Lynn v. Sekulow

Lynn v. Sekulow


Quick Question: Anybody Praying Harder Today?

posted by Rev. Barry W. Lynn

I don’t want to get into a big debate here about the value, if any, of prayer.  However, this is the National Day of Prayer, so designated by an act of Congress back in 1952.  President Obama, as required by law, signed a proclamation making it official for 2009.   He did not, however, hold any special event at the White House as had his predecessor George W. Bush.

So, did any readers pray more, longer, harder, with greater clarity or wisdom, or in any other improved fashion today because Congress told you to?  I’m thinking that no one can answer “yes” with a straight face.

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Pastor MacArthur

posted May 7, 2009 at 5:51 pm


Oh yeah I been prayin’ it up, bein’ you know, an American and all and knowin’ it’s my God given duty as an American citizen to pray on this most holy day of National prayer. American prayers being offered by American folks…aint nothin’ God likes more. I been praying to get rid of the homosexual threat, and to forgive the election of a foreigner as a president. GOD BLESS AMERICA and ONLY AMERICA!!!



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Lara Avara

posted May 7, 2009 at 6:20 pm


I’ve been praying that Bristol Palin, poster girl for the failure of abstinence only education, remain the spokesmodel for abstinence. Having her as the visual reminder of this egregious miseducation of the nation’s youth should keep this travesty in the public’s eye.



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Lara Avara

posted May 7, 2009 at 6:23 pm


Oh, I forgot. I direct this earnest plea to the Flying Spaghetti Monster. Ramen!



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Boris

posted May 7, 2009 at 7:34 pm


Pastor MacArthur, I sincerely hope your post is a poe.
Lara–rAmen!



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Craig

posted May 7, 2009 at 10:09 pm


I never did understand why anyone would waste their time praying. I may hope for something to come true, but frankly the only way things that I have wanted happened is by taking action. Prayer gets in the way of taking control on your own life to make things happen. Prayer for the sick is a waste of time at best and at worst gets in the way of dealing with the underlying issues.
A national day of prayer is a terrible idea because it institutionalizes government sanctioned religion. If you want to pray, go ahead and waste your time, but we surely don’t need the government to set aside a day especially for prayer.



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N. Lindzee Lindholm

posted May 7, 2009 at 10:59 pm


With all due respect Sir Rev. Barry W. Lynn, I have a difficult time looking at your name, seeing the title “Rev.” in front of it, and keeping a straight face since you are a minister and do not seem to appreciate the value of prayer or even know the reasoning behind why people pray. The goal of the National Day of Prayer is not to “pray more, longer, harder, or with greater clarity or wisdom”. Rev. Lynn, prayer is not an end in and of itself, but is a mere means to an end. The goal of prayer is not to change the will of God but to conform the petitioner’s heart to God’s will, likened to shaping a figure of clay into a jar on a potter’s wheel. Since petitioners offer thanks, praise, and prayer for the school, students’ attitude about the school may change, academic performance may increase, and the whole environment may become a more peaceful place. Since President Obama purports himself to be a “spiritual” man, it saddens me to see that he did not hold a special event at the White House to commemorate this event, yet another example of how the walk does not match the talk. My prayer for you, President Obama, and others is that the Holy Spirit knocks on the door of your heart and that you accept the invitation, honoring God by acts versus mere lip service.



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FSM

posted May 8, 2009 at 12:08 am


Ramen! Truman, an excellent President in my view, got this one wrong.



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Gwyddion9

posted May 8, 2009 at 1:07 am


N. Lindzee Lindholm…
Perhaps Rev. Barry W. Lynn doesn’t see god as you do.
Perhaps you’re one of those conservative Christians who only think
god and everything else should only be as you see it.
Perhaps it’s the conservative Christians and RR who have it wrong as
they like to make god in their own image and claim it’s the only way.
“You can safely assume that you’ve created God in your own image, when it turns out that God hates all the same people and things you do.” Sometimes attributed to Anne Lamott or Fr. John Weston.



