At sunset yesterday (February 23, 2013), Jews worldwide began observing one of Judaism’s most joyous and celebratory annual holidays (or “holy days”): Purim, or the Feast of Lots. Purim runs throughout the following day (today), before concluding at nightfall this evening (February 24).

I’ve written a special article all about Purim, featured elsewhere on Beliefnet (click here to read it), so repeating that material here would be redundant. However, I couldn’t let this day go by without at least acknowledging today’s Jewish holiday here on my Religion 101 blog (or without including a link to my feature article on Purim, which I encourage everyone to read).

I also can’t let today’s blog entry go by without wishing my Jewish friends and readers around the globe Chag Purim Sameach (Hebrew for “Happy Purim Holiday”) and Freilichin Purim (Yiddish for “Festive Purim”)!

 

 

More from Beliefnet and our partners
previous posts

Specifically Christian newcomers to the study of Judaism frequently puzzle over  why — as they themselves often put it — Jews “don’t believe in Jesus.” The reality is simply that the entire Jewish concept of who and what a Messiah actually is (or does) is just nothing like what Christians themselves have in mind, when […]

Aside from the several other frequent areas of confusion which sometimes puzzle newcomers to the study of Judaism (areas which I’ve been discussing in my last several blog entries), there is yet another hazy area that is often uniquely puzzling to specifically Christian newcomers: why, as they themselves often put it, don’t Jews “believe in […]

As discussed in previous blog entries, a fairly sizable percentage of the American public seems to know surprisingly little about many of the basics of Judaism. In my own world religions courses, some students begin the semester with no real knowledge of the Jewish faith, and may even harbor some fairly common misunderstandings about it. […]

As discussed in previous blog entries, a fairly sizable percentage of the American public seems to know surprisingly little about the basics of Judaism. In my own world religions courses, some students begin the semester with no real knowledge of the Jewish faith, and may even harbor some fairly common misunderstandings about it. Many students […]