J Walking

J Walking


Guest Blogger: Testifying to Stephen Colbert

posted by J-Walking

Today, guest blogger Patton Dodd, Beliefnet’s Christianity Editor who is based in Colorado Springs, comments on the reception of “Tempting Faith”:

Though I’ve had the pleasure of working with David Kuo in recent weeks, like most everyone I read his book only after having the media tell me what it was about. From MSNBC I learned that Kuo’s book was a bombshell of revelations on how the Bush White House had absconded its faith-based initiative and mocked religious leaders. From “60 Minutes” I learned that Kuo’s main contention was that compassionate conservativism, the centerpiece of Bush’s 2000 presidential campaign platform (and a primary reason I voted for him the first time around), was never given one iota of the promised funding. From “Good Morning America” and a host of other interviews I learned that Kuo is arguably a bit naive–expecting a politician to live up to their promises is silly (people don’t actually vote based on those promises, do they?)–and that “Tempting Faith” is just the story of a wounded lover.

Then I read “Tempting Faith.”

Bombshell revelations? Almost none.

Account of faith-based initiative? Fascinating insider’s take, but little new news.

Naivete? Kuo says in his prologue that there’s no surprise in politicians being political, but that when Christians vote their faith, they expect something more than mere politics. That’s not naivete: it’s realism.

The big flaw of “Tempting Faith” isn’t naivete; it’s that it doesn’t assume that religious leaders use Bush as much as Bush uses them. They do, as Tony Perkins of the Family Research Council acknowledged last week.

But here’s the “Testing Faith” story that everyone seems to be missing: it’s an answer to evangelical prayers.

As the Washington Post reported, James Dobson, Tony Perkins, and other religious readers are incensed about Kuo’s book. Instead, they should be thanking God for it. People who care about Jesus should be gladdened by Kuo’s moment in the spotlight. He may be saying harsh things about the Bush White House; he may claim that evangelical leaders are uncricitcal in their support of the Right; but he is also–cleary and repeatedly–testifying about Jesus.

When evangelicals talk about a wanting a godly nation, they aren’t talking about theocracy. What they are talking about is the spread of the gospel–more and more people discovering the good news of Jesus, which is that God loves them and wants to restore them along with the eventual restoration of all things. It’s tough to remember this, and tough to believe it, in a time when evangelicalism has become so tied into the politics of morality and the platform of one party. Even some evangelicals forget that the work of the gospel isn’t a political project. But, media representations to the contrary, many evangelicals don’t forget. And when most evangelicals pray for America or advocate for more Christianity in their nation, what they mean is that they want people to know about Jesus. Not to force Jesus down anyone’s throat, but just to give people a chance to hear good news.

“Tempting Faith” is David Kuo’s story of embracing this good news–then forgetting it, then remembering it, becoming confused about it, and trying again to live by it. That’s the story of every Christian. Kuo’s story takes place in the context of another smaller (not larger) story about contemporary American politics, but the main tale is about one man learning to follow God.

With “Tempting Faith,” we have something evangelicals ask God for all the time: a testimony of faith coming from within mainstream culture. Evangelicals are forever talking about “engaging the culture” and being relevant and making sure that they don’t become so subcultural that no one has a chance to hear about Jesus. Right now, with David Kuo’s book, evangelicals are getting what they hoped for.

In the opening pages, Kuo shares his story of coming to know Jesus. Throughout the book, he writes openly of the very real struggles Christians face in following Jesus. On television and radio last week, Kuo alluded to this story again and again. On “The Colbert Report,” he said the words, “Jesus rose from the dead.”

Christians, take note: David Kuo is telling his story of following Jesus, and he’s been given a huge platform on which to tell it. His testimony isn’t as juicy as his stories about Bush and Beltway politics, but it’s his central story, and–here’s a bit of Christian naivete for you–it’s the story that’ll last.



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Tenoch

posted October 24, 2006 at 5:54 pm


Thank you Patton Dodd for responding to what’s *actually in* David Kuo’s book and thank you Kuo for posting this. A refreshing departure from the mean-spirited, conspiratorial rumblings of those devoted to bringing you down no matter the cost.Thank you for remindinng us that the politically-popular fundamentalist agendas of today must not be confused with enacting a way of life based directly on Jesus’ teachings.Good news indeed.