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Rich

posted May 8, 2009 at 1:22 am


N. Lindzee Lindholm describes the purpose of prayer as an effort “to conform the petitioner’s heart to God’s will”. That could very well be. Frankly, I don’t care. Nor do I care what the purposes are of sun worshipping, human sacrifice or voodoo. All four forms are equal in their meaningless.
So, while N. may have hit the nail on the head as to the purpose of prayer, conforming a petitioner’s heart to God’s will would not be a valid government effort. Our government should not attempt to encourage or discourage anyone from religion. Simple as that, never quite sure how it can be so misunderstood.



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Your Name

posted May 8, 2009 at 5:42 pm


Rich,
I believe the messages etched in stone on our public buildings, and monuments over the first 50 to 100 years of our nations existence give clear indication where our government really stood.
I continue to be amazed that over 200 years later we feel so superior with our knowledge of the Constitution, and the intent of the forefathers. I believe their actions and legislation speak very clearly.
Denying the truth doesn’t change the truth.



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MAC

posted May 8, 2009 at 5:47 pm


I was thinking the same as N. Lindzee Lindholm.
It seems to be a bit of an oxy moron if a Revrend is shakey on the value of prayer.
What is the point of wearing the title of Rev?



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Wes

posted May 8, 2009 at 6:07 pm


Once again we see the limited and boxed-in thinking that so many religious people seem to have. MAC and Lindzee Lindholm both show how they absolutely cannot realize how different versions of the same basic religion can have separate tenets and by proxy so do their priests. Personally, I think that prayer is NEVER a secular activity and as such should NOT be endorsed by the government in any way. How this BS got through the Supreme Court is beyond me. By the way, I’m an atheist and a minister. Several “religious” organizations have their certification process on-line.
http://www.themonastery.org/



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DSJulian

posted May 8, 2009 at 6:29 pm


For Christians every day should be a National Day of Prayer since the Bible admonishes us to pray without ceasing. It is a sad state of affairs when the only time we all pray together is on a nationally mandated day. The other thing wrong with this is that the NDP events were commandeered by Focus on the Family which does not permit participation by anyone except Christians. So the event should be called the Exclusive National Day Of Prayer By Neofundamentalist Evangelical Christians Who Apparently Can’t Pray Without A Presidential Declaration, Permission From The Government, And James Dobson To Lead Them. I knew it was time to start praying harder when McCain/Palin got more than two votes…



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Rich

posted May 8, 2009 at 9:13 pm


MAC,
You seem to have too narrow a view of religion if you think that only those who believe in the efficacy of prayer can be religious. It seems to me to be well within the realm of possibility that there would be religious folks who believe in a god or gods who just simply don’t believe in prayer. Certainly, religion can take many forms, some modern, some traditional and some just way out there. This is America and a person can have any religion they want and even start one if they want.



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Rich

posted May 8, 2009 at 9:22 pm


Your Name,
I am not sure what you are referring to in terms of inscriptions upon buildings and monuments. A few examples would have been helpful. However, if I understand your drift, my questions about any prior inscriptions on monuments might be:
Are all these inscriptions religious?
Were all these inscriptions written by actual founders?
Is the completely normal human tendency to write overly-lofty phrases that may not reflect popular sentiment factored in when determining the importance of prior inscriptions?
How does one factor in a “godless” Constitution vs. a few religious inscriptions?
How does one factor in the overall value of a religious heritage that supported slavery?
Same question on suffrage?
etc, etc.



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Your Name

posted May 9, 2009 at 12:56 am


The Declaration of Independence addresses God and the Creator. It is self evident that our founders were crediting one God.
In the years between the time the Declaration and the Constitution were written our fore fathers didn’t change their position on God or country.
Slavery entered North America over 200 years before we declared our independence. In spite of the finger pointing at religion, and the fore fathers upbringing in the institution of slavery, they addressed the very devisive issue in the Constitution, and left that one to be handeled by the next generation.
The over all religious institutions opposed slavery. There is no doubt that there were many in the south that confused the only lifestyle they ever knew, with their religion.
Pretty understandable. Inexcusable perhaps, but understandable.



