNN/USA Today, December 20-21, 1999, in May/June 2000 issue of Public Perspectives

Shared Religious Belief--A Factor in Voting Choices?
Q: Which of the following is more important to you in deciding how to vote for president--a candidate's personal commitment to his religious beliefs, or a candidate who shares your religious beliefs?
A candidate's personal commitment to his
religious beliefs                              49%
A candidate who shares your religious beliefs  17%
Neither (vol.)                                  28%
Not sure                                       6%
Source: Survey by NBC News/Wall Street Journal, March 2-5, 2000, in May/June 2000 issue of Public Perspectives

Religion and Policy Decisions by Politicians
Q: Which is closer to your point of view? Some people say our elected officials should be guided by their religious values when making policy decisions. Other people say it would be bad if our elected officials were guided by their religious values when making policy decisions because religion and politics shouldn't mix.
Should be guided by religious principle  42%
Religion and politics don't mix          46%
Both equally/none (vol.)                 6%
Unsure                                  6%
Note: Asked of registered likely voters
Source: Survey by the Tarrance Group & Lake, Snell, Perry, & Associates, January 3-5, 2000, in May/June 2000 issue of Public Perspectives

EVANGELICALS/RELIGIOUS RIGHT
Political Profile of Born-Again Christians

Overall, 85% of the born again individuals are registered, compared to 75% among non-born again adults. Among born again adults who are registered, the same percentage are associated with the Democratic Party as with the Republican Party (35%). A minority of born again voters consider themselves to be conservative (43%). However, born again voters are seven times more likely to consider themselves to be conservative than to be liberal.

Among the born again constituency, not quite one-fifth are evangelicals. Of the 57 million born again Christians who are likely to vote, 12 million are evangelicals. The evangelicals are more likely to be registered to vote, to call themselves conservative, and to be likely to vote. Evangelicals prefer Governor Bush to Vice President Gore by a 4 to 1 ratio (68% to 17%). The number of born again voters will be double the total number of black and Hispanic voters combined.

One out of every eight born again voters (13%) will be Catholic. Protestants and Catholics take different paths on the election. Catholics are evenly split between Mr. Bush (43%) and Mr. Gore (42%). Protestants prefer Mr. Bush by a 46% to 34% count.
Source: Barna Research Online, Feb. 17, 2000

Attitudes Toward the Religious Right
Q: Next, I have a question about the conservative Christian political movement sometimes known as the "religious right." Do you generally support the political views of the religious right, do you oppose their views, or do you neither support nor oppose them?

                          Support    Oppose    Neither    Don't know enough

2000 Mar 17-19       26%    23    43    8
2000 Mar 10-12       26%    23    45    6
1996 Feb 23-25        20%    27    --    53

Q: Next, I have a question about the conservative Christian political movement sometimes known as the "religious right." Do you think of yourself as part of the religious right, or not?

                           Support    Oppose    Don't know enough
2000 Mar 17-19       24%    67    9
Source: The Gallup Organization

Biblical Literalists Have Greater Regard for Authority
Q: In general, would you say that people shoudl obey the law without exception, or are there exceptional occasions on which people should follow their consciences even if it means breaking the law?

           Those responding the Bible is:
           Actual Word of    Inspired Word,    Ancient book of
           God to be taken    but not    fables, legends, history
           literally word    everything to be    and moral precepts
           for word    for word    taken literally    recorded by men
Obey law      61%    37%    29%
Follow
conscience      39%    63%    71%

Q: [Do you agree or disagree] It is wonderful that young people today have greater freedom to protest against things they don't like and to 'do their own thing?'

           Those responding the Bible is:
           Actual Word of    Inspired Word,    Ancient book of
           God to be taken    but not    fables, legends, history
           literally word    everything to be    and moral precepts
           for word    for word    taken literally    recorded by men
Agree      56%    69%    83%
Disagree      44%    31%    17%
Source: Surveys by the National Opinion Research Center-General Social Survey, combined data sets 1972-98 in May/June 2000 issue of Public Perspective

RELIGIOUS GROUPS BY THE ISSUES

Religious Groups and Church/State Issues
Churches should:
a) Stay out of politics
b) Stand up for values
Government should:
c) Separate church/state
d) Protect religious heritage

White Protestant:
Evangelical:
Traditional a) 16% b) 81% c) 25% d) 70%
Nontraditional a) 39 b) 57 c) 39 d) 55

