Jesus Creed

Jesus Creed


Resurrection, once more

posted by xscot mcknight

Three major books on the resurrection have come out in the last few years, and each of them takes us well beyond the age-old debates and evidence that are continually re-hashed and offered up as boilerplate apologetics. N.T. Wright’s The Resurrection of the Son of God, Alan Segal’s Life after Death, and now the extensively-documented, wide-ranging, and always provocative Resurrecting Jesus by Dale Allison.
We need a conference on the resurrection to put all this together.



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Loren Rosson

posted August 31, 2005 at 9:12 am


Scot,
To your list of Wright, Segal, and Allison, I would add Ludemann (to balance out Wright). Wright’s Resurrection of the Son of God, Ludemann’s Resurrection of Christ, and Allison’s Resurrecting Jesus add up to a nice trilogy on the subject.



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Scot McKnight

posted August 31, 2005 at 9:20 am


I agree for a fair and balanced discussion, but Lueddemann is now 11 years old.



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Pete Phillips

posted August 31, 2005 at 9:24 am


And, of course, this is a subject which lies within the sphere of Esler’s NT Theology book, Communion and Community. He focusses on Resurrection in the second half of the book. He attempts to tackle Tom Wright on port-mortem existence. I think he fails.
Pete



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Loren Rosson

posted August 31, 2005 at 9:32 am


Scot — Ludemann’s Resurrection of Christ was published in 2004. On the Crosstalk mailing list we had an online seminar with him about this book not long ago.
Pete — I think Esler makes a more than fair case against Wright, though far from conclusive.



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John Byron

posted August 31, 2005 at 9:48 am


Scot,
I agree on the need for a conference. What would it take for us to get these three together?



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TheBlueRaja

posted August 31, 2005 at 12:48 pm


I think Idaho would be the perfect place to host such a conference. We could end the weekend with a tractor pull.



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Horace Jeffery Hodges

posted August 31, 2005 at 3:10 pm


Let’s have the conference in Seoul. That way, I can attend.
Jeffery Hodges
* * *



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John Frye

posted August 31, 2005 at 3:10 pm


Blue Raja, would the conference be in metropolitan Idaho?



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Scot McKnight

posted August 31, 2005 at 5:25 pm


If you have someone who has about 10-15,000 dollars, this could be done at several locations. I’m not much for administrating this sort of thing, but I’d be one who was willing to help.



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Mark

posted August 31, 2005 at 10:59 pm


I think this is a good idea. I taught a course in Christology last year and was struck by the lack of textbook quality works on the resurrection, although there are a bunch of good ones on the death and incarnation. I ended up using selected articles from “The Resurrection: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Resurrection of Jesus,” edited by Stephen T. Davis. But it’s already dated in light of these newer works.



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TheBLueRajah

posted September 1, 2005 at 1:28 pm


Of course it is, John – we don’t put on events of such sophistication in RURAL areas . . .



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Steven Carr

posted May 29, 2006 at 3:34 am


I wonder if Allison ever finds space to quote in full ‘the last Adam became a life-giving spirit’? Wright uses more than 700 pages and never once quotes that in full.
I also wonder if Allison finds space to ever quote 1 Peter saying ‘All flesh is grass.’? Wright never does.
Perhaps we can judge whether a work is a truly scholarly work on the early Christians belief in the resurrection of the flesh , by seeing it it quotes early Christians choosing ‘flesh’ as the perfect metaphor for something transient, perishable and mortal, and spirit as the ideal way to describe what is eternal?



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Steven Carr

posted May 29, 2006 at 3:36 am


I wonder if Allison ever finds space to quote in full ‘the last Adam became a life-giving spirit’? Wright uses more than 700 pages and never once quotes that in full.
I also wonder if Allison finds space to ever quote 1 Peter saying ‘All flesh is grass.’? Wright never does.
Perhaps we can judge whether a work is a truly scholarly work on the early Christians belief in the resurrection of the flesh , by seeing if it quotes early Christians choosing ‘flesh’ as the perfect metaphor for something transient, perishable and mortal, and spirit as the ideal way to describe what is eternal?



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