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N. Lindzee Lindholm

posted May 9, 2009 at 1:30 am


Hi Mr. Wes,
In response to your comment about not being able to “realize how different versions of the same basic religion can have separate tenets”, I do recognize that many religions have other spiritual practices. Nonetheless, most appreciate the value of prayer not only for the spiritual effects it has on a person, but also for the psychological and physical healing that can take place as well.
Although I do not completely endorse what this article says, the point is well taken that even secular people recognize the benefits of prayer based on the evidence from empirical research studies:
http://jmm.aaa.net.au/articles/11330.htm
I encourage you to try praying…you just may like it.
Lindzee



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Rich

posted May 9, 2009 at 1:33 am


Your Name,
Apparently the the founders did change their opinion because when the Constitution was written not a single word was devoted to the Christian cult. In fact, a prohibition of requiring a religious test was written into the document. Factor in the 1st Amendment and the prohibition against any “establishment of religion” and I think the facts start to pile up against you.
Besides that, Jefferson’s words, although rousing and poetic in nature speak to Nature’s God and not the God of Abraham. Odd that you left out Jefferson’s nod to Deism.
I don’t care when slavery started. The fact that it endured and was supported in theory by good religious people quite simply means that religion does no good. Hopefully, you can put aside your blind faith for a minute or two and ask yourself how could men steeped in the principles of Jesus have tolerated such a thing. If they could think slavery ok for even a minute, I am thinking that being steeped in Jesus may be generally worthless.



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Your Name

posted May 9, 2009 at 1:47 am


As far as sufferage goes there is no doubt there were injustices, but I’m not sure that our fore fathers were completely wrong to have voting restrictions.
Is it fair for someone who contributes nothing to this country to have the same voice as a tax paying citizen.
For instance, out here in California many of the tax increases are supported by those who pay no taxes. Why not?! Foolishness at the booth, and weak contribution by the majority have led to a 40 billion dollar shortfall. How do the rest of you Americans feel about your tax dollars making up for our deficit.
Off topic, but something to think about.
On topic. I didn’t pray any harder on National Prayer Day than any other day, but I am thankful for the freedom to do so.



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Mary-Lee

posted May 9, 2009 at 8:36 am


Is it fair for someone who contributes nothing to this country to have the same voice as a tax paying citizen.
As if the only contribution anyone can make to this country is paying taxes!



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Your Name

posted May 9, 2009 at 11:51 am


I find it hard to believe that anyone live in America and in a year has not paid one dime in taxes. Taxes are everywhere groceries are taxed, utilities are taxed, phone bills are taxed, gasoline is taxed. You have toll roads which is a tax, income tax, property tax (land, house, and cars) internet access is taxed, cell phones are taxed. I was unemployed for the entire year of 2008, I still had to pay taxes of $57 to the Federal Government, and $17 to the state. If you have a job in America you pay taxes. Who is not paying taxes? These are the kinds of statement that make people mad. You are under the conception that poor people dont pay taxes. I dare you to look at your phone bills, utility bills and the like. You will find out that just like you everyone is taxed. So stop the madness. It is time to find away to work together instead of division. You know in your heart the founding Fathers were wrong. They did not say if you don’t have land you can not vote they said “If you were not a white male you could not vote”. It is sad that in this day and age we have people who are trying to defend the position of someone when history has proven that position to be wrong. Slavery should not have been in there hearts but it was and it flourish so much that the country split because of it. Yet there are still people that will defend that position also. Then you wonder why it is so hard for the people who ancestors were wrong to understand your position. You should try understanding their position. I hope one day Martin dream will be fufilled but it has not been so far. Just because America elected a Black president I don’t see a difference in the attitudes of the people. Especially in the South, until the attitudes change nothing has changed. You need to be honest with yourself “You would not have voted for a Black man no matter what platform he ran on.” A republican or democrate, pro or anti abortion, christian or non christian.



