J Walking

J Walking


Smacking Huckabee

posted by David Kuo

Well, it continues. Drudge has a hot red link to a YouTube video in which Gov. Huckabee (a more rotund Gov. Huckabee) :Lost, of course, is any sense of context, any sense as to what was going on – paying for schools for instance. But none of that matters. For a certain segment of Republicans raising taxes for any reason is an act of heresy – just like talking about God is an act of heresy for certain Democrats. Here is a different perspective on Huckabee from Governing Magazine who named him on of the top public officials in 2005:

Huckabee, who has been testing the 2008 presidential waters, is a true exemplar of the concept of “compassionate conservatism.” He has overseen breakthroughs in health coverage for children, education management and school finance. He also sponsored the largest tax cuts Arkansas has ever seen, as well as the state’s biggest road construction package. And the state this year racked up the largest budget surplus in its history.



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Elvis Elvisberg

posted November 12, 2007 at 7:58 pm


Gosh, he seems to think that revenues should bear some relationship to expenditures. He’s a heretic! Burn him!
I couldn’t vote for Huckabee, because I disagree with him on too many issues, but I want to like him. I don’t think that he’s on a jihad. He might be able to ameliorate the fact-free, black-and-white state of our political discourse.
Unfortunately, his role, rationale, and attempt to muddy the waters regarding the parole of Wayne Dumond are very troubling to me. By all indications, he gave into Republican anti-Clinton hysteria, and worked for the groundless pardon of a man who then went on to murder at least one other person.

“I don’t believe that he had access to, or read, the law enforcement records or parole commission’s files — even by then,” the official said. “He already seemed to have made up his mind, and his knowledge of the case appeared to be limited to a large degree as to what people had told him, what Jay Cole had told him, and what he had read in the New York Post.”

I don’t believe that he’s accounted for this.
Lord knows the last thing we need is another leader who evaluates facts based on whether or not they’re politically correct, when he deigns to consider facts at all.



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Donny

posted November 13, 2007 at 9:36 am


“Lord knows the last thing we need is another leader who evaluates facts based on whether or not they’re politically correct, when he deigns to consider facts at all.”
So Elvis,
Obviously that elimiantes a Clinton in your voting choices.
Or, can there be allowances for mistakes in the Christian concept of justice?



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Thinker

posted November 13, 2007 at 10:30 am


There is a long article in “Salon” about Huckabee today. I can’t seem to paste the link, but it certainly is a mixed picture.



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Elvis Elvisberg

posted November 13, 2007 at 12:14 pm


Donny– Are you referring to Sen. Clinton’s vote for the Iraq invasion? It’s true, that mistake does weigh heavily against her.
What bugs me about this Dumond story isn’t that Huckabee made a mistake– it’s that it appears as though he made his mind up about whether a guy should be pardoned based on far-right anti-Clinton conspiracy theories, and declined to engage the facts at all. It’s not the mistake itself, it’s the lack of curiosity and the method of decisionmaking.
Like I said, I hope that there’s a rational exoneration for Huckabee here. He really seems like a thoughtful, likable guy. I disagree with him on most issues, and I won’t vote for him. But hey, that doesn’t mean we all have to hate each other.



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Doug

posted November 13, 2007 at 2:50 pm


That’s an interesting story, Elvis. But for the two dead women it sounds like a rookie mistake, though. I’m more worried about his views on trade which I see as the other side of the immigration coin. I like Huckabee a lot, but I’m kind of a single-issue voter this election. Free trade and a pathway to citizenship for all immigrants are minimum requirements for my vote. I’m waiting to see where Huckabee stands on that.



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canucklehead

posted November 13, 2007 at 2:54 pm


are David’s writers on strike today?



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Doug

posted November 13, 2007 at 5:23 pm


Canucklehead, I go by my given name and it doesn’t suit me like your nickname does you.



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aquaman

posted November 13, 2007 at 5:33 pm


Canucklehead,
I assume David is dropping off for a day or two, as he does from time to time, on account of his treatments. Let’s keep him in our prayers.
Peace.



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canucklehead

posted November 14, 2007 at 1:13 am


Wondered about that, Aqua! thx! and am praying for him!



