Fellow saints and sinners, none of you pointed this out (rather surprisingly), but it occurred to me this morning that I had originally written this: “The Bible and my Reformed tradition have taught me that we human beings are capable of making idols out of just about anything, children included- maybe most especially our children…”

I’m not sure what I was thinking when I wrote it- I probably wasn’t thinking!- but that last clause, “maybe most especially our children,” is now gone.

Actually, if I had to choose one cardinal idol that deserves a “most especially” before it in Scripture, it would be money and greed, mainly because of the hard things Jesus has to say about wealth.

But, this, too, like many things here at this intersection between life and God, is up for discussion. If it’s true that “the Bible teaches…we human beings are capable of making idols out of just about anything,” (in other words, we are incredibly creative when it comes to giving ourselves over to death-inducing things in place of the one, living God) is there one form of idolatry that Scripture tends to highlight over others- in the sense that we human beings are “most especially” prone to it?

What do you think?  I’m all ears.

 

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