Project Conversion

Project Conversion


Becoming Brother Bowen

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Every relationship thrives on trust. Within Christianity in general and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in particular, this trust, honesty, and integrity is not only paramount for a true relationship with Jesus Christ via repentance of sins, but also to the Church community as well.

Therefore, if I am to have a meaningful relationship with my new Latter-day Saints family and become a brother among them, I must confess something…

Once upon a time, I was an enemy of the Latter-day Saints.

As a judgemental Christian in high school, I regularly sought out and debated with LDS members of my community. I chased them down if I saw them riding their bikes in my community. I invoked scripture I believed supported my stance against them. The Mormons were heretics who follow a false prophet; only the pit of hell was good enough for their souls. In fact, anyone who thought differently than I did received this treatment.

All the while, I was sleeping with my girlfriend at the time and had a child out-of-wedlock.

Granted, I am not the vile, ignorant, hypocritical, and intolerant young man from the past, however the very presence of this past creates a unique situation for this month: emotional baggage.

I’ve asked Heavenly Father for forgiveness, however before we go any further, am asking for yours–for the forgiveness of the members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I am here to understand you more, with a clear heart and mind, to represent and be part of your beliefs and culture for these 31 days the best that I can. Will you forgive me? Will you accept me as your brother? Will you trust me to bear your name?

If you forgive me (and I trust that you have), thank you from the bottom of my heart. If not, I understand and hope you would give me the chance to earn your trust.

Now to get this thing started!

My Mentor this month is Elder Christensen, a young man and missionary from Utah, who currently serves a two-year mission teaching about Jesus and His restored Church in eastern North Carolina. He is accompanied by another newer missionary to the area, Elder Brown. “Elder” is a title bestowed upon these young men once they take up the call to serve through missions work for two years.

After a 2 1/2 hour meeting yesterday, my Mentors provided guidelines to follow throughout my month with their Church.

First of all, I am now Brother Bowen and Project Conversion is a “ward”, a size-based congregational unit within the Church structure.

Elder Christensen emphasized three aspects of LDS life I must follow:

  1. Direct prayer to Heavenly Father (God)
  2. Study of the Book of Mormon and other Scripture
  3. Leading an exemplary life based on the qualities of Jesus Christ

Elder Brown told me that he prays every morning after waking, before studying Scripture, eating, and any other activity that requires guidance. But it’s not just about asking for things, Elder Christensen said, it’s a “two-way conversation between yourself and your literal Father in heaven.”

So, I began this morning with prayer:

 Dear Heavenly Father, I ask for guidance and inspiration through the Holy Spirit this month as I spend time with Your restored Church. Help me understand the principles and truths brought down to us through the Book of Mormon and your living prophets. I ask that you bless and guide my Mentors as they take time out of their busy schedule to teach me in the ways of this Church. These things I pray in the name of Your Son, Jesus Christ, amen.

Next, I study the Scriptures. These include:

The Book of Mormon, the keystone Scripture of the faith.

A triple set which includes Doctrine and Covenants, The Pearl of Great Price, and the Book of Mormon

 

The King James Bible

In addition to the Scriptures, I also have study aides:

The pamphlets cover many aspects of the church, including "The Restoration of the Gospel", "Chastity", "Tithing and Fast Offering", "The Plan of Salvation", and "The Gospel of Jesus Christ"

I will also study from a text called “Gospel Principles” which serves as an introductory guide to new members of the Church.

Gospel Principles

The first week of every month seems like a hectic crash course. This month is particularly difficult because I just spent the last month without a spiritual rudder to guide me. What’s so intriguing for me for July with the LDS Church is that it’s the first time since I left Christianity 10 years ago that I will interact with Jesus and the God He described in heaven. I know a lot of mainstream Christians don’t believe LDS members are Christians but I can’t shake the feeling that I’m somehow taking a trip back to my old spiritual homestead. There is a lot of work to do in order to tend this abandoned garden of faith, but with a little sweat, guidance from my Mentors, and the help of our Ward, I know we can make this month a great success.

If you are a mainstream Christian (or anything else for that matter), I invite you to visit an LDS church service at least once this month. Don’t be who I was in high school. Don’t judge the book, before or after you’ve opened the cover. If you are a member of the LDS church, I invite you to join me in my quest of understanding. Our Facebook group, now an honorary ward, is a great place to teach as well as learn about everything that happens at Project Conversion.