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Adam S

posted November 14, 2007 at 9:04 am


I am close to Doug, although it will be hard to be single issue on these. Democrats seem to be against trade and both Republican and Democrats seem to be against immigration. I thought the driver’s license issue in NY was ridiculous. If anyone actually read what was proposed it was very reasonable. It would have been better for security to have legitimate info on people and it would have been better for drivers to allow people to get licenses and insurance. Instead we now have nothing.



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Elvis Elvisberg

posted November 14, 2007 at 10:05 am


Well, Adam S, we do have our precious, precious hatred. That’s more than nothing.



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PatientWitness

posted November 14, 2007 at 3:18 pm


Adam S, I don’t think Dems are against trade. That would be self-defeating for them. However, the Dems do seem to pay more attention to the issues of job outsourcing, working poor, and shrinking middle class and widening gap between rich and poor. That’s not the same as being against trade.
Further, the Repubs, possibly Dems as well, are paying lip service to the folks who are anti-immigrant. I emphasize Repubs because as the party of business (as opposed to labor) they don’t have a problem with cheap labor in the form of immigrants. I think Dems and Repubs could get behind a guest worker program with tighter border controls, but to pass legislation to that effect would require both parties putting aside other differences and attempts at power plays and bill-stuffing, and working together on this one particular issue.
I agree with your point above that what’s needed is clear thinking and analysis of the issues with less partisan reactionism.



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Adam S

posted November 14, 2007 at 5:07 pm


PatientWitness, I think that in the end it does mean the same because both the candidates and the public have a hard time understanding that the US is the biggest winner in global outsourcing. We outsource low cost jobs (which does hurt low income, low skilled workers) but we are the outsource recipients for a lot of high skilled, expensive work. If we restricted our outsourcing it would be a violation of international trade rules (or if not the actual rules, then the perception of violation of the rules). So others would often retaliate against us. The other issue is that those low cost outsourcing really helps the poor. We now spend less on food, less on clothes, less on almost any good (as a percentage of income) than any point in the last 100 years. Instead we spend more on housing, entertainment and non-material goods. Those are all things that can’t be outsourced.
The answer is that we need to improve our education system, not restrict job outsourcing or trade. Republicans in general believe that we can improve the education system without increasing spending and only providing sticks. Democrats seem to believe that protecting the education system is more important than making changes that will improve education.



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PatientWitness

posted November 14, 2007 at 11:00 pm


Hi again, Adam S,
I think we may have to agree to disagree on the point that outsourcing is beneficial to the people in this country. I’ll concede that lower prices are a good thing; however, what good are lower prices if the displaced breadwinner has to work 2 or 3 jobs to make ends meet? Quality of life carries a value that is difficult to quantify so that factor is left out of the metrics.
And the trend of high-tech workers coming here (in-sourcing?) is quite simply another way for companies to hire workers, albeit educated ones, at lower wages. Indeed, workers here on H1-B visas do command lower average salaries than those whom they’ve displaced. And while I don’t have figures available, I do believe that the number of, for example, engineering grads is more than sufficient to meet the demand of industry without having to bring in H1-B workers.
Here’s an example: We have in this area at least a large number of nurses who have come from other countries, notably the Phillipines. They start work at a lower pay, which also brings down wages for local grads. But local grads are hard to find because the training schools are short of qualified teachers. The local colleges have a waiting list of students who would like to study nursing but cannot because of class size restrictions. This necessitates the hiring of more H1-B workers, again at reduced wages, and this cycle continues with results including reduced wages, reducing both the short-term need for nurses and the long-term interest of local students in this type of work.
I will also concede that too many people, Dems especially, have a greater interest in protecting the status quo of teaching instead of working to fix the obvious problems, such as Johhny still can’t f***ing read! In my opinion, teachers should have degrees in their subject matter, demonstrate competence in those subjects, and the degree in Education should be abolished.
Personally, I would like to see any corporation that reduces its American workforce to send jobs oversees lose any and all tax exemptions, and be taxed at a higher rate than other US corporations. Unfair, you say? No more unfair than for the corporation to get rid of American workers simply to increase profits and fatten the paychecks of the managers.
Note, too, that we haven’t even begun to discuss things like quality of work, work ethic, insufficient resources for outsourced workers, insurance and health care, and perhaps most importantly, the spiritual aspects of these decisions. Corporations do not have a soul, but the people within them who make these decisions behind the color of “business” certainly do.



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