Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


The Whole Gospel

posted by xscot mcknight

Here’s a link to a podcast I gave on the whole gospel.
Here’s a link to a radio interview through Elmbrook Church with Mel Lawrenz. Click on the Leadership button.



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Diane

posted July 18, 2007 at 5:04 am


I listened to Scot’s radio interview with Elmhurst and a few points jumped out at me:
1. That we’ve moved from a guilt-based towards a shame-based society. Surprising, as it seems to me we’re often a shameless society (even in churches).
2. Pastors needs to be Christians first and leaders second. Agreed. It’s not about leading, it’s about following.
3. Concern over people being too busy. In Scot’s household, “evenings are sacred. When we’re home, we’re home.” I hear that but also struggle as I am joining a church with a huge emphasis on community building … which means going out at night … answers? How do churches start addressing the systemic issues that lead to people being too time-stressed for church community? Do churches need to preach and practice simplicity–living way under budget, as Scot stresses?
4. The Third World is the center of Christianity today. Agreed. Implications for us in First World?
5. Read the Bible daily. Aloud.



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Bill Baltrus

posted July 18, 2007 at 9:53 am


I received this link previously through a feed. This was a great speech/sermon about the future of the Church and reaching people.
I wanted to add as I listened that it isn’t just people between the ages of 20 and 30 who have been questioning the individual nature of the salvation theology or as Rob Bell so aptly put it “evacuation theology”
As a 39 year old I am drawn to the entire message that Jesus was about. I cried when you told some of your stories of people taking your class and slowly moving from the back of the class to committed followers of Jesus Christ. That is also my story. That is a lot of followers stories.
Jesus teaches that Love Wins, always!!!



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Diane

posted July 18, 2007 at 10:00 am


I agree that this is about people of all ages.



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Jeff Hyatt

posted July 18, 2007 at 11:18 am


Scot,
I heard you mention Bart Ehrman in your interview with Mel Lawrenz. I was given 4 books by Ehrman on the gnostics and the early church. Where does Ehrman fall on the spectrum of the gnostic acceptablility scale? Would you recommend that I read these books, or is it going to be an academic version of the Da Vinci code (which was an interesting novel, but loose on historical accuracy).
Thanks!
Jeff



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Scot McKnight

posted July 18, 2007 at 11:25 am


Jeff,
I’m not aware that Bart has written stuff on the gnostics other than in his surveys of the rise of orthodox faith. Do you mean those? He’s a good writer; he gets lots of the facts on the table; he leans (hard) against orthodoxy every time he puts pen to paper while trying to give the impression that he’s a “nothing but the facts, mam” kind of writer.



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Jeff Hyatt

posted July 18, 2007 at 1:00 pm


Scot,
The titles I have are “The Lost Gospel of Judas Iscariot,” “Lost Scriptures,” “Lost Christianites,” and “Peter, Paul & Mary Magdalene.” Perhaps I am in correct in my description of the focus being on the gnostic writings and such. Have you read any of these titles?
Jeff



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Jim Martin

posted July 18, 2007 at 2:27 pm


Scot,
I listened to your interview. I really enjoyed this. (Thanks for posting the link.) Perhaps it was due, in part, to the broad nature of some of the questions. (I always appreciate interviewers who ask very good questions.)
(By the way, Julie does a nice job in her comment above in summing up some of Scot’s comments)
Thanks



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Jim Martin

posted July 18, 2007 at 2:28 pm


Sorry, I was referring to Diane’s comment.



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Scot McKnight

posted July 18, 2007 at 11:33 pm


Jeff,
Yes, I’ve read these books but I’d not say they are focused on gnostics so much as focused on how proto-orthodoxy and orthodoxy suppressed alternative voices, which is one way of describing what happened. Another way is that they disagreed and knew the danger to the gospel by these proto-heretical and heretical ideas.



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posted July 29, 2014 at 10:06 pm


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