Beliefnet
“Test all things. Hold on to what is good.”

For two thousand years, this wisdom from the Apostle Paul (found in 1 Thessalonians 5:21, HCSB) has been a reliable guide for helping parents and kids navigate the moral currents of everyday life.

Still, Paul never dreamed of costumed superheroes and the rise of comic book culture. And he probably didn’t guess your kids would be obsessed with muscular men and buxom women wearing bright-colored tights. So what’s a modern American parent to do?

“Test all things. Hold on to what is good.”

Paul’s words are still true and still valuable today. In the 21st century, though, parents must sometimes dig a little deeper to discover “what is good” for our families to hold onto; to find out why kids love comics, and what parents should know about comic book culture.

Fortunately, Papercutz Graphic Novels creators Stefan Petrucha (writer) and Michael Petranek (editor) are willing to help. That’s why, at Denver Comic Con, FamilyFans met with these two veteran comics pros to get a little behind-the-scenes insight for modern moms and dads…

Stefan Petrucha and Mike Petranek. Wow, it’s an honor. Thanks for taking time with us. Help us get to know you a little bit to start: How did you discover comic books?

Stefan
It was how my grandfather taught me how to read! It was an issue of Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen…It was Jimmy’s birthday and the League of Super Heroes gave him a ring and their costumes that gave him their powers temporarily. I didn’t know who any of these people were, but I was totally fascinated. Gripped. And it went on from there.

Michael
I was introduced to comics through the 1980s Justice League TV show, the cartoon. After that I was like, “OK, well, where’d this come from?” and I went to the comics. Then, through going to comic stores, I got into the X-Men and Spider-Man after that in the late 80s and early 90s. That cartoon show really got me into it, though.

Stefan, you’ve written very popular comics like Power Rangers, Rio, Nancy Drew, Mickey Mouse, and the X-Files. Michael, you’ve edited many of the same. What should parents know about the work you do, and the way you do that work?

Michael
I have to work well with others, let’s say that! Especially as an editor, I really have to work well with others. I started out making copies at Papercutz, and I’m an editor now. I would say that there’s a lot more that goes into it than it might seem. I went to school for theatre, as a director, and creating a comic can be a lot like that from my standpoint. Like putting together a whole production.

Stefan
The thing I would tell parents is that we’re conscious of our audience. Papercutz is for all ages, but it’s mainly for tweens and up, and we’re very careful with the licenses. Nancy Drew comics aren’t going to be written like Game of Thrones. But within that context we do exciting stories that teach valuable lessons, and at the same time present interesting characters in a fun way. So there’s that reassurance. And Michael seems to want to say something else...

Michael
I do, I do! I also want to say that we really respect the kid who reads our stories. We don’t want to talk down to the kid, but we want to make sure that almost anybody could pick up our graphic novels and be engaged.

Why do kids love comics?

Stefan
Because they’re very discerning! (Laughs)

People think you’re somehow not reading when you’re looking at a comic book, but you are. It’s a part of the brain that deals with visual and spatial information, and when you’re growing up, when you’re a kid, we pay attention to both of those things. So there’s an appeal and there’s a lot of power in the media that they, and a lot of adults now, tend to recognize.

Michael
It’s almost ironic because, really, reading a comic takes more parts of your brain. And kids are imaginative. I wish I was still as imaginative as I was when I was four years old. Kids are more open. I never get a question about—I think Grant Morrison said this—about ‘Who puts the air in the Batmobile tires?’ from a kid. The kid accepts it.

A Comic Con attracts all ages: parents, preschoolers, teens and preteens, even grandparents. What makes Comic book culture so appealing to people?

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