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Bill

posted October 24, 2006 at 5:58 pm


They don’t want a theocracy, but they want government mandated Christian prayers in the schools; the 10 Commandments made part of our law (ignoring the other 603 in the Torah), and openly assert that only Christians should be in government. How many hungry are fed by Dobson, Bauer, Robertson, Falwell, Jones, Swaggart?



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Bubba

posted October 24, 2006 at 6:04 pm


Patton, if NBC’s cable news network and CBS and ABC all missed the central point of Kuo’s book, that is (at the very least) a dark lining to the silver cloud that you believe is the real message of David Kuo’s book. It’s possible that the mainstream media choose to misunderstand and misrepresent his book because doing so helps it fit their template of a collapsing Republican leadership and their prediction/desire of depressed GOP turnout. It’s also possible that Kuo’s publishers are facillitating that misconception by rushing the book to press and by trying to sell the book as both a religious memoir and a political expose. But is it not possible that Kuo is at least partially complicit in this confusion? If you’re right about the book’s contents, wouldn’t a better subtitle be, “An Account of Walking With Jesus” rather than “An Inside Story of Political Seduction”? If the subtitle wasn’t David’s idea, was it made against his expressed objections? And, besides, the excerpt David provided below hardly seems to be part of an autobiographical account of one man’s struggles in coming to know Jesus. If — in order to understand the book’s message — we must ignore the media’s coverage of the book, the book’s front cover, and even the gist of an excerpt that David himself presumably selected for this blog, then something may be seriously wrong with the way that message is being conveyed. And it might not be solely the fault of us mean-spirited, conspiratorial Christian conservatives.



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Bubba

posted October 24, 2006 at 6:07 pm


(And, briefly, Bill misconstrues Christian conservatives from the beginning: most don’t desire mandated prayers, just room for voluntary prayers. But if he’s going to distort our positions, perhaps turn-about is fair play: since Bill opposes the Ten Commandments, he must want to make legal perjury, theft, and even murder.) (Not fun when the shoe’s on the other foot, is it?)



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Robert E. Patterson

posted October 24, 2006 at 6:38 pm


Question for David Kuo. David, on pages 126-127 in Tempting Faith you reference the Duty of Hope speech Bush delivered in Indy on July 22, 1999. Do you know who was responsible for writing that speech? I believe John DiIulio had a hand in it but were there others? Did Marvin Olasky have any direct input in the drafting of the speech? Rob Patterson



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trulyalarmed

posted October 24, 2006 at 6:49 pm


David Kuo’s story of embracing this good news–then forgetting it, then remembering it, becoming confused about it, and trying again to live by it. That’s the story of every Christian. Not EVERY Christian. Kou’s experience is certainly not mine, nor vice versa. Generalizations abound and are an unfair assessment of the experiences of we Christians who don’t forget, who aren’t confused and who have never abandoned our faith regardless of the circumstances we may face.



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D. Simon Parentis

posted October 24, 2006 at 7:21 pm


I never supported Bush. I didn t vote last cycle, will not vote in this one or the next, because I am no longer of the belief that my vote can make a difference. I am not defeated on this point. I simply do not think the future is in the hands of whoever wins political office. But I still do not like what Kuo has done here. The world did not see Jesus in Kuo s book because the part about Jesus is lost to behavior that is comprehensively without honor, faith, and charity. Jesus would never have played so central a part in this finger-pointing charade; and He never would have allowed Himself to be so abused, even writing a book wherein He presents salacious and unsubstantiated stories about others. He certainly would not have soiled His name by doing this shortly before an election, thereby making it seem He is just another spiteful knife player in a political game. The reason people are upset is because Kuo claims to be Christian while behaving very much like a typical non-believer who gains a chance to exploit others for gain. They feel betrayed because for years Kuo was happy to engaged in their sin and now thinks he can escape his sinful role by merely admitting it in a tell-all book for sale. Kuo appears to them like a thief who robbed and destroyed right along with other theives, but then who ratted on the others when he saw for himself some greater benefit in doing so. It is all so awful, and it makes the people of God, especially Kuo himself, look so petty, foolish, and lost. Thinking of the people Kuo criticizes, and of how they now are responding, I see they have a right to be angry, even if what Kuo says is true. Kuo is not honorable here, despite that so many people give him praise. His stories were intentionally presented in a way to inflame, to cause shock and anger. His victims certainly do not see Jesus gentleness in him. They do not see Jesus longsuffering compassion and concern for their souls. They instead see what they would see were David Kuo a heathen– spitefulness and rank political gamesmanship. Many are no doubt eager to retaliate, seeing Kuo s talk of Christ as just camouflage for something that is every bit as sordid as what they themselves are being accused of. The whole thing, all of it, is depressingly false. I am not offended by the fact that Bush and Company call me names. I in fact expect lost people to behave in this way (surely we can t expect them to act kindly toward us, though we should act kindly toward them, a thing David Kuo has failed to do). Rather than stick it to them, Jesus would have sought to win their souls by exchanging love for their cynicism in the same way He exchanged righteousness for our unrighteousness. Even if what Kuo has reported is true, Kuo himself behaved falsely, in stealth, without honor, and he did this using Christian catchphrases to make his behavior seem above reproach. He is exploiting Christ in the same way he claims Bush exploits Him.



