More objections from adherents of Biblical literalist creationism to my recent posts on the subject have been coming in. Some are thoughtful and raise subtle distinctions. As a Facebook friend writes:  I just wanted to register the fact, without rancor, that I am a “naive Biblical literalist” myself. As a matter of fact, it sort of sounds…

I got some emails from self-described Biblical literalist creationists objecting to my calling such literalism “naive.” I’ve been pondering whether there’s a better word for it but so far I’m stumped. I guess you could characterize creationism simply as “Biblical literalism” applied to the Genesis creation account and leave out the disparaging adjective “naive.” Certainly…

This Shabbat, starting here in Seattle at 6:02 p.m. tonight, we begin again the yearly cycle of Torah readings, starting with Genesis 1. With that in mind, I was thinking about this teasing retort from a reader, Sondra, responding to my post on men and angels: Oh Dear David, why must Jews be such intellectual…

Why did Adam choose to call himself “Adam”? Rabbi David Lapin has a fascinating new essay on this week’s Torah portion, Bereishit (Genesis 1:1-6:8), that deals with the question. You’ll recall from Genesis 2:19 that God brought all the animals before the first man and asked him what their names should be. Adam derived each name…

David Klinghoffer
about

David Klinghoffer

David Klinghoffer is an author and senior fellow in the Religious, Liberty & Public Life program at the Discovery Institute. His writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the National Review, the Weekly Standard, and the Jewish Forward. A California native, he currently lives on Mercer Island, Washington, with his wife and five children.

read full bio
More from Beliefnet and our partners
More from Beliefnet and our partners