In a controversial move (controversial among many religious conservatives), the Boy Scouts of America recently reversed their longstanding policy banning “open and avowed homosexuals” from becoming Scouts. In other words, the BSA now affirms that it’s okay for Boy Scouts to be gay.

However, it’s still not okay for Boy Scouts to be atheist; that particular longstanding policy is still intact. One discriminatory BSA ban is coming to an end; another remains in full force.

Rather than launching into a lengthy (and wordy) overview and analysis of this whole issue, I will instead simply pose the question to readers: is this fair?

As a private organization, the BSA is perhaps within their legal rights to refuse admission to whomever they choose. But is it right? Should the Scouts continue to bar boy atheists (and even boy agnostics, too) from membership in their ranks?

Thoughtful, polite, and well-reasoned reader comments are invited.

 

 

 

 

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