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AA

posted October 24, 2006 at 7:25 pm


How many children have been “fed” by Dobson, Falwell, et al?Hundreds of millions. It all starts with the family.The “one” not sold out to MTV and Progressives. Time to get a grip “Christian people,” and see that “the Left” is concerned about hedonism and socialism.In proper terms: Good people paying for the filthy habits of bad people. There is more compatibility with the GOP for Christians, then anything sold to us by “the Left.”



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Jwoodia

posted October 24, 2006 at 7:58 pm


Mr. Kuo, I saw a pre-recorded taping of your book reading on C-SPAN2 on Sunday morning. I went and got your book several hours later and read it from cover to cover in the bookstore. I started crying about 2/3 of the way through, and continued to the end. What a bitter enlightenment it was–confirmation of truths I had begun suspecting several years ago, but wanted to deny.I find nothing salacious or cruel in your book. I find a painfully honest biography, a wonderful testimony, and one man’s viewpoint of his experiences–through the lens of his love of Jesus Christ. Thank you for being willing to open yourself up to the inevitable scrutiny and judgement that writing such a book will bring. The sad fact is, and I’ve been seeing it, hearing it, and reading it–that the harshest judgement will come from your fellow Christians, those who should love you the most.Stay the course, David. The old testament prophets, like you, spoke the truth eloquently and courageously–and look what their own people did to them. God bless you and your family.



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JT

posted October 24, 2006 at 8:42 pm


re: D. Simon Parentis’ comments — Was Jesus “gentle” in the face of the abuses and hypocrisies of the Pharisees? You feeling sorry for Caesar and his courtiers is unnecessary. They don’t need your pity. They can take care of themselves and I doubt that their feelings are hurt too deeply. They have power, wealth, and violence on their side. From their perspective they don’t need Christ for anything beyond a political prop. Yes, God is Love but he is also Truth.



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D. Simon Parentis

posted October 24, 2006 at 9:30 pm


JT asked: “Was Jesus “gentle” in the face of the abuses and hypocrisies of the Pharisees?” The scriptures never calls believers to judge others as Christ is able to judge. It instead commands us not to let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen. And do not grieve the Holy Spirit of God, with whom you were sealed for the day of redemption. Get rid of all bitterness, rage and anger, brawling and slander, along with every form of malice. Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you.I see no shred of this motivation in David Kuo s interviews. I see none of it in his comments even on this blog concerning Jesus self appointed PR representatives. Imagine how the people he had in mind must feel upon hearing him judge them so casually, so dogmatically. They likely now dismiss him of doing to them precisely what h claims they do to others. I do not see Christian charity in his book. It is such a political play, dressed up in Jesus. There is a reason why so many on the left are so gleefully jumping aboard Kuo s ship because he has attacked so many on the right when it is probably the case that everyone is guilty. The left does not feel betrayed. Only the right feels it because it was the right that found itself in Kuo s crosshairs. I simply cannot see Jesus here in any of this. Most tellingly, the world doesn t see Jesus here either. It only sees the salacious things– the rank politics, the curses, the alleged hypocrisy, the slander, the backbiting, the devastating revelations things that ought to have been dealt with more honorably, rather than in the sort of public hit job we are seeing here. Again, as Christians, we need to consider the lives even of those who are alleged to have slandered us. We must consider the persons even of those who failed to give us money they have promised. It is not in our power to brand them Pharisees as you imply we may do, and then judge them harshly, as Christ was able to do in His day. That sort of power is far above our pay grade, despite that some Christians are said to have executed it. We are instead called to sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts. Always be ready to give an explanation to anyone who asks you for a reason for your hope, but do it with GENTLENESS and REVERENCE, keeping your conscience clear, so that, WHEN YOU ARE MALIGNED, those who defame your good conduct in Christ may themselves be put to shame. David Kuo did none of this, and sadly, he is now unable to stand innocently before those he has accused. It is important that we stand innocent even before those who ridicule us. Kuo is simply engaged in a war against political enemies. I do not see Christ here. We may speak the truth – but it must be done in love, with the purpose of calling those who are wrong to redemption. All Kuo has done is caused the left to even further ridicule believers (we see it here – right before us), and made so many others feel like victims. Christ is not being elevated in all of this awfulness. His name is being maligned.