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Anonymous

posted July 21, 2011 at 9:46 am


Thank you so much! I’m happy to be here with you.



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Anonymous

posted July 21, 2011 at 9:46 am


Thank you so much! I’m happy to be here with you.



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Mommyg

posted July 21, 2011 at 6:22 am


Wow. I just checked you out due to a friend’s FB page & I’ve got tears in my eyes. Welcome to my faith this month. Glad to have you.



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Mommyg

posted July 21, 2011 at 6:22 am


Wow. I just checked you out due to a friend’s FB page & I’ve got tears in my eyes. Welcome to my faith this month. Glad to have you.



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:32 am


You are so right, Mandy. Reading these stories in our Scriptures about characters with all-too human traits is like seeing ourselves in a mirror. And when we see these people come out the other side in triumph–even if bruised–we can then see ourselves in the same light, and the possibility of a brighter future comes into greater focus. Thank you for bringing this story to us!



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2011 at 10:32 am


You are so right, Mandy. Reading these stories in our Scriptures about characters with all-too human traits is like seeing ourselves in a mirror. And when we see these people come out the other side in triumph–even if bruised–we can then see ourselves in the same light, and the possibility of a brighter future comes into greater focus. Thank you for bringing this story to us!



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:14 pm


Perfect : )



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:14 pm


Perfect : )



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:13 pm


Thanks!



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 6:13 pm


Thanks!



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EmiG

posted July 2, 2011 at 5:52 pm


Doc & Cov 58:42 “Behold, he who has repented of his sins, the same is forgiven and I, the Lord, remember them no more.”

Jeremiah 31:34 “And they shall teach no more every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for they shall all know me, from the least of them unto the greatest of them, saith the Lord: for I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.”

I’m sure there are others, but those are the two coming to mind right now… :)



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EmiG

posted July 2, 2011 at 5:52 pm


Doc & Cov 58:42 “Behold, he who has repented of his sins, the same is forgiven and I, the Lord, remember them no more.”

Jeremiah 31:34 “And they shall teach no more every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for they shall all know me, from the least of them unto the greatest of them, saith the Lord: for I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.”

I’m sure there are others, but those are the two coming to mind right now… :)



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:30 am


Thanks for understanding, Sister Adams. Our past (and current struggles) can certainly hold us down, but progress is certainly worth struggling over.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:30 am


Hooray!



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:30 am


Thanks for understanding, Sister Adams. Our past (and current struggles) can certainly hold us down, but progress is certainly worth struggling over.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:28 am


A long way indeed! You’re right, and second hand information is like second hand smoke, and it’s still harmful.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:28 am


A long way indeed! You’re right, and second hand information is like second hand smoke, and it’s still harmful.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:25 am


True, sometimes this exploration can be uncomfortable. But the results are well worth it.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:25 am


True, sometimes this exploration can be uncomfortable. But the results are well worth it.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:24 am


I’ll be sure to check out that documentary. One of the LDS websites (I can’t remember which one right now) also has a short film about Joseph Smith as he struggled with faith. Very well done.

And there’s never a bad time to pick up the knowledge and experience of another teaching. Indeed, we can find what is sacred anywhere!



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:20 am


Thanks for this info, Brother David! Raleigh isn’t too bad a drive from here. I might just have to make a road trip ; )



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:20 am


Thanks for this info, Brother David! Raleigh isn’t too bad a drive from here. I might just have to make a road trip ; )



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:19 am


I think you hit the nail on the head, as usual. It’s a case of being too close for comfort or being the middle child. Mainstream Christians are uncomfortable (many, not all) with the LDS because they aren’t sure what to do with them. My solution? Say hi.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:19 am


I think you hit the nail on the head, as usual. It’s a case of being too close for comfort or being the middle child. Mainstream Christians are uncomfortable (many, not all) with the LDS because they aren’t sure what to do with them. My solution? Say hi.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:17 am


I am honored that you would join me here, Sister Heather. Hopefully you will find a few gems along the way!



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:17 am


I am honored that you would join me here, Sister Heather. Hopefully you will find a few gems along the way!



