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Deepak Chopra and Intent

Deepak Chopra and Intent

Sowing Seeds of Gratitude to Cultivate Wellbeing

posted by Admin

Paul J. Mills, Tiffany Barsotti, Meredith A. Pung, Kathleen L. Wilson,

Laura Redwine, and Deepak Chopra

 

Gratitude, along with love, compassion, empathy, joy, forgiveness, and self-knowledge, is a vital attribute of our wellbeing. While there are many definitions of gratitude, at its foundation, gratitude is a healing, life-affirming, and uplifting human experience that shifts us from focusing on the negative to appreciating what is positive in our lives. Gratitude provides us with a more intimate connection to ourselves and the world around us. In the feeling of gratitude, the spiritual is experienced.

For those who are ill, feelings of gratitude and awe may facilitate perceptions and cognitions that go beyond the focus of their illness, and include positive aspects of one’s personal and interpersonal reality in the face of disease. Such beneficial associations with gratitude have accelerated scientific interest in and research on gratitude and wellbeing. The number of publications on gratitude appearing in the biomedical literature in 5-year increments since 1960-1965 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) shows almost no publications until 1996-2000 with about 20 studies. That number doubled from 2001-2005. From 2006-2010 publications jumped to 150, and from 2011 to the present over 275 studies on gratitude have been published.

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Much of this growth of scientific interest in gratitude can be traced to the early pioneering gratitude research of psychologists Robert Emmons and Michael McCullough. In general, studies find that the frequency with which one experiences the feeling of gratitude, as well as the depth of emotion when experiencing it, are linked to improvements in perceived social support as well as reduced stress and depression. Among groups seeking to support this work, the Greater Good Science Center (Berkeley, CA), in collaboration with the Templeton Foundation (West Conshohocken, PA), has been a strong advocate of advancing the science of gratitude and expanding that science into diverse areas of human health and wellbeing.

One area of research that has helped to elucidate our understanding of the science of gratitude and wellbeing is behavioral cardiology.  The field of behavioral cardiology augments traditional cardiology by examining psychosocial factors as they relate to cardiac health.  Traditionally, behavioral cardiologists focused more on traits such as anger expression and hostility. Cardiologists Friedman and Rosenman, who first described the Type A behavior pattern in the late 1950s, conducted some of the earliest and most systematic scientific work in this area. The Type A behavior pattern is characterized by a set of personality traits including free floating hostility, competitiveness and time urgency; with more of these traits being associated with worse disease. Research eventually suggested that it is anger coping styles, and not competitiveness and time urgency, that are the more pathogenic aspects of the behavior pattern, linking them to morbidity and mortality.

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In contrast to these types of adverse influences of relatively negative psychological traits, studies of positive psychological attributes indicate potential beneficial effects on quality of life and physical health in cardiac disease. In several clinical populations, spirituality and/or religious wellness are often associated with better mental and physical health. In this literature, spiritual wellbeing is seen as distinct from religiousness. In individuals with symptomatic heart failure, for example, there is a positive relationship between spiritual wellbeing and better physical and mental wellbeing. These are important observations because heart failure is a major US public health concern affecting over 6 million Americans with rates expected to nearly triple over the next few decades as the population ages. Heart failure is the end stage of most cardiac anomalies, with the annual number of hospitalizations exceeding 1 million and US direct costs exceeding $40 billion/year. There is increasing recognition of the value of embracing multidisciplinary therapeutic approaches in heart failure (as well as other chronic illnesses) that include enhancing spirituality and positive psychological traits as part of more routine psychosocial support. Early studies report reduced depressive symptoms and better health-related outcomes among individuals with cardiovascular disease following spirituality-based interventions that include guided imagery, meditation, journaling, and nature-based activities.

