Parenting on Purpose

Parenting on Purpose


Encouraging Our Kids To Ask For Help

posted by srballantine

I have noticed lately that many adults around me don’t know how, or feel embarrassed about asking for help. It’s my belief that these adults didn’t suddenly unlearn how to ask for help, they were probably never taught as kids.

 

Think about how important it is to ask for help. We can’t possibly know how to achieve or create everything we want completely on our own. Also, asking for help builds community, which is so important for our sense of wellbeing. Asking for help benefits those asking and those receiving and this applies to every subject in our lives. For example: it may be as simple as asking for directions or help with a project.

 

This brings me to our children. Feeling independent is important in our children’s growth process. Feeling they can create tasks and accomplish them helps build their sense of self and self esteem. Knowing they have everything inside of them to have the life they want, or simply just get through their school day is one of the principle truths I taught my own kids.

 

We want our kids to feel independent, not solitary, which can happen if they think they must do everything themselves without relying on others.

Everyone benefits when we ask for help was a phrase I often used with my children.  I wanted them to realize that if they asked for help, they would get what they wanted which was the knowledge they were looking for or physical help with something. I also wanted them to see that this process works both ways, in that each of us has the opportunity to feel special when another has requested help from us. I showed them examples of some of the great leaders in our history that asked others for help.

 

Not receiving the help we’ve asked for can be a good thing in that it can greatly encourage us to try a little harder to get what we want. The objective is to ask for the help we desire, but knowing we don’t have control whether another will give it to us. We don’t want to ever stop asking.

 

Teaching our children that asking for help is a sign of strength and not of weakness can help them foster a strong sense of independence and leadership in their childhood and into adulthood.

 

Please feel free to comment!

© 2014.  Sharon Ballantine.  All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 



Previous Posts

Where Did This Child Come From?
Often when you look at your children, you can easily see yourself or your spouse in their little faces. Maybe your son has his father’s eyes or your daughter has her mother’s smile. Sometimes the daughter wi

posted 4:03:26pm Nov. 22, 2014 | read full post »

How To Soothe Kids From Scary Dreams
  The dreams we have when we sleep are a natural part of who we are and how we live our lives. They may represent our hopes and dreams or our worst fears, which we may not even be consciously aware of.

posted 1:52:33pm Nov. 18, 2014 | read full post »

Mom Alert~ Putting Yourself First
Mothers can often put everyone else’s needs before their own. They make sure that all the kids are ready for school, delivered to their extra-curricular activities, have healthy meals, are listened to and feel

posted 4:13:10pm Nov. 15, 2014 | read full post »

Your Kids And Swearing
  Depending on your frame of reference, swearing in front of your kids and allowing them to swear is generally ok or it’s definitely not ok. And this may depend on what age they are. What does it mean

posted 2:35:33pm Nov. 11, 2014 | read full post »

Kids And What Motivates Their Learning
When you were going to school, did you cram before every test? If you did, you probably reread the chapters and notes in hopes that you would remember for the test. And often you did, but where's all that inform

posted 3:03:27pm Nov. 08, 2014 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.