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:16 am


Hey there Sister Hartley! Oh I’m all about Buddha-quoting Mormons ; )

I agree that past sin (or any event) while it tends to condition us, in reality, is not us. I cannot remember the verse, but in the Book of Mormon as well as the Bible, it is said that when we whole-heartedly repent of our sins that Heavenly Father forgets the events themselves. I think the Buddha (and anyone) would agree that that’s a swell idea.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:16 am


Hey there Sister Hartley! Oh I’m all about Buddha-quoting Mormons ; )

I agree that past sin (or any event) while it tends to condition us, in reality, is not us. I cannot remember the verse, but in the Book of Mormon as well as the Bible, it is said that when we whole-heartedly repent of our sins that Heavenly Father forgets the events themselves. I think the Buddha (and anyone) would agree that that’s a swell idea.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:13 am


I will certainly do my best!



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:13 am


I will certainly do my best!



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:12 am


Thank you Niki. In all faiths I explore, all the devotees ask of me is to listen and give them a fair chance. Thanks for joining me in that.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2011 at 10:12 am


Thank you Niki. In all faiths I explore, all the devotees ask of me is to listen and give them a fair chance. Thanks for joining me in that.



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Heather

posted July 1, 2011 at 5:43 pm


I am overjoyed to have found your blog and to feel your genuine interest in learning about religions and finding truth.  I feel the same way, that there is so much good and so much truth to be found in the world. It seems wrong to discount any one religion without first looking into it to see what good can be found there.

I am a life-long member of the LDS church and I’m looking forward to exploring your blog to learn about other religions just as much as I am interested in following your look into my religion.  



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Heather

posted July 1, 2011 at 5:43 pm


I am overjoyed to have found your blog and to feel your genuine interest in learning about religions and finding truth.  I feel the same way, that there is so much good and so much truth to be found in the world. It seems wrong to discount any one religion without first looking into it to see what good can be found there.

I am a life-long member of the LDS church and I’m looking forward to exploring your blog to learn about other religions just as much as I am interested in following your look into my religion.  



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Meredith Hartley

posted July 1, 2011 at 5:17 pm


(long time lurker here)

I read an interview with the Dalai Lama and Paul Ekman, discussing forgiveness. In it, His Holiness emphasized that we have to let go of our past sins. They are actions, they are past, and while they shape us – they are not ourselves. When we ask for forgiveness or forgive another, we acknowledge that the past action and the current person are no longer the same. We are greater than the sum of our past. (Hi there! I’m a Buddha-quoting Mormon. Nice to meet you!).We’re all in luck, because it would seem that Christianity agrees. Peter argued with Christ *constantly* (to say nothing of denying him), and Paul held the coats as Stephen died.  One of the great Book of Mormon prophets, Alma the Younger (you’ll get to him), spent his youth “going about to destroy the church of God.”  Christianity, done right, has a long history of baggage.  

Thank you for trusting us all and sharing this with us.

Side note: If there isn’t an Institute class near you, you might join an early-morning seminary group. LDS high school students attend an hour of early-morning scripture study class each morning before school. If there are LDS high-schoolers in your area, there’s bound to be one nearby.



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Meredith Hartley

posted July 1, 2011 at 5:17 pm


(long time lurker here)

I read an interview with the Dalai Lama and Paul Ekman, discussing forgiveness. In it, His Holiness emphasized that we have to let go of our past sins. They are actions, they are past, and while they shape us – they are not ourselves. When we ask for forgiveness or forgive another, we acknowledge that the past action and the current person are no longer the same. We are greater than the sum of our past. (Hi there! I’m a Buddha-quoting Mormon. Nice to meet you!).We’re all in luck, because it would seem that Christianity agrees. Peter argued with Christ *constantly* (to say nothing of denying him), and Paul held the coats as Stephen died.  One of the great Book of Mormon prophets, Alma the Younger (you’ll get to him), spent his youth “going about to destroy the church of God.”  Christianity, done right, has a long history of baggage.  

Thank you for trusting us all and sharing this with us.

Side note: If there isn’t an Institute class near you, you might join an early-morning seminary group. LDS high school students attend an hour of early-morning scripture study class each morning before school. If there are LDS high-schoolers in your area, there’s bound to be one nearby.



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EmiG

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:34 pm


And this is why I love this site and this project.  I completely trust that the faith that is so precious to me will be approached with the same respect and integrity that other religious traditions have been treated.  Thanks, Andrew!



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EmiG

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:34 pm


And this is why I love this site and this project.  I completely trust that the faith that is so precious to me will be approached with the same respect and integrity that other religious traditions have been treated.  Thanks, Andrew!



