Jesus Needs New PR

Jesus Needs New PR


Social media theology…. (on a bumper sticker)

Sent to me by Brad!



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Scot Kraemer

posted March 25, 2011 at 1:14 pm


I just saw this in our Christian book store. Took at pic of it and was going to send it to you. Funny.



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Tylor

posted March 25, 2011 at 1:16 pm


Wait, did they tape the sticker to their window?



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tam

posted March 25, 2011 at 1:17 pm


ugh.



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Rita

posted March 25, 2011 at 1:20 pm


That don’t make no sense.



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Sean R Reid

posted March 25, 2011 at 1:20 pm


General rule of thumb; if your theology/politics/etc… can be condensed to a 7″ x 3.5″ adhesive you *might* need to think a little harder.



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    Elemenope

    posted March 25, 2011 at 1:58 pm


    Funnily enough, my Facebook page reads thus:

    Political Views: Don’t fit on a bumper sticker
    Religious Views: Don’t fit in a book



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      Sean R Reid

      posted March 25, 2011 at 2:04 pm


      Yeah, I’ll plaster the heck out of my car with stickers from my alma mater (GO DAWGS!), favorite bands and a few brands. But reducing politics or faith to slogans it’s kind of missing the point.



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        LRA

        posted March 25, 2011 at 5:28 pm


        Not to mention just asking to get your car keyed by some idiot on the other side of the fence.



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          Dianna

          posted March 27, 2011 at 2:28 pm


          I have a bunch of really stupid stickers on my car that I put on there when I first got it 6 years ago. This conversation has reminded me that I really, really need to go scrape them off. :|



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Whitney Booth

posted March 25, 2011 at 1:20 pm


dictionary.com just confirmed my suspicions that “twitter” is a verb meaning “to utter a succession of small, tremulous sounds, as a bird.”

how does one begin to utter a succession of small bird like sounds with hell? COME ON.



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    Noelle

    posted March 26, 2011 at 1:02 pm


    I love my dictionary.com app. Helps me with Words With Friends



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Kevin Cole

posted March 25, 2011 at 1:23 pm


Whose fantasy was it that THIS would be seen as eye-catching, clever, thought-provoking or life-changing by the secular world? I suspect its intended audience will see it as having roughly the intelligence and awareness level of those silly Chick Publications tracts left in every public bathroom stall in America at one time or another… About as effective as buying 30 minutes of PM Drive on major market top 40 stations to play an episode of, say, “Unshackled” or the like.



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Lenk

posted March 25, 2011 at 1:36 pm


Seriously, we wonder why people hate Christians…this sucks…

how about “are you ready to face the book or lose your myspace in Hell?”…huh, huh…whaddya say? ;)



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    Elemenope

    posted March 25, 2011 at 1:58 pm


    Seriously, we wonder why people hate Christians…this sucks…

    While I agree it sucks, I think you’re aiming a little low on the “why the rest of the world doesn’t care much for Christians” explanation. Even if we summed together every irritating and flippant church marquee quote, bumper sticker, and chick tract, I think we might be missing some key elements.



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      Sean R Reid

      posted March 25, 2011 at 2:02 pm


      Yeah, there’s that whole slavery thing, more recently the entire anti-gay/homophobia movement, disdain for academia/science/critical thinking, patriarchy and, seemingly, rampant hypocrisy.

      Sadly, if people judge us [Christians] by our fruit then we’re pretty much rotten. A few bad puns on stickers really barely scrapes the surface of how poorly we’ve acted over the course of history.



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        Matt Svoboda

        posted March 25, 2011 at 2:15 pm


        Sean,

        Man, I am glad I dont know the Christians you know… People who are actually homophobes, disdain academia/science/critical thinking is probably less than 2% of Christians.

        I know people like to act as if it is the majority, but that isnt close to reality.

        Now, you have a point with the whole fruit thing, but the first paragraph is a really poor-broad swipe of Christians.