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A recent collaboration between the UC San Diego Center of Excellence for Research and Training in Integrative Health and the Chopra Foundation examined associations between gratitude and wellbeing in men and women with asymptomatic heart failure. We found that those patients with more dispositional or trait gratitude also slept better, were less depressed, had less fatigue, had more self-confidence to take care of themselves, and had less systemic inflammation.  We also took the opportunity in this study to examine the role that gratitude might have in the known beneficial effects of spirituality on wellbeing. We conducted what is called a mediation analysis (in statistics, a mediation model attempts to explain the underlying process by which one variable exerts its effect on another (in this case how spirituality might lead to enhanced wellbeing) by considering the effect of a third variable; in this case gratitude).  We found that gratitude fully or partially accounted for the beneficial effects of spiritual wellbeing on sleep quality, mood, confidence in self-care, and fatigue. That is, in this group of patients, the observed relationships between spiritual wellbeing and better mood and sleep quality were due to the contributions of gratitude as a fundamental component of spiritual wellbeing. Together, the findings from this study are confirmatory of gratitude’s relationships with better mental and physical wellbeing in cardiovascular disease.

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Beyond observational studies relating trait gratitude to an array of measures of wellbeing, further work in the form of gratitude intervention studies has begun to demonstrate that when we are intentional with our gratitude and actually create time and space to regularly practice gratitude, other areas of wellbeing improve as well.  Though researchers consider gratitude to be a trait, this does not imply that it exists solely as a genetic setpoint that cannot be changed. Instead, engaging in intentional gratitude practices are associated with a variety of benefits and may, in fact, boost the frequency, depth, and range of circumstances for which we are grateful. Practices that actively cultivate a more conscious experience of gratitude take us beyond reciprocal gratitude, and greatly enrich our lives and our sense of connection to the life around us.  A recent gratitude intervention study, for example, found that when health care workers kept a work-related gratitude diary they had a decline in stress and depressive symptoms. As anthropologist and author of the book Living in Gratitude: A Journey That Will Change Your Life, Angeles Arrien wrote ‘Through conscious and sustained practice over a period of time, we can discover again how gratitude and all its related qualities—thankfulness, appreciation, compassion, generosity, grace, and so many other positive states—can become integrated and embodied in our lives’.  When gratitude is present in our awareness, everything changes, we can find ourselves transformed.

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There are numerous practices to cultivate gratitude. At the Chopra Center for Wellbeing in Carlsbad CA., “What am I grateful for?” is one of four key questions that practitioners pose to themselves prior to entering into meditation. Such practices of gratitude bring awareness to and appreciation of the positive features within and around us, helping us to embrace life as it is with all of its imperfections.  Other practices to consciously cultivate a grateful life include journaling, counting blessings, savoring positive moments, and behavioral expressions of gratitude such as thank you notes, to name a few. By cultivating gratitude, we cultivate wellbeing.

For readers interested in learning about current biomedical studies examining gratitude and wellbeing in different states of illness, including cardiovascular disease, a description of these studies can be found at the US National Institutes of Health ClinicalTrials.Gov website (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/home) by searching the word ‘gratitude’. ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world.

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 Additional Reading

 

Algoe SB, Haidt J, Gable SL. Beyond Reciprocity: Gratitude and Relationships in Everyday Life. Emotion, 8:425-9, 2008

Cheng ST, Tsui PK, Lam JH. Improving mental health in health care practitioners: randomized controlled trial of a gratitude intervention. J Consult Clin Psychol, 83:177-86, 2015

Dubois, C. M., Beach, S. R., Kashdan, T. B., Nyer, M. B., Park, E. R., Celano, C. M., & Huffman, J. C. Positive psychological attributes and cardiac outcomes: associations, mechanisms, and interventions. Psychosomatics, 53, 303-318, 2012

Mills P.J., Redwine L., Wilson K., Pung M.A., Chinh K., Greenberg B.H., Lunde O., Maisel A., Raisinghani A., Wood A., Chopra D. The Role of Gratitude in Spiritual Wellbeing in Asymptomatic Heart Failure Patients. Spirituality in Clinical Practice 2, 5-17, 2015

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Mccullough, M. E., Emmons, R. A., & Tsang, J. A. The grateful disposition: A conceptual and empirical topography. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82, 112–127, 2002

Sacco, S. J., Park, C. L., Suresh, D. P., & Bliss, D. Living with heart failure: psychosocial resources, meaning, gratitude and well-being. Heart Lung, 43, 213-218, 2014

Wood, A.M, Tarrier, N. Positive Clinical Psychology: a new vision and strategy for integrated research and practice. Clinical Psychological Reviews, 30, 819-29, 2010

 

