Kingdom of Priests

Kingdom of Priests


My Son the Druid

posted by David Klinghoffer

100 McGinn sets record straight-Ballard photo.jpg

In introducing Dungeons & Dragons to my oldest son, Ezra (age 8), I was amused, bemused and ever so slighted worried by his instant attraction to wanting his character to be a druid. In D&D, druids are kind of lame characters to play so I managed to talk him out of it. An angle on the subject that I didn’t share with Ez is that druidism, in the sense of environmental paganism, far from being extinct, is ascendant at least in our metro area. I also reflected that while Ezra doesn’t know it, he likely has a bit of a druidic genetic heritage himself.
We live in the environs of Seattle, where the citizens chose a new mayor recently but seemed to think they were electing the arch-druid. Mike McGinn won based on his environmental credentials and as far as I can tell, pretty much nothing else (Sierra Club activist, rides a bicycle around town instead of a car; the photo of him above should be credited to my friend and reader Steve Shay).
As for our family background, when I wrote my first book, about being adopted and about conversion to Judaism, I researched my birth father to the best of my ability (he resisted) and discovered Welsh roots as the most prominent thread in his genealogy. Wales was the heartland of the druids. 
Not much is known about them except from hostile Roman historians. In the Annals, Tacitus tells about how the Roman governor went after the druidic stronghold on the island of Mona — now Anglesey in North Wales. Bad guys they were, apart from worshipping trees, engaging in human sacrifice which they deemed a useful expedient in predicting the future. I loved this passage about the Roman assault on Mona:

On the shore stood the opposing army with its dense array of armed warriors, while between the ranks dashed women, in black attire like the Furies, with hair dishevelled, waving brands. All around, the Druids, lifting up their hands to heaven, and pouring forth dreadful imprecations, scared our soldiers by the unfamiliar sight, so that, as if their limbs were paralysed, they stood motionless, and exposed to wounds. Then urged by their general’s appeals and mutual encouragements not to quail before a troop of frenzied women, they bore the standards onwards, smote down all resistance, and wrapped the foe in the flames of his own brands. A force was next set over the conquered, and their groves, devoted to inhuman superstitions, were destroyed. They deemed it indeed a duty to cover their altars with the blood of captives and to consult their deities through human entrails.

Actually they sound more interesting in Tacitus than they do in Dungeons & Dragons.


Advertisement
Comments read comments(5)
post a comment
peppylady (Dora)

posted December 4, 2009 at 11:23 pm


I know we live in a small world but at this time a person who lean to being environmentalist or rode his bike wouldn’t get elected to public office here.
One tried for a county commissioner and lost.
Coffee is on
http://peppylady.blogspot.com/



report abuse
 

Serena

posted December 5, 2009 at 11:55 am


What? Was that it? Did i miss part of this article? Is there a conclusion? I am missing the point that he is making. I believe there is a point here and that it needs to be made.



report abuse
 

- from Wales too-

posted December 5, 2009 at 1:40 pm


i’ve always been drawn to Arthurian stories-
all of my life-still am -in my mid-40′s-
about 2 years ago i found out i have Welsh blood-
surprised and fascinated me!
maybe some things are passed literally”through the blood”
G-d bless you and your son -
a Welsh girl :)
i used to live near Seattle,so i get that too!



report abuse
 

Rabbi Jonathan Freirich

posted December 5, 2009 at 2:09 pm


Druids are a much maligned character class in D&D – in all of the versions I have played, which include every one but the latest, version 4, a druid can be played with great effectiveness by most players.
Playing D&D, and being a rabbi, and being Jewish, and using it to teach all sorts of good values to kids, are all consistent, as far as I am concerned.



report abuse
 

AC

posted December 7, 2009 at 11:28 am


I’m surprised that you are teaching your son to play D&D given your orthodox Judaism. Perhaps you are more broad-minded and thoughtful then I first suspected.



report abuse
 

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

Another Blog To Enjoy!!!
Thank you for visiting Kingdom of Priests. This blog is no longer being updated. Please enjoy the archives. Here is another blog you may also enjoy: Kabballah Counseling Happy Reading!

posted 11:24:22am Aug. 16, 2012 | read full post »

Animal Wisdom: The Voice of the Serpent
Our family watched Jaws together the other evening -- which, in case you're wondering, I regard as responsible parenting since our kids are basically too young to be genuinely scared by the film. The whole rest of the next day, two-year-old Saul was chattering about the "shark teeth." "Shark teeth g

posted 3:56:33pm Mar. 16, 2010 | read full post »

Reading Wesley Smith: Why the Darwin Debate Matters
If the intelligent-design side in the evolution debate doesn't receive the support you might expect from people who should be allies, that may be because they haven't grasped why the whole thing matters so urgently. I got an email recently from a journalist whom I'd queried on the subject. "All told

posted 5:07:12pm Mar. 15, 2010 | read full post »

The Mission of the Jews
Don't miss my essay over at First Things on the mission of the Jews to the world. This, I think, the key idea that the Jewish community needs to absorb at this very unusual cultural moment, for the time is so, so right. Non-Jews are waiting for us to fulfill the roll God gave us in the Torah. Please

posted 6:14:16pm Mar. 05, 2010 | read full post »

Darwin at the Mountains of Madness: Evolution & the Occult
Of all the regrettable cultural forces that Darwinism helped unleash, perhaps the most surprising and seemingly unlikely is its role in sparking the creation of modern occultism. Charles Darwin himself could not have been less interested in the topic. But no attempt to assess the scope of his legacy

posted 2:04:11pm Mar. 04, 2010 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.