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Niki Whiting

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:33 pm


I’ve mentioned to you some of my own issues with Mormonism. I’ve read the Book of Mormon, Pearl of Great Price and the D&C. It’s been a long time though and I was a younger person then. I still have such reservations about the Mormon faith, but I look forward to vicariously exploring through you. I still maintain that Mormons are among the nicest, most helpful and friendly people as you can ever hope to meet.



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Niki Whiting

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:33 pm


I’ve mentioned to you some of my own issues with Mormonism. I’ve read the Book of Mormon, Pearl of Great Price and the D&C. It’s been a long time though and I was a younger person then. I still have such reservations about the Mormon faith, but I look forward to vicariously exploring through you. I still maintain that Mormons are among the nicest, most helpful and friendly people as you can ever hope to meet.



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:12 pm


Thanks Lea. I understand how difficult it can be to set aside old feelings. I have faith that I’ll be able to do this during the month, but that doesn’t imply it will be easy. Of course, few good things are : )



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:12 pm


Thanks Lea. I understand how difficult it can be to set aside old feelings. I have faith that I’ll be able to do this during the month, but that doesn’t imply it will be easy. Of course, few good things are : )



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:10 pm


My pleasure! I certainly will ask about these classes. Thanks!



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:10 pm


My pleasure! I certainly will ask about these classes. Thanks!



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:09 pm


I brought up that point yesterday when I saw my Mentors pray in the same fashion. It isn’t a had, fast rule to pray with this posture, but it is very common within the LDS community. My purpose is to adopt as much as I can, to become as closely associated with each group as possible. My Mentors pointed out that I can pray in whatever way I feel comfortable.



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:09 pm


I brought up that point yesterday when I saw my Mentors pray in the same fashion. It isn’t a had, fast rule to pray with this posture, but it is very common within the LDS community. My purpose is to adopt as much as I can, to become as closely associated with each group as possible. My Mentors pointed out that I can pray in whatever way I feel comfortable.



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:05 pm


Looking forward to some patriotic sing-along!



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 3:05 pm


Looking forward to some patriotic sing-along!



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J. Lea Lopez

posted July 1, 2011 at 2:45 pm


I had the privilege of speaking with some LDS missionaries a few times in college, and met some other people from the faith while visiting a friend in Arizona. Across the board, they were some of the nicest people I’ve ever met. But I also have some baggage surrounding the faith (nothing quite as serious as yours lol) so I think this is a great opportunity to set that aside and really learn what the faith can teach me. Looking forward to what you have to share with us this month!I had the privilege of speaking with some LDS missionaries a few times in college, and met some other people from the faith while visiting a friend in Arizona. Across the board, they were some of the nicest people I’ve ever met. But I also have some baggage surrounding the faith (nothing quite as serious as yours lol) so I think this is a great opportunity to set that aside and really learn what the faith can teach me. Looking forward to what you have to share with us this month!



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J. Lea Lopez

posted July 1, 2011 at 2:45 pm


I had the privilege of speaking with some LDS missionaries a few times in college, and met some other people from the faith while visiting a friend in Arizona. Across the board, they were some of the nicest people I’ve ever met. But I also have some baggage surrounding the faith (nothing quite as serious as yours lol) so I think this is a great opportunity to set that aside and really learn what the faith can teach me. Looking forward to what you have to share with us this month!I had the privilege of speaking with some LDS missionaries a few times in college, and met some other people from the faith while visiting a friend in Arizona. Across the board, they were some of the nicest people I’ve ever met. But I also have some baggage surrounding the faith (nothing quite as serious as yours lol) so I think this is a great opportunity to set that aside and really learn what the faith can teach me. Looking forward to what you have to share with us this month!



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AustinSFaux

posted July 1, 2011 at 2:28 pm


Hi Andrew,

Thanks for giving my faith a try.  I converted to the Church about 5 years ago, after being an atheist for 25 years.  I highly recommend going to Institute, ask the elders where it is held.  Institute is a weekly college level class on Religion that the Church runs.  A large amount of time the class is LDS oriented, but sometimes you can find some interesting classes.  A couple semesters ago we had a comparative religion class, and we had people of other faiths come and speak with us.  In Denver a Hebrew class is about to start, but I’m currently in a scripture study class.  