        In fact, “New Calvinism” is a major “trend” according to a lot of people and they would be the opposite of “disdain for academia/science/critical thinking.” I would also say 99% arent homophobes, but you might disagree with that. It is important to remember that just because someone believes the Bibles teaches that homosexuality is a sin doesnt mean they are homophobes.



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          Matthew Paul Turner

          posted March 25, 2011 at 2:25 pm


          2%? Really? That’s not my experience man… at all. I’m not saying it’s 70%… but it’s a lot higher than 2 I would imagine.



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          Deb94

          posted March 26, 2011 at 6:41 am


          I’ll agree with Matt S. that most of the Christians I know are not like that.

          MPT- most of the people who post on this blog are Christians. Do you think most of us are ignorant homophobes. What about the people in your church?



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          Elemenope

          posted March 26, 2011 at 7:55 am


          People tend to self-select into groups that share (or at least tolerate) their social beliefs. So, for example, if homophobia is a major element of one’s social views, he or she is not as likely to frequent a site whose commentariat is more respectful of sexual difference, and is concomitantly more likely to look for a site that would give their bigotry succor.

          One’s view of science follows a similar pattern; people who are knowledgeable about science tend to take a dim view of those who are willfully ignorant of it, and people who are willfully ignorant of it tend to be disdainful of those who possess it.

          This is why statistics (when properly and ethically used) tend to tell a different story than one’s personal experiences with their own peer group. A person who is lucky enough to have found an accepting Christian community that values scientific literacy may find the expression of homophobia and ignorance to be a deviation from their experienced norm, but it may nonetheless be statistically that they themselves (and their peer group) are the outliers of the broader group. Sadly, in this case, Christianity in the US has potent strains of homophobia and anti-science running right through its core, and if that doesn’t happen to be your experience then I can only say that you are enjoying a valuable minority experience.



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          Sean R Reid

          posted March 25, 2011 at 2:28 pm


          I agree with mpt. I’d wager it’s at least significantly more than 50%. Just look at the influence guys like Al Mohler, Ken Ham and John Piper have on the state of modern evangelicism.

          I’m not saying there isn’t a stereotype. But, like most stereotypes, it’s rooted in some very real truth.

          Check out the book unChristian by Kinnamon and Lyons. The suppositions by many are based in reality and data is staggering.



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          LRA

          posted March 25, 2011 at 5:35 pm


          Perhaps it depends on the part of the country you’re living in. In my part of the country, we are over-run with science-denying, “alternative lifestyle”- condemning, history-revisionist, misogynist jerks.



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          Elemenope

          posted March 25, 2011 at 5:36 pm


          LRA, for the sake of everything holy, FORSAKE TEXAS!

          It’s much better, well, everywhere else.



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          LRA

          posted March 25, 2011 at 5:42 pm


          Nooooo!!!! It’s my home!

          Besides, I think the difference is city versus country.

          City folks tend to be much less jerky.



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          Dianna

          posted March 27, 2011 at 2:31 pm


          I agree with this, especially in Texas. If I moved back there, the only place I think I could bear to live would be Austin. Seriously one of my favorite places on the planet.



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          LRA

          posted March 25, 2011 at 5:41 pm


          (Of course, there are lots of good people here, too. Just sayin’.)



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          Manda

          posted March 25, 2011 at 3:11 pm


          “In fact, “New Calvinism” is a major “trend” according to a lot of people and they would be the opposite of “disdain for academia/science/critical thinking.””

          You’re kidding, right? Speaking as a former “New Calvinist,” that’s not true (of the movement as a whole) by a long shot. I will grant that the movement puts a huge emphasis on books, reading, and studying. However, reading and studying do not equal academia/science/critical thinking. The movement allows NO room whatsoever for discussion, debate, critical thinking, or variation of opinion on a number of issues (gender roles, age of the earth, creation v. evolution, universalism, etc.). Try suggesting to a roomful of “New Calvinists” that the earth really is 4.6 billion years old, that women can be elders, that maybe, just *maybe* our preconceptions about heaven and hell just might be off, and then tell me that they’re open to science and critical thinking.