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Jerry

posted May 9, 2009 at 11:59 am


Apparently the the founders did change their opinion because when the Constitution was written not a single word was devoted to the Christian cult. In fact, a prohibition of requiring a religious test was written into the document. Factor in the 1st Amendment and the prohibition against any “establishment of religion” and I think the facts start to pile up against you.
It is common knowledge, taught in elementary school, that our founders came here to escape religious persecution. That came in two forms. The first was the inability, by law, to worship in any way except that allowed by the government. The second was that the church had a prominent place in government, with all the power and abuse of that power that goes with it. I will speak on that abuse in a moment.
Knowing this, it is very logical for them (the founders) not to write religion into our political documents, in fact banning the two from operating together. That same logic states that they can also be religious.
I don’t care when slavery started. The fact that it endured and was supported in theory by good religious people quite simply means that religion does no good. Hopefully, you can put aside your blind faith for a minute or two and ask yourself how could men steeped in the principles of Jesus have tolerated such a thing. If they could think slavery ok for even a minute, I am thinking that being steeped in Jesus may be generally worthless.
The most obvious problem with this statement is that not all who supported slavery were Christians, but let me go on with the idea that some who supported slavery were Christians and this is where I will address the abuse I alluded to earlier.
No matter what I believe, I am still a human being. Part of what that means is that I am going to do things wrong. Just because I claim to be a Christian doesn’t mean that I suddenly stop making mistakes and anyone who tells you otherwise is simply proving my point.
Having said that, is it possible that a Christian can rationalize away slavery? Yes, it is, just as they can rationalize theft, sleeping around, lying, and any other wrong idea we can come up with. A good example is that Christians generally believe that we should not divorce, yet multiple polls have shown that the divorce rate amongst Christians mirrors that of non-Christians. If you can accept that a person can be a Christian and still make mistakes, then this fact isn’t surprising.
If there is a need for further examples, pick any figure in the bible apart from Jesus and you will find blatant mistakes among all of them.
As a Christian, the hope that I have rests in the knowledge that, while there will be consequences to my mistakes here, God will forgive me for them.
Have Christians made mistakes for centuries? Yes, they have. No one can argue with that. But the mistakes may have been made in the name of religion, but they were carried out by a flawed man, flawed in the same ways that we all are.



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Rich

posted May 9, 2009 at 8:37 pm


Jerry,
I agree with you, people are people and prone to the inherent weaknesses of being a mere human. We agree.
My point is that if Christianity cannot overcome these normal human shortcomings, what is the point of being a Christian. If it doesn’t make you a better person, what is all the fuss about?
As well, I don’t want to turn America over to a philosophy that has historically tolerated slavery and murder. There are far better ethical frameworks from which we can operate.
(BTW, terminology is important I suppose when it come to who is and who is not a founder. I don’t consider the Founders to be those who first came to America to escape religious persecution. I consider the Founders those who wrote the Constitution, only 7 of whom were foreign born.)



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N. Lindzee Lindholm

posted May 9, 2009 at 10:48 pm


Fr. John,
As a Christian, I don’t “hate” anyone. My God is Jesus Christ who coined the phrases “Love your enemies as yourself” and “do good to those who hate you”. I make it a common practice to turn the other cheek. Do you?
Lindzee



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Dmpc7777

posted May 10, 2009 at 3:03 pm


Childs Rights, By: Jeremiah Alderden May 7, 2009 Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) has been trying to raise support to get the Obama administration to sign a treaty with the united nations called, Rights of the
Child Treaty, it would allow the government to interfere with a parents right to
train and punish their children.
Where can I find all the info on this?
And yes I do pray more today then I did before…
God bless



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Dmpc777

posted May 10, 2009 at 4:39 pm


N. Lindzee Lindholm, I am not tring to make you feel bad but
you need to read and understand God’s word better.
God does hate things and some people please look into hewbrew,Greek also. If you would me help you I will let me know…



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Boris

posted May 10, 2009 at 5:42 pm


Dmpc777 what can you tell me about neuter plural nouns in Koine Greek?



