Advertisement

Deepak Chopra and Intent

Deepak Chopra and Intent

A Book That Peers into Eternity

An article written for the Washington Post On Faith section.
There’s a single book that I reread every year: “I Am That” by Nisargadatta Maharaj (1897-1981). The title is a quotation. In India the goal of enlightenment is to see reality as a whole. When all illusion has fallen away, one looks around and can say, with complete confidence, “I am That, you are That, and all this is That.”
What does the word “That” mean? It means the essence of existence. What does the essence of existence mean? There is no adequate definition, and therefore a huge mystification has built up around “That.” Nisargadatta
Maharaj, whose name is almost totally unknown in the West, comes as close as possible to putting pure essence into words. In my experience, every reader who has discovered his book considers it magical, and those of us who treasure it feel that it opens a window into eternity, in part because of what Nisargatta says, but much more because of its astonishing ability to change the reader.
The Wikipedia article on Nisargadatta informs us that the 1973 publication of “I Am That” made him world famous. That’s a stretch, but the book did rise to the top of required reading in modern Indian spirituality.
The text is made up entirely of transcripts of informal talks given above the tiny shop that Nisargadatta ran in Mumbai. He himself couldn’t write, being an uneducated farm boy who moved to the big city. He reached
enlightenment in a remarkable way. As he walked behind his plow in his native village, he reminded himself that he was the essence of Being, not a person with human limitations. Or to be precise, his guru told him “You are
That.”
There’s a single book that I reread every year: “I Am That” by Nisargadatta Maharaj (1897-1981). The title is a quotation. In India the goal of enlightenment is to see reality as a whole. When all illusion has fallen away, one looks around and can say, with complete confidence, “I am That, you are That, and all this is That.”
It is believed in India that the liberated state, or Moksha, takes hundreds of lifetimes to attain. One supposes, then, that this illiterate farm boy must have prepared a long time for the breakthrough into enlightenment. So
far as we know he never practiced spiritual disciplines. As he put it, his guru told him “You are That,” and Nisargadatta believed him.
I won’t give away what Nisargadatta talks about in this book — he is never trivial, however. One is immediately transported into his extraordinary presence. Just as reading one scene of Hamlet is enough to convince you
that Shakespeare is a great writer, reading five pages of Nisargadatta convinces you (if you can be convinced at all) that this untutored man is in touch with deepest wisdom — he breathes an air more rarefied than ours. He
possesses a quality we struggle to express in English– absolute knowingness. As simply as Nisargadatta speaks — simple enough to be understood by a ten-year-old — the effect upon the reader is powerful
enough to cause deep sympathy and trust, and in some readers there is actual transformation. Every time I reread “I Am That,” I close the book convinced that the world would change entirely if everyone in it took
Nisaargadatta’s wisdom to heart.
www.intentblog.com
www.deepakchopra.com
http://newsweek.washingtonpost.com/onfaith/deepak_chopra/

Advertisement
Comments Post the First Comment »
post a comment

Post a Comment

By submitting these comments, I agree to the beliefnet.com terms of service, rules of conduct and privacy policy (the "agreements"). I understand and agree that any content I post is licensed to beliefnet.com and may be used by beliefnet.com in accordance with the agreements.



Previous Posts

Is Physics the Next Guru?
The worldview of modern physics teases us with spiritual suggestions like the discovery—premature it seems—of the “God particle.” That nickname embarrasses some in the field, but ever since Fritjof Capra’s book The Tao of Physics, the ...

posted 11:48:13am Apr. 20, 2015 | read full post »

Synchronicity, Evolution, and Your Genes (Part 3)
  By Deepak Chopra, MD, and Jordan Flesher, MA Psychology   Two views of the universe have been contending with each other to explain why human beings exist. The first view holds that human beings are not special in any way. ...

posted 10:38:46am Apr. 13, 2015 | read full post »

Synchronicity, Evolution, and Your Genes (Part 2)
Everyone has had a meaningful coincidence happen to them--the classic example is thinking of someone's name and the next minute that person telephones, or seeing an unusual word in your mind's eye and then running across that word the next time ...

posted 12:03:58am Apr. 06, 2015 | read full post »

Synchronicity, Evolution, and Your Genes (Part 1)
By Deepak Chopra, MD, and Jordan Flesher, BA Psychology   Over the past decade, the hunt for genetic connections with behavior as intensified. For any experience, there must be a physical activity in the brain—otherwise, the ...

posted 10:56:38am Mar. 30, 2015 | read full post »

The Best Way to Get Rid of Evil
    By Deepak Chopra, MD.   The best way to get rid of evil is to change our ideas about it. The two concepts about evil that do nothing to end it are, first, the concept of cosmic evil embodied by Satan, and second, ...

posted 11:07:42am Mar. 23, 2015 | read full post »

Advertisement


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.