          Also, I second Sean’s recommendation of unChristian.



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          Dianna

          posted March 27, 2011 at 2:34 pm


          Wow, you’ve taken the words right out of my mouth!

          On Facebook yesterday, I wrote this:

          “Unfortunately, the American church can only handle a certain type of intellectualism – intellectualism that involves studying dates and facts and figures of the faith, without actually questioning the faith itself. It is a kind of study that reflects a confirmation bias – we are “allowed” to study those things which “affirm” the faith, but not that which might question it or go against the grain of the “orthodox” Christianity. I, for one, have never put up well with people telling me to just accept what I was told, and so my questions have always been outside the mainstream when it comes to these sorts of things (I, in fact, arrived at Bell’s same conclusion over a year ago in discussions with friends, and I’m mostly glad that I can now present the view in the course of critical thinking and discussion, rather than simply being spurned by fellow churchgoers).”

          This is true of John Piper, of Mark Driscoll, and Al Mohler. It is representative of the conservative movement as a whole – we’ll allow you to be intellectual, but only in prescribed, accepted ways. Siiiiigh.



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          Elemenope

          posted March 27, 2011 at 4:45 pm


          Somewhere towards the end of Tillich’s brilliant A History of Christian Thought he gets into a digression in the context of Kierkegaard, pietism, and Methodism about the question of whether a non-believer can properly be a theologian of Christianity. He himself doesn’t venture an opinion (though his later comments on Nietzsche indicate implicitly but firmly, I think, towards the affirmative), but it always struck me as an interesting question.

          It seems to me that if you only ever let the people who share in common a certain broad metaphysical perspective to talk about issues related to Christianity that some blind spots are going to inevitably creep into the discussion. Sometimes an outside critic with a fresh perspective can invigorate.

          There are shades of this within the instinct to cast out certain apparent heretics (like Mr. Bell) instead of grappling with their take head-on. I think an honest struggle with difficult ideas can only help, unless one thinks the ideas themselves are actually dangerous, or one’s own beliefs too fragile and difficult to defend to withstand such scrutiny.



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          Clark Frailey

          posted March 28, 2011 at 6:45 am


          @Manda – I was going to say about the same thing just less articulately. So thanks – I’ll add that the conversation options are terribly limited in my experience as well.



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      Noelle

      posted March 25, 2011 at 2:27 pm


      gonna have to agree. “Dumb bumper stickers” not a good enough reason to hate a religion.

      Why does anyone put any sticker on a car? Isn’t the adhesive hard to get off when you try to sell the car? I have the alma maters on the back window and the when to change the oil in the front top corner. Maybe I’ll break down and get a state park admission sticker for the front window (wait, does that make me a liberal or a conservative?) But on the car? no way



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April L.

posted March 25, 2011 at 1:46 pm


Hey–look at this pun I made about the eternal damnation and torment of people’s souls–isn’t it cute? Teehee…I’m so clever.

Barf. And that’s being nice.



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Matt Svoboda

posted March 25, 2011 at 2:16 pm


I hate it when I see bumper stickers like this. Such a poor example of biblical christianity.



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Matthew Lyon

posted March 25, 2011 at 2:28 pm


question: is it possible to be in hell yet love God?

sub question: how does one love god and not a attribute of god, or god for being x, y, z. (like grace, mercy, righteousness, etc.)



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    dafydd

    posted March 25, 2011 at 3:04 pm


    The answer won’t fit on a bumper sticker at any rate…



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JimPastorJim

posted March 26, 2011 at 4:58 pm


Wow… and all this time I thought when I die I’d have to be face-to-face with God. When did we switch over to a book?



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Charlie Chang

posted March 29, 2011 at 6:02 am


Plus, how does the sticker even make sense? Doesn’t everyone face the book. The impression of the sticker says it’s one or the other.

nicodemusatnite.com



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