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Jerry

posted May 10, 2009 at 5:48 pm


Rich,
How do you overcome what is now commonly referred to as human nature? If we break down slavery, we find that a small group of people profited from the labors of another group of people. They were able to get a great deal for a small amount of effort.
A great many people, Christian or no, are seriously tempted by the idea of getting with little risk or effort.
It is not something that can simply be enacted as a matter of course from the pulpit. If this were the case, there would be little need for us to attend church week-in and week-out. We could attend the more important sermons, get the gist of it and then move on.
The fact is, and one of the main reasons the Bible encourages us not to forsake the gathering of believers, the longer we are away from hearing and studying what is right, the longer we are away from those who are striving to do what is right, the more susceptible we are to rationalizing and doing what is wrong.
That is a very simple version of the argument, not taking any consideration for views contrary to what the Bible teaches that permeate our current culture, allowing an easy out for those on the fence of a certain decision to either do what is right or what is wrong.
Another argument is more of a psychological one. As a Christian, I struggle with many temptations. What happens when I fail to resist one or more? Commonly, most people have a high chance of, depending on what they failed at, telling themselves that since they failed, they don’t have to try anymore. This, of course, doesn’t work for all mistakes, but for a good deal of them.
An example of this comes from Weight Watchers. That is part of negative thinking that they have recognized as very common and added into their classes to educate those trying to lose weight, in order to help them be more successful.
Lastly, not all of things that are wrong are as cut and dry as slavery is to us today. Take cigarettes for example. There is nothing in the Bible clearly for or against, but it is not impossible to think that in the future, cigarettes could become illegal altogether. There is clear direction to follow the laws that we live under. Therefore, there could come a time when it we move from a place where is it fine for Christians to smoke to a time when it is not.
Now, in my mind, this is an extremely weak argument when put up against slavery, but the idea is there that a Christian could easily rationalize its practice by saying that it is legal to own slaves. I don’t agree, but the argument fits.
The bottom line is this – Christians are in a constant battle to do what is right even in the face of what can at times be overwhelming opposition. The fight will continue forever. Even as slavery, in the form we are speaking of, has been wiped from the face of modern America, other things happily took it’s place.



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Rich

posted May 11, 2009 at 12:30 am


Sorry Jerry, still not seeing any value to Christianity. Certainly, every now and then some Christian group does some good charitable work but so do many secular organizations. The real question still remains that if a nation of Christians could tolerate, endorse or promote slavery, is there any ethical value to religion? I understand that people can rationalize away anything but should not the whole body of American Christianity have done something earlier to curtail slavery? If the collective conscience of Christianity could not muster enough ethical clarity to do anything about slavery then I again say that it is quite useless. The only reason I bring this up is that we often hear many Christians claim Christianity to be a moral beacon that shows us the way to be better people and citizens. I don’t think so at all. While I can’t speak for each individual Christians out there, the general tone I hear from the Christian community is overwhelmingly intolerant of those who are Christian. Quite simply, Christianity just does not have sufficient moral standing to be trusted with directing a diverse country.
Here is what proves Christianity to be unnecessary. I have known some wonderful kind-hearted and caring people who are Christians. I have also seen the same characteristics in many atheists. I have known vile and embittered Christians and vile and embittered atheists. How can this be? Goodness, kindness and ethical behavior have nothing to do with religion. These qualities come from someplace else. If religion is not the determining factor, then we just don’t need it. We need to pursue that other thing.



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Rich

posted May 11, 2009 at 12:32 am


intolerant of those who are Christian
s/b
intolerant of those who aren’t Christian



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N. Lindzee Lindholm

posted May 11, 2009 at 7:55 pm


God hates sin but not people.