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Maren K.

posted October 25, 2006 at 1:38 am


Patton Dodd ~ Thank you for writing so eloquently and succinctly what has been roiling around in my head. It was as if a laser beam of light cut through the fog and clarified my thoughts. It was a blessing.



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Mike

posted October 25, 2006 at 2:41 pm


Patton Dodd… well written and timely in this whole wirlwind concerning David. I believe that Jesus and God and david are the only ones who truly know David’s heart. But his bringing about so much conversation regarding Jesus is a good thing.To Bubba and D. Simon and the rest of the Christian community who see their vision of how Christ thinks and would act, it was the religious establishment of the time who handed Him over to be crucified. He was ridiculed and denounced byt the very people God sent Him to save. There are many different ways to worship and I think that declaring that your personal approach is the one true way minimizes the whole point of this……. David has raised some very real and needed questions by sharing his struggle and opening himself up to the critics all in the name of declaring his personal love for Christ and how it has changed his life. Christ came to save sinners, not just those who feel like their way is the only way. Remember His Way is the Only Way and I believe we all need to appreciate that He speaks to each of us in terms and situations that we can individually accept…. and we should give Glory to David’s reclaimation rather than critique it or even question it!



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Reginald

posted October 25, 2006 at 2:46 pm


David, I was researching comments on the book and thought this was hurtful but wanted your comment on this group…… http://www.townhall.com/Columnists/BrandonLerch/2006/10/20/saving_face_the_political_elitism_of_david_kuo



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Bubba

posted October 25, 2006 at 4:21 pm


Mike: Remember His Way is the Only Way and I believe we all need to appreciate that He speaks to each of us in terms and situations that we can individually accept…. and we should give Glory to David’s reclaimation rather than critique it or even question it! Unless you want to argue that David Kuo’s book should be canonized as an authoritative part of Scripture, we fellow Christians ought to be allowed to criticize it where we think doing so is necessary or at least appropriate. We ought to do so in love, but the New Testament is clear that sometimes we must rebuke our brothers (see Mt 18:15-17 and I Tim 5:19-20). If it’s the case that David’s book is being seen by NBC’s news network and CBS and ABC as more of a polemical against Bush than a testimony of Christ, then maybe some of the responsibility for that lies with the writer. Afterall, the book’s subtitle isn’t “A Testimony of Walking with Jesus.” It’s “An Inside Story of Political Seduction.”



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HYDRANGEA

posted October 25, 2006 at 7:09 pm


After all is said and done about David Kuo’s 15 minutes of fame…which WILL end at which time his phone WILL stop ringing and he will be left with the possible fallout of his book (a democrat controlled agenda? David, is that what you really want?)…..the thought keeps coming to me that it would have been so nice if he could have taken that 15 minutes of fame and used it not to judge, criticize and condemn a system that we already knew was flawed but, instead, to have taken that brief period of attention and used it to declare to the world the awesome, fantastic, wonderful love of the Lamb of God who gave His blood not to sugarcoat our sins but rather to deliver us from those sins. David, refocus your attention to what is True and Lovely.



