Yesterday fellow saint and sinner Tammy shared this meditation on the meaning of Good Friday; but its use of J.R.R. Tolkien’s term, “eucatastrophe,” also makes it an Easter sermon for anyone anywhere who has sat, metaphorically speaking, outside a tomb of one kind or another, waiting for something better to happen.

The musical feature for the week is “Fix You,” by another of my favorite boy bands, Coldplay, performed in a piano duet at the Good Friday service I had the privilege of being a part of. The song had me sobbing. Easter, after all, is about a God who “tries to fix you” when you’ve tried to do the fixing and failed, over and over again: “lights will guide you home and ignite your bones and I will try to fix you,” God says.

Happy Easter! Or, as they say in Russia before downing a shot of vodka, “Christos voskris!” “Christ is risen!”

 

 

 

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