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The Queen of My Self

This week’s theme is the Winter Solstice and all the multicultural goddesses and festivals associated with the return of the light.

The Mayan Indians of Guatemala perform a flying pole dance, palo voladare, in honor of the old, indigenous pre-Columbian sun god. Two dancers climb a fifty-foot pole to the energetic beat of a flute and drum. At the top, they each wrap one end of an attached rope around one of their feet and leap off into the wild blue yonder. If they manage to land on their feet, the sun god will be pleased enough to start sending more light to Earth each day.

Soyal is the Winter Solstice observance of the Hopi Indians of the American Southwest. During this sacred season of solar renewal, the kachinas, the guides, the spirit helpers of the tribe, emerge from their dark kivas. They come up from the underground ceremonial spaces to join the community for the six-month period of ascending light. Fires are lit and the original creation tale is retold, re-enacted and reclaimed. This ritual participation in the process of the universe affirms and assures the continuation of the cyclical order of time. At Soyal, the sun is symbolically, ceremonially, turned back, thus renewing life for all the world.

The return of the retreating sun, which retrieves us from the dark of night, the pitch of winter, is a microcosmic recreation of the origination of the universe, the first birth of the sun. The winter solstice is an anniversary celebration of creation. It is both natural and necessary to join together in the warmth of community to welcome the return of light to a world in the dark and to rekindle the spirit of hope in our heart.

Lighting a light at the darkest time of the year is a pledge somehow. A promise. A sacred vow. Such a small, symbolic gesture. So elegantly simple. So significant. Each tentative flicker of each flame is a reminder of the fragility and pulsating persistence of the life force. Each spark, a signal flare of faith.

    
One by one, in tiny increments,
candle by candle, gesture by effort,
wish by prayer, concern by care,
we feed the life-fires of the soul
and light the infinite universe,
little by little from within.
– Donna Henes
 
***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

Festivals of Light – Part 3

This week’s theme is the Winter Solstice and all the multicultural goddesses and festivals associated with the return of the light.

The Mayan Indians of Guatemala perform a flying pole dance, palo voladare, in honor of the old, indigenous pre-Columbian sun god. Two dancers climb a fifty-foot pole to the energetic beat of a flute and drum. At the top, they each wrap one end of an attached rope around one of their feet and leap off into the wild blue yonder. If they manage to land on their feet, the sun god will be pleased enough to start sending more light to Earth each day.

Soyal is the Winter Solstice observance of the Hopi Indians of the American Southwest. During this sacred season of solar renewal, the kachinas, the guides, the spirit helpers of the tribe, emerge from their dark kivas. They come up from the underground ceremonial spaces to join the community for the six-month period of ascending light. Fires are lit and the original creation tale is retold, re-enacted and reclaimed. This ritual participation in the process of the universe affirms and assures the continuation of the cyclical order of time. At Soyal, the sun is symbolically, ceremonially, turned back, thus renewing life for all the world.

The return of the retreating sun, which retrieves us from the dark of night, the pitch of winter, is a microcosmic recreation of the origination of the universe, the first birth of the sun. The winter solstice is an anniversary celebration of creation. It is both natural and necessary to join together in the warmth of community to welcome the return of light to a world in the dark and to rekindle the spirit of hope in our heart.

Lighting a light at the darkest time of the year is a pledge somehow. A promise. A sacred vow. Such a small, symbolic gesture. So elegantly simple. So significant. Each tentative flicker of each flame is a reminder of the fragility and pulsating persistence of the life force. Each spark, a signal flare of faith.

    
One by one, in tiny increments,
candle by candle, gesture by effort,
wish by prayer, concern by care,
we feed the life-fires of the soul
and light the infinite universe,
little by little from within.

– Donna Henes
 
    

***
The Queen welcomes questions concerning all issues of interest to women in their mature years. Send your inquiries to thequeenofmyself@aol.com.

CONSULT THE MIDLIFE MIDWIFE™
Queen Mama Donna offers upbeat, practical and ceremonial guidance for individual women and groups who want to enjoy the fruits of an enriching, influential, purposeful, passionate, and powerful maturity.

 

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