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D. Simon Parentis

posted October 25, 2006 at 7:24 pm


Mike said : “and we should give Glory to David’s reclaimation rather than critique it or even question it!” The issue here does not concern worship. It concerns conduct. If Kuo had issues with Christians and Bush, he could easily have done it in such a way that it was truly above reproach. Currently, he looks to be a small player in a rather large and ugly political game. That is why very many are being led to ridicule (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LANaUYuPfxA – here Kuo is party to using our Lord’s name in mockery) and few, if any, are being led to the message of Christ. I must reject your view that we ought not critique or even question Kuo.



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cadejo4

posted October 25, 2006 at 8:16 pm


Kuo is party to using our Lord’s name in mockery. I wonder what could be a greater mockery of Jesus than pretending that he opposes stem cell research, or that he would make a political ad. Jim Caviezel pretends to be Jesus (otherwise, why speak in Aramaic?) in an ad currently airing in Missouri. The Aramaic (l’bar nash b’nashak) is nonsensical, as it turns out (the son of man with a kiss). What’s next? Will Jesus do ads for the NRA, like Moses? How do you say “assault weapon” in Aramaic? How can anyone watch how “Christians” behave in American politics and not find it immensely funny, not to mention hypocritical? http://politicalvideos.blogspot.com/2006/10/jesus-responds-to-michael-j-fox-in-new.html



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pat

posted October 25, 2006 at 8:45 pm


Why is it that “Christians” as so many like to put us in quotations are the only group of people that it is politically correct to bash?



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cadejo4

posted October 25, 2006 at 9:02 pm


pat | 10.25.06 – 2:50 pm Speaking for myself, I use “Christians” (in quotation marks) to distinguish a very shrill group of hate-mongers from Christians (no quotation marks), who follow the teachings of Christ.



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Bubba

posted October 25, 2006 at 9:09 pm


Does cadejo4 believe that the teachings of Christ include a call for socialized medicine, gay clergymen, and abortion on demand?



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JT

posted October 25, 2006 at 9:18 pm


D. Simon – I agree with much of what you write and we’re probably on the same page theologically, but I don’t agree with the idea “The scriptures never calls believers to judge others as Christ is able to judge.” Not in the exact same way, of course, but we are called to exercise judgement. The Lord said, “Judge not, lest ye be judged” but he also said, “Do not judge by appearances, but judge with right judgement.” Jesus also said, “Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves. Ye shall know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?” If we are instructed to beware and to recognize the difference between grapes and thorns, figs and thistles, then obviously there is a critical function going on. Discerning of spirits is a spiritual gift. Jesus was not the only person who publicly criticized religious and political leaders for their ungodliness. The OT prophets did it routinely. John the Baptist is an example. Stephen was criticizing the Sanhedrin which led to his stoning (yes, he prayed for his persecutors; we’re to love even our enemies, even those we consider evil). The apostle Paul routinely criticized authority figures, especially those who claimed to speak for God but did not. I’m a Protestant so I believe in the priesthood of all believers and the indwelling of the Holy Spirit in each of us. The ability to challenge authority and speak uncomfortable truths was not reserved for a select few in Bible times. It still exists today. In fact, George W. Bush freely throws around the terms “evil” and “evil doers.” Obviously he feels free to judge others. We just have a difference of perspective about how godly Bush is. When you look at Kuo’s activities, you see “such a political play, dressed up in Jesus.” That’s what I see when I look at Bush, Rove, and Cheney. You have commented that Kuo has “behaved falsely” and “without honor,” so obviously you have judged him. I don’t know whether you’ve done it in love or not. That’s between you and God. I can’t judge motives, which I think is where we need to be careful when judging. I can evaluate Bush’s conduct using Scripture and the Spirit as guides; I can’t know his motives. I don’t see Kuo bringing Christ into disrepute among liberals. I see Bush doing that because he uses Christ as a mascot and wraps himself in Christianity while doing wrong. Un-Christlike conservatives–which in Bush’s case isn’t even an accurate label because he’s never been a conservative–taint Christ in the eyes of unbelievers. They serve as stumbling blocks. I’m sure this isn’t their intent but it’s a result. I assume they’re trying to glorify Christ through their lives. I assume Kuo is doing the same. I think it’s okay for us to critique the public efforts of brothers and sisters. We have every right to question and criticize the activities of Kuo because he’s a public figure to some extent. We have the same right, on a much larger scale, with Bush. As I see it, the light of Christ is shining much more through Kuo than Bush. I’m not going to write any more to you on the subject because too much haggling usually isn’t profitable. I have no animus toward you and, in fact, I agree with much of what you’ve written on this blog. We just see this particular matter differently.