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Jerry

posted May 12, 2009 at 12:00 am


I understand that people can rationalize away anything but should not the whole body of American Christianity have done something earlier to curtail slavery? If the collective conscience of Christianity could not muster enough ethical clarity to do anything about slavery then I again say that it is quite useless.
Can Christians today stop the war? A large part of Christians believe as the rest of America.
Can Christians stop crime? How about just one crime?
Christians of that time could no more stop those who wanted to practice slavery than todays Christians can stop people from becoming victims of crime. It wasn’t just Christians that stopped slavery, it was a change in the attitude of a nation that caused the practice to be abolished.
While I can’t speak for each individual Christians out there, the general tone I hear from the Christian community is overwhelmingly intolerant of those who are Christian. Quite simply, Christianity just does not have sufficient moral standing to be trusted with directing a diverse country.
It is very easy to throw around the word intolerant. It is a two-edged sword. It is intolerant for someone to be angry at Christians about a perceived intolerance.
I say perceived for a reason. Intolerance is a buzzword nowadays. What is really happening is that Christians have a different opinion on a specific subject than other people.
You wouldn’t say that McCain supporters were intolerant of Obama supporters during the election. It doesn’t apply here either. Christians say there is only one way to Heaven. That disagrees with other views and so Christians are said to be intolerant because they won’t accept that another view can be right, as well.
Christians have a particular view about abortion or homosexuality. Because that view is contrary to what is accepted today, they are labeled intolerant.
To disagree with someone doesn’t make them intolerant, and if it did, then both sides would be rightly labeled intolerant.
Here is what proves Christianity to be unnecessary. I have known some wonderful kind-hearted and caring people who are Christians. I have also seen the same characteristics in many atheists. I have known vile and embittered Christians and vile and embittered atheists. How can this be? Goodness, kindness and ethical behavior have nothing to do with religion. These qualities come from someplace else. If religion is not the determining factor, then we just don’t need it. We need to pursue that other thing.
I agree that goodness, kindness and ethical behavior are not completely religious ideas. So, what is the difference between the atheist and the Christian?
And what could it be that both the kind Christian and the bitter Christian have in common?
The answer to both questions is that the Christian believes that they cannot live without God and that he died for our sins and that was the only way a fallen man would get into Heaven.
While the stereotypical ideas surrounding Christianity are nice and good, there is only one thing that sets a Christian apart from the average person.



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Rich

posted May 14, 2009 at 12:20 am


Jerry,
Not surprisingly you brush by the failure of the collective Christian culture to act earlier against slavery. And, once again I will ask you how such a self-proclaimed righteous and highly moral group could allow such a thing to exist?
I guess it comes down to this. If you are going to advertise Christianity as some sort of moral compass and hope to get access to the public coffers, wouldn’t it make sense show us some benefits of Christianity? I clearly understand that you believe that believing that Jesus is good thing for the individual. I think it is harmful for the individual. No problem though, we don’t have to agree on that. Our issue involves government support for religion, even if subtle and masked. When it comes to spending tax dollars or government man-hours, we should, if we are rational people, debate the efficacy of a government action.
If you want access to taxpayer money, I need some statement that can be used to show benefits for the nation if we choose to promote Christian values. I don’t know of any. We both agree, religion or a lack thereof does not make a citizen good or bad. We agree that both sides tolerated slavery. We both know that both sides tolerated denying equal rights to women. Both sides slaughtered Native Americans, etc, etc.
Religion gets way to much credit. It ain’t all that great. My personal belief is that religion actually inhibits the formation of ethics within a person and we would be better off without it on this planet. Too much reliance on faith and inflexible dogma while denying the value of natural reasoning I figure.
Bottom line for me is that you should do whatever you choose to do for yourself, just keep this religion stuff out of the government. If you can ever show a tangible proof of any benefits that government entanglement with religion can provide, then we can talk.