Thanks,
Austin-



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AustinSFaux

posted July 1, 2011 at 2:28 pm


Hi Andrew,

Thanks for giving my faith a try.  I converted to the Church about 5 years ago, after being an atheist for 25 years.  I highly recommend going to Institute, ask the elders where it is held.  Institute is a weekly college level class on Religion that the Church runs.  A large amount of time the class is LDS oriented, but sometimes you can find some interesting classes.  A couple semesters ago we had a comparative religion class, and we had people of other faiths come and speak with us.  In Denver a Hebrew class is about to start, but I’m currently in a scripture study class.  

Thanks,
Austin-



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Pagolesher

posted July 1, 2011 at 2:22 pm


(no need to post this as a comment, edit as you wish if you chose to post)

In the picture, your arms are crossed during your morning prayer. Might want to think about what this body language means…. especially in light of the very submissive prayer posture in the first image of your blog. 
This Jesus-God is the same spirit/source/power you have been with for the past 6 months. It is just wearing a different color shirt, and maybe glasses (ala Clark Kent/Superman)… same source of water, just a different well & a new bucket.

:-)



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Pagolesher

posted July 1, 2011 at 2:22 pm


(no need to post this as a comment, edit as you wish if you chose to post)

In the picture, your arms are crossed during your morning prayer. Might want to think about what this body language means…. especially in light of the very submissive prayer posture in the first image of your blog. 
This Jesus-God is the same spirit/source/power you have been with for the past 6 months. It is just wearing a different color shirt, and maybe glasses (ala Clark Kent/Superman)… same source of water, just a different well & a new bucket.

:-)



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Lorihinsdale

posted July 1, 2011 at 2:07 pm


You came at the right time! July is my favorite time to be Mormon because we get to sing the patriotic songs in the back of the hymn book during Sacrament meeting!! Boo-yah! (My name is Lori- I’m a friend of Laura..but not Fluffy, I don’t trust Fluffy!)



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Lorihinsdale

posted July 1, 2011 at 2:07 pm


You came at the right time! July is my favorite time to be Mormon because we get to sing the patriotic songs in the back of the hymn book during Sacrament meeting!! Boo-yah! (My name is Lori- I’m a friend of Laura..but not Fluffy, I don’t trust Fluffy!)



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 1:37 pm


Dan oh Dan, I’m not asking you to suspend disbelief. You know as well as I do that truth inhabits all things. The LDS church is the only faith on the schedule which produces jokes and cynicism from those whom I tell about the project. I simply refuse to be part of the crowd anymore. At the end of the day, we are all searching for truth. If we start teasing and splitting hairs over minute issues such as “holy underwear” then we are missing the whole point, being divisive, and relinquishing the chance to discover truth and brotherhood in the first place.



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 1:37 pm


Dan oh Dan, I’m not asking you to suspend disbelief. You know as well as I do that truth inhabits all things. The LDS church is the only faith on the schedule which produces jokes and cynicism from those whom I tell about the project. I simply refuse to be part of the crowd anymore. At the end of the day, we are all searching for truth. If we start teasing and splitting hairs over minute issues such as “holy underwear” then we are missing the whole point, being divisive, and relinquishing the chance to discover truth and brotherhood in the first place.



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 1:32 pm


I’m happy to have eased your involvement with this journey. And no, I cannot possibly become frustrated with these young men. My main teacher, Elder Christensen, has shown himself to be a very patient, caring, articulate, and intellegent young man. He has answered all of my questions to the best of his ability and promised to look more deeply into those of which he isn’t sure of. I feel that he takes my project at least as seriously as I do, and in that I feel secure in his Mentor status.



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 1:32 pm


I’m happy to have eased your involvement with this journey. And no, I cannot possibly become frustrated with these young men. My main teacher, Elder Christensen, has shown himself to be a very patient, caring, articulate, and intellegent young man. He has answered all of my questions to the best of his ability and promised to look more deeply into those of which he isn’t sure of. I feel that he takes my project at least as seriously as I do, and in that I feel secure in his Mentor status.



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 1:28 pm


The reaction of the Elders thus far lends credit to what you say. I certainly hope they see me as a blessing because they certainly are to me.

I understand your reservations with speaking about faith–especially one which recieves so much bad press and slander. The honesty was, I thought, a much needed purge of my own guilt. As I said, this is one of maybe two faiths of which I have personal baggage and part of this experience is to let go of such taints in our outlook. Thank you for joining me in this quest. I look forward to your insights.



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2011 at 1:28 pm


The reaction of the Elders thus far lends credit to what you say. I certainly hope they see me as a blessing because they certainly are to me.

