This week, I heard something quite disturbing come from the Muslim world. At the Organization of the Islamic Conference summit, Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad had this to say: "The Europeans killed 6 million Jews out of 12 million, but today the Jews rule the world by proxy. They get others to fight and die for them." In addition, Mohamad claimed that Jews "invented socialism, communism, human rights and democracy" to avoid persecution and gain control of the most powerful countries.

Prime Minister Mohamad's comments have made me think long and hard about the origin of such anti-Jewish sentiments in the minds of some Muslims. Many say they originate in the Qur'an. In fact, some Muslims (and non-Muslims) have gone so far as to say the Qur'an "curses" the Jews. I strongly differ. Although the conflict in the Holy Land has placed a burdensome strain on Jewish-Muslim relations--one which I lament deeply--it should never cause any Muslim to put words into God's mouth.

The Qur'an is an amazingly sophisticated document, and this sophistication is evident in how the Qur'an treats Jews. The Jewish tribes of Medina instantly rejected the Prophet's message almost as soon as he arrived in the city. One would think, then, that the Qur'an would be awash with verses attacking Jews and their faith. This is simply not true.

Some verses in the Qur'an call on Jews and Christians to believe in the message of Muhammad (2:41, 5:19). Other verses recount many parts of Jewish sacred history (2:40-85, 3:33-60). Still other verses praise the Torah of Moses (3:3), the Gospel of Jesus (5:46), and a good number of the Hebrew Prophets (3:84, 6:84-87). Many of these Prophets--such as Moses and Jesus--are mentioned by name in the Qur'an many more times than Muhammad himself. An entire chapter (12:1-104), in fact, is devoted to the story of Joseph and his brothers. Moreoever, one verse challenges the Jews and Christians to follow their own scriptures appropriately: "Say [O Muhammad]: 'O People of the Book! ye have no ground to stand upon unless ye stand fast by the Law, the Gospel, and all the revelation that has come to you from your Lord'..." (5:68). There is absolutely no statement in the Qur'an that issues a blanket condemnation of all Jews or Christians. None. So when someone tells me otherwise, I simply scratch my head in confusion.

Now, if one wants to misquote, mistranslate, or quote verses of the Qur'an out of context, he will find ample "evidence" to support the fallacious claim that the Qur'an is anti-Jewish. But anyone with sinister intentions can quote a verse of scripture out of context to seemingly prove a point.

For instance, in Numbers 31:14-27 it says, "And Moses was angry with the officers of the army, the commanders of thousands and the commanders of hundreds, who had come from service in the war. Moses said to them, 'Have you let all the women live? Behold, these caused the people of Israel, by the counsel of Balaam, to act treacherously against the Lord in the matter of Pe'or, and so the plague came among the congregation of the Lord. Now therefore, kill every male among the little ones, and kill every woman who has known man by lying with him."

Is it fair to call Moses a "terrorist" who killed innocent people? Is it fair to characterize all of Judaism as "evil" based upon a Biblical verse taken out of context? Absolutely not. Islam and the Qur'an should be accorded this same treatment. The Qur'an is many things to many people, but one thing it is not is a book that attacks Jews and their faith. It does not take a scholar to know this to be true.

Not only has the conflict in the Holy Land caused some Muslims to put words in God's mouth, it has led others to do some truly silly things. According to the Middle East Media Research Institute, Nabil Hilmy, an Egyptian professor of international law and human rights, announced in the weekly Al Ahram that he and an Egyptian legal team are planning to sue the "Jews of the world" over gold allegedly stolen just before the famous Exodus out of Egyptian bondage.

When I read of the lawsuit, I almost laughed out loud. Hilmy, however, was not joking. He is reportedly seeking to collect trillions of dollars from "the Jews of the world" and the "Jews of Israel in particular." Perhaps as a goodwill gesture, he has offered to reschedule the debt over 1,000 years with "the addition of cumulative interest during that period."

When asked by the Jewish weekly The Forward to comment on the case, Harvard Law School professor Alan Dershowitz replied, "I'd be happy to defend the Jews." So would I, and I am not even a lawyer--nor Jewish. A Muslim defender of the Jews of Egyptian descent? Absolutely.

Do not be surprised--for Moses, you see, figures prominently in Muslim belief. He is one of the five mightiest Messengers of God, along with Noah, Abraham, Jesus and Muhammad. The Qur'an says that God bestowed His grace upon Moses and Aaron (37:114), that he was "specially chosen" by God (19:51) and that God bestowed on Moses "wisdom and knowledge" (28:14) as a reward for doing good. At least 73 Qur'anic passages - many of them encompassing several verses at a time - talk of Moses.

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