Mainline:
Traditional a) 43 b) 53 c) 48 d) 48
Nontraditional a) 59 b) 39 c) 56 d) 40

White Catholic:
Traditional a) 36 b) 62 c) 40 d) 59
Nontraditional a) 58 b) 40 c) 56 d) 40

Hispanic Catholic: a) 51 b) 49 c) 43 d) 54
Black Protestant a) 28 b) 69 c) 36 d) 57

Jews a) 73 b) 24 c) 84 d) 11
Secular a) 63 b) 34 c) 66 d) 30

ALL a) 45 b) 52 c) 47 d) 48
Source: 1998 National Survey of Americans on Values, cited by John C. Green in Mark Silk report "Religion and American Politics"

Religious Groups, School Vouchers, and School Prayer
a) Pro vouchers
b) Pro school prayer
c) Children allowed to pray
d) Specific Christian prayer

White Protestant:
Evangelical:
Traditional a) 54% b) 89% c) 60% d) 13%
Nontraditional a) 58 b) 84 c) 60 d) 11

Mainline:
Traditional a) 40 b) 73 c) 64 d) 6
Nontraditional a) 32 b) 67 c) 64 d) 5

White Catholic:

Traditional a) 68 b) 85 c) 50 d) 12
Nontraditional a) 55 b) 64 c) 58 d) 4

Hispanic Catholic: a) 65 b) 69 c) 46 d) 18
Black Protestant a) 52 b) 84 c) 51 d) 23

Jews a) 22 b) 22 c) 33 d) 0
Secular a) 41 b) 46 c) 52 d) 3

ALL a) 49 b) 71 c) 56 d) 9
Source: 1998 National Survey of Americans on Values, cited by John C. Green in Mark Silk report "Religion and American Politics"

Religious Groups, Sexual Issues, and Women's Rights
Unacceptable:
a) Premarital sex*
b) Extramarital sex*
Abortion:
c) Limit**
d) Ban*
e) Women equal with men*

White Protestant:
Evangelical:
Traditional a) 74% b) 87% c) 73% d) 25% e) 63%
Nontraditional a) 54 b) 81 c) 42 d) 11 e) 79

Mainline:
Traditional a) 54 b) 75 c) 42 d) 4 e) 68
Nontraditional a) 28 b) 65 c) 19 d) 2 e) 82

White Catholic:
Traditional a) 50 b) 77 c) 53 d) 20 e) 71
Nontraditional a) 26 b) 66 c) 39 d) 9 e) 88

Hispanic Catholic: a) 41 b) 69 c) 51 d) 12 e) 85
Black Protestant a) 50 b) 69 c) 41 d) 16 e) 79

Jews a) 14 b) 47 c) 10 d) 0 e) 93
Secular a) 29 b) 62 c) 23 d) 6 e) 85

ALL a) 43 b) 72 c) 41 d) 12 e) 78
Source: *1998 National Survey of Americans on Values, **National Elections Study 1996, cited by John C. Green in Mark Silk report "Religion and American Politics"

Religious Groups, Homosexuality, and Gay Rights

Unacceptable:
a) Gay sex
b) Gay marriage
Homosexuality Illegal:
c) Public
d) Private
e) Protect gays from job discrimination

White Protestant:
Evangelical:
Traditional a) 74% b) 84% c) 64% d) 26% e) 74%
Nontraditional a) 64 b) 74 c) 36 d) 16 e) 82

Mainline:
Traditional a) 45 b) 56 c) 36 d) 12 e) 90
Nontraditional a) 48 b) 56 c) 36 d) 12 e) 88

White Catholic:
Traditional a) 58 b) 65 c) 31 d) 12 e) 91
Nontraditional a) 38 b) 45 c) 20 d) 6 e) 93

Hispanic Catholic: a) 44 b) 48 c) 23 d) 10 e) 95
Black Protestant a) 63 b) 74 c) 49 d) 31 e) 85

Jews a) 22 b) 24 c) 16 d) 11 e) 90
Secular a) 42 b) 44 c) 20 d) 8 e) 94

ALL a) 53 b) 61 c) 34 d) 14 e) 87
Source: 1998 National Survey of Americans on Values, cited by John C. Green in Mark Silk report "Religion and American Politics"

