It’s TED Tuesday!

We tend to think of play as something kids do and as frivolous for adults in our work-ethic driven culture. But as Stuart Brown demonstrates in this TED talk, play is anything but frivolous and not just for kids. Since animals play, play is part of our genetic inheritance and serves important developmental biological functions. It’s too bad that as a culture we don’t nurture play into adulthood. I view play as integral to exquisite self-care and something that we should do often and with others. Play often provides a spontaneous form of mindfulness. We naturally fall into mindfulness when we are engaged in play. Having fun holds great power to move us into the present moment. So have some fun today!

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