 Authors

 Paul J. Mills, PhD, Professor of Family Medicine and Public Health, and Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego; Director of Research at the Chopra Foundation

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Tiffany Barsotti, MTh, C.Ht, Medical Intuitive, Counselor and Researcher at Heal and Thrive in Encinitas CA

Meredith Pung, PhD, Clinical Research Coordinator, University of California, San Diego

Kathleen L. Wilson, MS, Clinical Research Coordinator, University of California, San Diego

Laura Redwine, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego

Deepak Chopra, MD, Co-Founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, Carlsbad, CA; Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego

 

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Which Universe Do You Want to Live In? It’s Your Choice

posted by Admin

By Deepak Chopra, MD, and Menas Kafatos, PhD

 

The night sky that you can view from your back yard is roughly the same, given a few changes in the positions of stars, as the night sky Galileo turned his telescope on to. But visual similarity is misleading. There have been half a dozen different universes conceived of in the human mind. As each conception changes, so does reality. We like to think that science steadily marches forward, but with each new universe something is lost and something is gained. Here we take the term universe to imply a world view, rather than just the large-scale universe explored with telescopes and deep space probes.

 

Here’s a sketch of how this has worked:

 

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  1. The Divine Universe: The first universe was created by God or the gods.
  2. The Classical Universe: The second universe, sometimes known as the clockwork universe, perceived to work in a perfect mechanism, was created and ruled by fixed laws of nature knowable through human reason and by applying the mathematical equations of classical physics.
  3. The Relativistic Universe – The third universe, based on Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity, preserved the unity of the classical universe but showed that a new spacetime geometry was necessary. Its consequence was a dynamical, expanding universe.
  4. The Quantum Universe: The third universe was still ruled by laws of nature, but in place of constants, a large element of randomness and probability was introduced. Einstein’s attempt to preserve a unified scheme akin to the classical universe was rejected, mostly because of laboratory evidence rather than philosophical principles.

 

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Because no one to-date has been able to make the relativistic universe mesh with the quantum universe, an enormous mathematical guessing game began and still continues.  There are many exotic universes that could be described, according to one’s belief in cosmological and particle theories such as steady state, eternal inflation, superstring, Standard Model, many worlds, the multiverse, M theory, and so on. All are mathematical in nature. They do not describe how reality actually works, although there’s always the optimistic hope that theory and reality may match. Taken as a group, these theories all belong to the present universe, which is as follows:

 

  1. The Uncertain Universe, which is based on many equations, some critical observations, and huge expenditures of time and money in an attempt to extract new data about the fabric of nature.

 

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Uncertainty isn’t a comfortable state to live with, so two other universes have recently cropped up.

 

  1. The Conscious Universe, which is based on the notion that random events may not be enough to explain the exquisite fine tuning of the laws of nature and, more importantly, the rise of life on Earth.

 

  1. The Human Universe, which is based on the undeniable fact that any universe must be based on the human mind’s ability to think about reality. If all knowledge is rooted in human consciousness, perhaps we are viewing not the real universe but a selective one based on the limitations of the brain.

 

The gains and losses that attend each universe or world view are well known. If you shift from the divine universe to the classical universe, you lose God but you gain predictable, exact mechanisms for natural phenomena. If you shift from the classical universe to the relativistic universe, you lose the absolute constancy of time and space but gain a dynamic way to explain how distant objects in motion seemingly recede from us up to the speed of light. For some people, including scientists, there’s a refusal to accept the losses. People who believe that God created the world in seven days are willing to sacrifice science because they don’t want to lose God. Chemists, whose work is largely confined to the classical world, willingly turn their backs on quantum insights, finding them interesting but largely not utilitarian.

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This leaves us in a landscape where choices are being made for arbitrary reasons. The many camps that vie for dominance in the Uncertain Universe have spent decades bouncing from one fad to the next, and although a so-called standard model of the cosmos exists, the basic interpretation of quantum mechanics, a hundred years after its formulation, is hotly argued over.