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harryoutdoors

posted May 18, 2009 at 12:26 am


Religion in politics can be ugly and ethics based upon a religion is an empty road leading to a drop off…
Harvard Human Rights Journal has an article titled “THE COMPLEXITY OF RELIGION ANDTHE DEFINITION OF “RELIGION” IN INTERNATIONAL LAW.
Note how many facets there can be to a religion.
Introduction: The Understandable, But Misguided, Quest for a Legal Definition of “Religion”
I. Difficulties in Defining “Religion”
A. The Underlying Methodological Difficulties in Defining “Religion”
1. Assumptions about the Underlying Nature of Religion
2. Types of Definition: Essentialist or Polythetic
B. Typical Deficiencies in Legal Interpretations of “Religion”
1. Incorporating Societal Value Judgments Regarding Familiar or Favored Religions
2. Failing to Consider Religion from the Perspective of Its Adversaries
II. Facets of Religion (in Lieu of a Definition of “Religion”)
A. Religion as Belief
B. Religion as Identity
C. Religion as a Way of Life
III. Religious Discrimination and Persecution
A. Two Types of Coercion in Religious Discrimination and Persecution
1. Coercion That Disrupts or Interferes with Religion
2. Coercion That Enforces or Promotes Religious Conformity
B. Agents of Religious Persecution
1. The State as Persecutor
2. Inter-Religious and Societal Persecution
C. Whether It Is Religious Persecution
1. Why There Is Religious Persecution Versus Whether There Is Persecution
2. Mixed Motives: Gender
3. Other Mixed Motives: Race, Ethnicity, Identity
4. Religious Persecution or the Application of “Neutral Laws”
Conclusion
According to the Bible TRUE CHRISTIANS are those who admit they not only are imperfect but are actually blind beggars in the streets without a means to find their next meal much less great leaders of the moral compass for the masses.
Notice I said we are the ones who admit this flaw…everyone has this flaw…we are born with it yet, few admit it and those who don’t admit being blind are those who follow their desire to be their own god and to find their own ethics within their blindness and lead the masses into pits of despair because of one thing…pride!
TRUE CHRISTIANS vs RELIGIOUS PEOPLE differentiate themselves by allowing God to TEACH, LEAD, HUMBLE and sometimes EXALT them as HE wishes.
To say Christians are wrong to want others to know the True Savior who heals our souls is to say the Red Cross is wrong to want to set up medical tents in famine wrought countries….are the Red Cross workers perfect? Are the Doctors and Nurses not subject to the same temptations as say, the truck drivers who deliver healthy water?
Red cross workers have manuals that help them to help people live healthier, keep from getting sick, keep themselves and loved ones safer and teach others to share this knowledge…Christians have a manual also that points people to the True Savior of their souls, help them sort out life, help them discover what causes them to keep destroying themselves and their loved ones…and gives them assurance of their fellowship with God who loves them.
A person who has accepted Christ by faith as the Bible teaches would still have a heartbeat much like a non-believer…he would have to get a haircut if he wanted to be clean-cut or not…he would still have to got to a dentist and have his teeth checked out just like anyone else…he is still human.
Unlike others who reject Christ the Christian always has someone he can go to for answers to life’s problems…he has a Comforter who lives within him (the Holy Spirit ) and offers the believer peace if he will just realize it.
Christians have the assurance of eternal life which is NOT dependent upon following any creed or ritual or performance and THIS SEPERATES CHRISTIANITY from all other religions.
The only instruction we have about being RELIGIOUS is in James.
James 1:27
Pure religion and undefiled before God and the Father is this, To visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, and to keep himself unspotted from the world.
As far as slavery…Apostle Paul put that to rest after addressing the issue by equalizing the status of bond or free
Galatians 3:28
There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus…
So, who has a beef against that?



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Hannah

posted May 20, 2009 at 11:25 pm


I hope all of you come to terms with God before you die. I had a philosophy professor in college present eternity in this light. If you believe in Jesus and His gift of love while you are alive, then when you die, what have you gained? EVERYTHING!! However, if you believe there is no God and Jesus was just a man, then you die, what have you lost? EVERYTHING!! The whole point of this debate is that what you believe is up to you, but why not take a chance and examine the evidence for yourself. I have struggled with the idea of whether or not there truly is a God, and, if there is, if there is a heaven and/or hell. Frankly, after researching the evidence, I have been brought to my knees before God almighty. I know beyond a shadow of a doubt that He is real and I will spend eternity with Him in heaven. Prayer is not a waste of my time as it is one of the foundations on which my life is lived. I will be praying for all of you because I know that God loves every one of you and I want His best for you. He can bless you in ways you can’t ever imagine. I am blessed simply for being born into a country where I can believe in what I want to believe in. God Bless America!



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Previous Posts

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Thank you for visiting LynnvSekulow. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here is another blog you may also enjoy: Jay Sekulow: Faith and Justice  Happy Reading!

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