Religious Groups and Economic Issues
Government should:
a) Equalize income--No*
b) Reduce poverty--Yes*
c) Fewer public services, lower taxes**
d) Improve standard of living*

White Protestant:
Evangelical:
Traditional a) 73% b) 64% c) 55% d) 45%
Nontraditional a) 69 b) 71 c) 34 d) 49

Mainline:
Traditional a) 81 b) 67 c) 54 d) 49
Nontraditional a) 66 b) 71 c) 42 d) 52

White Catholic:
Traditional a) 67 b) 72 c) 42 d) 54
Nontraditional a) 69 b) 74 c) 37 d) 54

Hispanic Catholic: a) 59 b) 78 c) 20 d) 65
Black Protestant a) 49 b) 75 c) 16 d) 70

Jews a) 71 b) 63 c) 14 d) 58
Secular a) 70 b) 71 c) 40 d) 41

ALL a) 67 b) 71 c) 39 d) 51
Source: *1998 National Survey of Americans on Values, **National Elections Study 1996, cited by John C. Green in Mark Silk report "Religion and American Politics"

Religious Groups and Impeachment
a) Clinton should be impeached
b) Scandal a public matter
c) Clinton not "moral"
d) Approve of Clinton's job as president

White Protestant:
Evangelical:
Traditional a) 55% b) 54% c) 72% d) 54%
Nontraditional a) 36 b) 34 c) 57 d) 66

Mainline:
Traditional a) 35 b) 37 c) 65 d) 74
Nontraditional a) 19 b) 26 c) 52 d) 71

White Catholic:
Traditional a) 34 b) 38 c) 62 d) 77
Nontraditional a) 31 b) 31 c) 52 d) 73

Hispanic Catholic: a) 23 b) 19 c) 26 d) 92
Black Protestant a) 6 b) 12 c) 18 d) 97

Jews a) 20 b) 35 c) 46 d) 97
Secular a) 22 b) 27 c) 42 d) 77

ALL a) 30 b) 32 c) 50 d) 74
Source: National Election Study, 1998, cited by John C. Green in Mark Silk report "Religion and American Politics"

Religious Groups and Attitudes Toward Morality
a) U.S. on "wrong track on morals"*
b) Agree (newer lifestyles break down society**)
c) Disagree (adjust morals to changing times**)
d) Agree (tolerate different moral standards*)

White Protestant:
Evangelical:
Traditional a) 89% b) 91% c) 66% d) 55%
Nontraditional a) 84 b) 61 c) 54 d) 68

Mainline:
Traditional a) 76 b) 73 c) 79 d) 71
Nontraditional a) 67 b) 65 c) 44 d) 75

White Catholic:
Traditional a) 81 b) 76 c) 55 d) 64
Nontraditional a) 71 b) 74 c) 40 d) 76

Hispanic Catholic: a) 76 b) 54 c) 37 d) 71
Black Protestant a) 74 b) 68 c) 39 d) 71

Jews a) 66 b) 45 c) 25 d) 85
Secular a) 71 b) 49 c) 34 d) 78

ALL a) 71 b) 70 c) 51 d) 70
Source: *1998 National Survey of Americans on Values, **National Elections Study 1996, cited by John C. Green in Mark Silk report "Religion and American Politics"

VOTING BEHAVIOR
Religion, Partisanship, and Ideology

Partisanship*:
a) Republican
b) Democrat
Ideology**:
c) Conservative
d) Liberal

White Protestant:
Evangelical:
Traditional a) 60% b) 30% c) 70% d) 10%
Nontraditional a) 41 b) 49 c) 45 d) 25

Mainline:
Traditional a) 57 b) 35 c) 68 d) 16
Nontraditional a) 53 b) 38 c) 51 d) 25

White Catholic:
Traditional a) 44 b) 43 c) 58 d) 19
Nontraditional a) 40 b) 50 c) 45 d) 31

Hispanic Catholic: a) 19 b) 70 c) 34 d) 38
Black Protestant a) 8 b) 84 c) 36 d) 35

Jews a) 15 b) 79 c) 20 d) 69
Secular a) 34 b) 50 c) 37 d) 41

ALL a) 40 b) 49 c) 48 d) 28
Notes: *Independents are not reported, **Moderates are not reported. All entries are means for 1994, 1996, and 1998.
Source: National Elections Study 1994, 1996, and 1998, cited by John C. Green in Mark Silk report "Religion and American Politics"

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