I’d imagine people in your profession and other dangerous professions would be in constant fear for your life and for your family.  Is that something that you have to deal with?

Dog:  We deal with concern, not fear.  Fear comes not from the Father. That’s in the Bible. Fear is not from God. God doesn’t have a closet full of fear and [says], "Let’s send a little fear down to Dog."  He has caution and faith and all that. But fear does creep in.  Since it’s not from God, it must be from somewhere else. And when fear gets in the car, we stop and let it out. Anybody in a job that is kind of on the dark side, so to speak, has to let fear out. 

 

You can’t be afraid to put out a fire if you’re a fireman.  You can’t be afraid to be a police officer and carry a gun if you’re afraid to get up and go out there.  So you’ve got to put that fear to the side and go out in faith to overcome that.

 

Has your caution or concern increased since your arrest in

Mexico?

 

Dog:  The only thing I would be afraid about is if 20 guys jump me and knock me out and swim me across the Hawaiian waters to

Mexico.  But no, the fear hasn’t grown.

Sometimes bad things happen to people who do good deeds.  How do you explain that?

Dog:  You’re always going to be challenged, and you’re always going to have things that you come up against. You never know what life brings.  I know my life will be a win.  And when they bury me they will say, "Dog lived a great life. And you know what?  In the end, he won."  That's all that counts, what you do in the end.  You’re going to have some ups and downs and some sunshine and some rain.

That's life.  If you live life perfectly, it would be a bore. If you lived it negatively, you’d be homeless.  I live in the median of that.

 

When you were in jail in