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cadejo4

posted October 25, 2006 at 9:30 pm


Bubba | Homepage | 10.25.06 – 3:14 pm I have no idea what Christ might think of political issues, like how we pay for our health care, or what kind of gas mileage our cars get. I do believe he cared for the sick and downtrodden, even cured a few sick folks, as I recall from Sunday school. Here’s my simple test for whether an act is “Christian” or Christian. I substitute the word Christ-like for Christian. In other words, could I imagine Christ doing it? I don’t think we need Jim Caviezel pretending to be Jesus (and speaking bad Aramaic to boot) to tell us what to think about stem cell research. I believe you’ll admit it’s not only absurd, it’s un-Christ-like.



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Bubba

posted October 25, 2006 at 9:54 pm


If you’re accurate in describing what Caviezel did, I’ll agree that that wasn’t very Christ-like. But, then, neither is suggesting that he’s a shrill hate-monger for doing that. The tone of your objection is what prompted me to wonder aloud whether you believe Jesus would support the Democrat platform. It was probably an unnecessary comment on my part.



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cadejo4

posted October 25, 2006 at 10:07 pm


Thanks, Bubba. And, you’re right. “Shrill hate-monger” was overstated. We’ll never get anywhere if we don’t start listening to each other. I’m glad we could talk.



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D. Simon Parentis

posted October 25, 2006 at 11:25 pm


JT: Thank you for you well thought-out comments. It is true that we should exercise judgment, but that is a world away from judging others in the way Christ did. Christ judged and then condemned the Pharisees as children of the devil. He is able to do this because He knows precisely which persons are condemned and which aren t. We do not have this capability. So when we judge others in the way Christ did, harshly condeming them, we in a sense act as if we are God. We may exercise judgment against sinful behavior, and then seek to correct or avoid it ourselves. We may even condemn the behavior as sinful, and teach against it. But we ought not judge people as Christ judged them because it could very well be that our gentleness and kindness even amidst speaking the truth, is what will bring a wrong brother to repent. You just never know. We do not have Christ’s power, and neither do we have the power of the OT prophets, who spoke as direct representatives of God Himself. We are mere sinners, saved by Grace through faith. Paul never by stealth, released a book of hearsay to heathen publishers against other believers, during a hotly contested political campaign. He was an apostle of Christ who spoke openly against clear sin, not on some arguable issue such as whether someone failed to get a budget passed through Congress. If Kuo felt Bush was in sin, the scriptures are very clear on how such a thing should be handled. I don’t think Kuo followed Paul s example. I agree with you on Bush, and I base my assessment on the man s behavior and fruit. It is why I could never bring myself to vote for him in 2000. It is why I refused to vote for him in 2004. It is why I will not vote in November, and why I likely will never vote again in my lifetime. Still, when I look at Kuo s behavior, parading himself around on Comedy Central (for crying out loud), and assisting people who use our Lord as fodder for their jokes, I do not see godly behavior. There is nothing funny in any of this and Jesus would not have made fun of it neither would have Paul, or any other man of God. Again, I agree with you on Bush and Company, having judged their behavior. This is not about protecting Bush. It is about so-called Christians acting uncharitably toward one another. Paul would certainly not have sold a book about the evil deeds of other Christians. This is just so clearly a no-brainer that I fail to see a defense for it. I call Kuo s behavior false and without honor because the man failed to be straight up about his intensions. Do you really think there is even a hint of a chance that Bush will now consider himself in the wrong? Do you think Bush sees David Kuo s recent activities as an attempt to help or do you think they seem like an attempt at dirty politics? We all know the answer here. Even Kuo s supporters know the answer in their hearts. And if we all know it, you can bet Bush knows it. Kuo cannot stand innocently before those who he claims are in the wrong. Perhaps Bush does cynically exploit Christ. I think he does. But that still does not make what David Kuo has done any better than what Bush does. When Kuo publicly claims he wrote his book because he thought we needed to be told there is a difference between George W. Bush and God, do you really think he aims to help us or make us the brunt of a joke? Come on, friend. Surely you can see the problem here. Kuo claims to be a Christian, and yet he acts toward us no better than the heathen. It is cynical behavior, every bit as cynical as Bush s.