I understand your reservations with speaking about faith–especially one which recieves so much bad press and slander. The honesty was, I thought, a much needed purge of my own guilt. As I said, this is one of maybe two faiths of which I have personal baggage and part of this experience is to let go of such taints in our outlook. Thank you for joining me in this quest. I look forward to your insights.



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Fluffytheturtle

posted July 1, 2011 at 11:37 am


The fact that you trust us enough to be that open and candid with us about your previous time with Mormons makes it easier for me to trust you to represent this often mis-understood religion with sincerity. I hope that the missionaries are able to answer your questions to your satisfaction (if you ever get frustrated with them, bear in mind that they are young boys, who most likely have not studied religion as hard as you have over the last few years). And I hope you find this experience better than your previous experiences with this religion.



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Fluffytheturtle

posted July 1, 2011 at 11:37 am


The fact that you trust us enough to be that open and candid with us about your previous time with Mormons makes it easier for me to trust you to represent this often mis-understood religion with sincerity. I hope that the missionaries are able to answer your questions to your satisfaction (if you ever get frustrated with them, bear in mind that they are young boys, who most likely have not studied religion as hard as you have over the last few years). And I hope you find this experience better than your previous experiences with this religion.



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Liz

posted July 1, 2011 at 11:28 am


Just so you know, those missionaries are going to be fascinated with you and your project. They’ll probably write home about you and tell their parents, girlfriends, and future children and grandchildren all about you. They will tell the story of meeting you and interacting with you for years to come.

On a different note, one of the the aspects of talking about religion that has always been sensitive to me (and has made talking about my own religion difficult for me at times) has been that I get truly nervous about sharing something that is very sacred, personal and special to me with someone who may use it to mock or ridicule me, or call me a heretic, or assume that I am something that I am not. I am really grateful for projects like yours that invite continued open-mindedness and will help move us towards a lot more open dialogue about faith. Thank you for being honest with yourself and with the “ward” about your past experience with the members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I hope that your previous experiences will make this month an even more valuable time of growth, learning, and understanding (and I think it will). Keep up the great work!



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Liz

posted July 1, 2011 at 11:28 am


Just so you know, those missionaries are going to be fascinated with you and your project. They’ll probably write home about you and tell their parents, girlfriends, and future children and grandchildren all about you. They will tell the story of meeting you and interacting with you for years to come.

On a different note, one of the the aspects of talking about religion that has always been sensitive to me (and has made talking about my own religion difficult for me at times) has been that I get truly nervous about sharing something that is very sacred, personal and special to me with someone who may use it to mock or ridicule me, or call me a heretic, or assume that I am something that I am not. I am really grateful for projects like yours that invite continued open-mindedness and will help move us towards a lot more open dialogue about faith. Thank you for being honest with yourself and with the “ward” about your past experience with the members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I hope that your previous experiences will make this month an even more valuable time of growth, learning, and understanding (and I think it will). Keep up the great work!



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Another Blog To Enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Project Conversion. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here are some other blogs you may also enjoy: Religion 101 Happy Reading!

posted 2:34:58pm Aug. 02, 2012 | read full post »

Is God an Immersionist?
In the world of faith, folks often point out the obvious fact that God does not belong to a particular creed, religion, race, or school of philosophy. This sentiment establishes the divine as one which transcends divisive terms of affiliation. But I am here to announce that a brief exploration of

posted 7:00:59am Jul. 12, 2012 | read full post »

Immersion in Relationships: Five Ways to Bring your Relationships to Life
I did something last night with my wife that we haven't done in a very long time... Okay, not from that far back, but it certainly feels that way. Last night, we had a date night. N

posted 10:58:33am Jul. 10, 2012 | read full post »

The Path of Immersion: An Introduction and How Entering the Path Leads to a Deeper Sense of Self
Today marks my official declaration of fidelity and discipleship to the Path of Immersion. Along with that declaration, I also invite you to join me in whatever capacity feels the most suitable. The Path of Immersion is not one which demands conversion, evangelism, worship, or exclusivity. Along th

posted 6:00:19am Jul. 09, 2012 | read full post »

Farewell, Project Conversion: The End of an Adventure
When I converted to Christianity at the age of 15, I assumed the faith with a passionate resolve. Despite the positive instruction from my pastor and others, I (for reasons I cannot explain) transformed into a fiery evangelist, launching Christianity at friends and strangers like salvos of religious

posted 12:49:25pm Jul. 05, 2012 | read full post »




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