Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Weekly Meanderings

posted by Scot McKnight
We’ve had grey, rainy weather, so I thought that
maybe some sunflowers would greet us this morning
for a little lift.

Sunflow.jpgLike Lake Wobegon, it’s been a busy but good week in cyberspace…


Colson’s piece on atheists who become believers: any comments?
David Opderbeck’s post on science and faith … at BNet … MUST read.
20 somethings helping 50somethings in the business world.
Read deep enough in this piece to see his question.
Sarah Pulliam Bailey‘s discussion of Hillary Clinton’s stance against the anti-defamation agenda and pro-freedom of speech point of view. (Congrats to Sarah for her coverage on this issue.)
Preaching.jpgA joke that appeals to more than one arena: A minister stood in front of his congregation and announced, “I have good news and bad news. The good news is we have enough money to pay for our new building program. The bad news is that it’s still in your pockets.”

I pay attention to and support organizations that track and interpret and judiciously speak against abortion, and I find Americans United for Life, led now by Charmaine Yoest, intelligent and fair-minded.
The future of newspapers? Will we see space where various voices can interact? The priesthood of all news readers and the citizen journalist. (HT: TJ)
Stressful jobs where the salaries are not good (ministers are among them).
Make sure you read Kavin Rowe.
Advice for bloggers: make it personal.
Advice for the married: know it’s not easy.
Collin Hansen keeps his finger on the Reformation issues at work in contemporary evangelicalism.
Did you see the Ten Most Expensive colleges? North Park, which is about half the tuition of these schools, has one of the best tuition packages in the USA for a private school.
News:
3. Women speaking about women: Mona Charen disagrees.
4. Instead of helping us understand the genuine plight of nuns, Maureen Dowd turns her column into a bully pulpit about the Pope.
5. Hispanics and the future of the American Catholic Church:  “Hispanics are the present and Hispanics are the future of the Catholic Church in the United States,” says Moreno Garcia. One-third of all Catholics in the United States are now Latinos thanks to immigration and higher fertility rates, according to the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. While St. Cecilia’s parish has relished the growth, elsewhere, the Latino population boom has rocked the pews.”
6. A.N. Wilson on the Catholics and Anglicans; a CNN piece on “emergent Jews.”
7. Bidenisms are updated weekly.
10. This is sad, this is true — and a MD friend of ours told us the same the other day.
Sports
Antoine Walker, broke. (HT: JC)


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Ted M. Gossard

posted October 31, 2009 at 8:48 am


On Scot’s time at Ashland Seminary this week; some pics, too.



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JRS

posted October 31, 2009 at 9:54 am


re: sad, true
It?s difficult for me to have sympathy for the business problems physicians face. Then again I don?t have sympathy for the problems other businesses face. All businesses have to adjust to the marketplace.
I suspect the real issue here is physician pay; that don?t want to work for less. But no business can charge more than people can pay for their goods and services. Physicians have enjoyed extremely high compensation for years. (High as compared to other workers and I know high is relative and a value judgment.)
Perhaps what we are seeing is a marketplace adjustment. Physicians should not complain about the situation and make it our (the customer?s) problem anymore than other businesses should expect their customers to solve business problems.
Why is it not appropriate to expect physicians to heal their own business problems?



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RJS

posted October 31, 2009 at 10:25 am


JRS,
I think that you are probably at least partially right … but there are other large expenses and malpractice insurance is, I think, one of the biggest, then there is office overhead which is also not insignificant. But perhaps I’ll stand corrected.



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RJS

posted October 31, 2009 at 10:35 am


Molly Aley’s piece is fantastic – her stuff is always worth reading. In this post she points out a problem that I have with some reformed doctrine – it is both too self-centered and too focused on the majesty of God. This is an interesting conundrum. I tend to go with more free will, the sovereignty of God, the importance of relationship, and the absence of micromanagement. We could have some interesting discussions here.
David Opderbeck’s piece is also worth a careful read. I am looking forward to part 2.
The three news items about women in the workplace are also worth comment — but I’ve work to do.



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RJS

posted October 31, 2009 at 11:14 am


Re :mic’s post (Read deep enough in this piece to see his question.)
Some 12-15 years ago my brother-in-law (pastor at the time of a small rural church (with a salary small enough to qualify for food stamps – relevant the the stressful jobs article)) led an effort to build a house for a disabled widow in his community. It worked – but was a great deal of work. (And he is not “emergent” or anything close…) This came about because he was convicted by the “care for widows and orphans” passages and saw real deep needs around.
We need more conviction to act – and we need structures in place to allow us to act. This is thought-provoking stuff.



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Darren King

posted October 31, 2009 at 1:17 pm


RJS, JRS, what’s next? SRJ, followed by SJR? Oh, how to keep it all straight!?



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Ann

posted October 31, 2009 at 2:22 pm


I thought the article about emergent Jews had a contemporary paraphrase things Jesus said, and which also parallels a lot of religious inaction, today.
“I could wake up tomorrow and say, ‘I don’t want to be Jewish.’ There would be no social, political or economic consequences,” said Shawn Landres, the 37-year-old co-founder of Jumpstart, a Los Angeles-area organization that pushes forward out-of-the-box ideas in the Jewish world. “It’s true for the first time in thousands of years that we can build the identities we want.”
If we can honestly say that there would be no consequences or ripples to a new personal decision “not to be Christian”, then something is amiss.



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Jjoe

posted October 31, 2009 at 3:36 pm


Doctors have went on strike before when the government didn’t do things to suit them. It didn’t matter.
My cousin is an oncologist. He lives in a $2 or 3 million house, pays $10,000+ a month in child support to his first wife and kids, and has opened 2 or 3 clinics.
He’s probably less able to go without a paycheck than anyone here.



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beckyr

posted October 31, 2009 at 6:11 pm


perhaps he could if he moved to a much less expensive house. There’s retirement for you right there – a million or so bucks.



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Diane

posted October 31, 2009 at 7:30 pm


Well I lost a message … just wanted to say I thought Woman and the Workforce and … was a great piece. Very thoughtful. I’d never thought of the Internet as exacerbating incivility to women, but I think it may. Of course, a woman who does more than faint on a sofa is going to be labeled a bitch, a ditz and ugly, but now it can be done more openly …
Otw, yes, the man could sell his 2-3 million dollar house and maybe could’ve tried harder to stay married. Hard to bleed to much for him…:)



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pds

posted November 1, 2009 at 7:55 am


David O’s post is worth a read. Even more worth a read is his critique of Judge Jones opinion here:
http://www.tgdarkly.com/blog/?p=294
These are my comments to David there:
We of course agree that ID has been misunderstood and misapplied in pop culture. It’s a little funny that you largely blame supportive believers for wrongly applying ID. Wouldn’t you agree that its opponents inside and outside the church are also to blame for misrepresenting it? Lots of urban myths are constantly peddled all over the web, including in the comments here.
You don’t get to a solution. Isn’t the key solution for everyone to represent ID accurately and promote reasonable applications?
The title is a little funny too. It seems hardly a “defense of Dover,” especially after your heavy duty attack on Judge Jones reasoning, which I think is more of a “must read.”



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cas

posted November 1, 2009 at 8:07 am


Scot,
I haven’t that much action on my neglected blog in some time, so thanks for the link love. As to Maureen Dowd, that was a screecher for sure. Blessings~



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