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lowly grunt

posted October 27, 2006 at 10:27 pm


Isn’t a story about being politically seduced a story about one’s walk of faith? It isn’t serving the political realm well, but it is his story.



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Dale

posted October 29, 2006 at 3:15 pm


Dr. Parentis, You say Kuo “presents salacious and unsubstantiated stories about others. He certainly would not have soiled His name by doing this shortly before an election, thereby making it seem He is just another spiteful knife player in a political game. ” Is this charge that this is a political maneuver not playing the very same game you say you abhor? The fact that you can (and even want to) hurl charges of “salacious and unsubstantiated” belies your entire premise, and places you squarely in that camp. While I am not convinced that Kuo is totally free of this fallacy either, you seem blind to your own participation in the very same games. Dale



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D. Simon Parentis

posted October 29, 2006 at 10:04 pm


Dale asks: Is this charge that this is a political maneuver not playing the very same game you say you abhor?No. It is not. I make no charge. I think Kuo s motives are suspect, that his behavior is not above reproach because it is mere he said/she said hearsay, with no hard evidence of truth behind it. It is offered with ridicule that implies evangelicals need Kuo to point out there is a difference between George Bush and God Almighty. It also comes at a time when it can do maximum political damage to the very people he criticizes. And, lastly, it is done for cold cash. None of these sorts of things apply to me. None are like anything Jesus has done or would do, based upon His prior example. They all apply to Kuo, and demonstrably so. Dale said: The fact that you can (and even want to) hurl charges of “salacious and unsubstantiated” belies your entire premise, and places you squarely in that camp.The definition of salacious I used was an indecent gesture or comment. The definition I used of the word unsubstantiated was unsupported by other evidence. When Kuo claims Karl Rove said I don t care. Just get me an F**king Faith-based thing , he offers us both a salacious and unsubstantiated comment. It may all be true. But without evidence, it still mere political gossip, and it does not become a believer. My position stands. Dale said: While I am not convinced that Kuo is totally free of this fallacy either, you seem blind to your own participation in the very same games.Perhaps, but I do not think so.



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Dennis Castle

posted October 29, 2006 at 10:27 pm


It’s a convenient argument that Dale makes, by saying that calling someone out for indecent comments makes you guilty of the same crime means that nobody can legitimately call someone out. Convenient, but not clever. I’ve noticed not one of Kuo’s adherents have addressed any (not one) point that his critics (in the classic sense) on any of these threads have made. All they’ve done is hurl invective back or said the equivalent of “O huh”. Leads me to believe that Kuo is a phony or a dupe, and those that follow him are the same.



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djchuang

posted October 31, 2006 at 12:55 pm


David, congratulations on your new book being published, and finding your faith fresh and anew, amidst quite a roller coaster ride inside the Beltway!



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Patti Blount

posted October 31, 2006 at 4:29 pm


I haven’t finished the book, so some might not think my comment is valid, but I’ll give it anyway. I bought the book because I was hoping it gave some validity to something that I believe about following Jesus and politics. The summary of it seemed to be suggestive of that. I honestly believe that the political system is set up by worldly values and ideologies exhalting man with power, fame, and money. If a Christian gets involved and thinks he can change the system, then that won’t happen. Eventually they will “bow the knee to Baal” or be stoked in the fire as the Hebrew boys were. I was hoping David had seen the truth of that in politics, sought God about his life, and got out completely. I had hoped that he would see that the “platoons” he wrote about were the place he needed to be, and that the Big Ship of man’s politics was only and illusion-not really something that was laying up treasures in heaven at all, but that men with their trophies already had their reward. One day the kingdoms of men will be replaced with the Kingdom of our God and Lord according to God’s revelation. Why not get on the boat now instead of wasting time and effort trying to impact that which will only try to rob you of your salvation through Jesus Christ? Like I said, David may have gotten out completely and is now personally denying himself and helping others and letting his light shine in this way. I hope so. I’ll find out when I complete the book. “My kingdom is not of this world. If it was my followers would be fighting for Me.” Jesus Christ. True then, true now.



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