 

What needs to happen is a decisive break based on validated findings that clear away the arbitrary choices and faddishness that has made the Uncertain Universe such a muddle. This is what the Conscious Universe attempts to do, and at a more speculative level, the Human Universe. Actually, in a sense, the Human Universe is an aspect of the Conscious Universe, referring back to us as observers. At the very least each of us needs to be aware of the lay of the land. The basic notion taught in school holds that science marches in a straight line, thus insuring steady progress in any field of knowledge. That model is only partially true. Science also contains politics, fads, false starts, shaky assumptions, and confusion about basic principles that have become outmoded over time. Remember this the next time you are tempted to pick the universe you live in. There are a lot more choices than you may imagine. Ultimately this is good, because it opens the door to ponder the deep questions of existence, which are far more important than contending theories among a handful of scientific elites..

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DEEPAK CHOPRA MD, FACP, founder of The Chopra Foundation and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, is a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine and personal transformation, and is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.

Chopra is the author of more than 80 books translated into over 43 languages, including numerous New York Times bestsellers. TIME magazine has described Dr. Chopra as “one of the top 100 heroes and icons of the century.” The World Post and The Huffington Post global internet survey ranked Dr. Chopra #40 influential thinker in the world and #1 in Medicine. Coming soon: Super Genes (November 10, 2015, Penguin Harmony)

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MENAS C. KAFATOS Ph.D. is the Fletcher Jones Endowed Professor of Computational Physics, at Chapman University. He is a quantum physicist, cosmologist, and climate change researcher and works extensively on consciousness. He holds seminars and workshops for individuals and corporations on the natural laws that apply everywhere for well-being and success. His doctoral thesis advisor was the renowned M.I.T. professor Philip Morrison who studied under J. Robert Oppenheimer. He has authored 300+ articles, is author or editor of 15 books, including “The Conscious Universe” (Springer) with Robert Nadeau, and is co-author with Deepak Chopra of the forthcoming book, “The Creative Cosmos” (Harmony). You can learn more at http://www.menaskafatos.com and follow him on Facebook: www.facebook.com/menas.kafatos Twitter:@mckafatos and LinkedIn: Menas

 

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Meditation and the Spiritual Life of Children

posted by Admin

By Deepak Chopra, MD

When they become parents, many people wonder how to impart spiritual values to their children. The traditional model of sending them to Sunday school is one alternative; another is to draw the entire family into the personal spirituality of the parents, as more people turn away from organized religion to carve their own path. Children grow up to reflect how they are raised, which makes this an important issue.

 

To begin with, a child’s spiritual life should be age appropriate. A very young child’s brain hasn’t matured enough to absorb adult beliefs, and the overall development of every child is unique. Before age ten or so, I feel that spiritual parenting will have the most lasting effect if it builds a foundation in the self rather than focusing on principles. As a practical matter, every young child should feel that

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  • They are loved and lovable.
  • They are worthwhile in their parents’ eyes.
  • Being a good person comes from within.
  • Happiness and fulfillment are natural.

At this stage, the role of caretaker is all-important. Young children have their own predispositions that show up early on. A child starts to show personality traits very soon in life. Yet no matter how different they are, children need to feel worthy and loved.

 

The next phase of spiritual parenting is about values. Child psychology studies have shown that babies as early as six months old want to help their mothers, and even infants react positively when they see good behavior and shy away from bad behavior in others. So there is reason to feel that children have a moral nature.

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With that in mind, parents should develop a child’s inner values all the time while keeping in mind that grasping these values mentally, in terms of abstract ideas, isn’t going to happen early on. Instead, children internalize what they see and how they are treated. Saying “Be nice to your little brother” makes an impression the first time, with decreasing meaning as it gets repeated. But seeing parents who are fair and kind literally trains a child’s brain in that direction.

 

Lifelong values are not instilled through negative lessons and punishment. What a child takes away from these experiences is guilt, shame, and resentment. The same is true if parents instill fear and doubt by telling children such things as “Life is unfair,” “If you don’t look out for number one, no one else will,” and “If you want anything in this world, you have to fight for it.” Remember, what we all grow up remembering most vividly from our childhood is the emotional tone of family life. Children raised in a tense, stressful, or difficult home environment will adapt to it, because it’s in their nature to adapt, but that doesn’t mean that they will emerge undamaged.

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And now to the question of meditation and the inner life. Meditation can add to a sense of a child’s self-worth and even a sense of power, because it’s an activity that belongs just to them. The childhood brain is a factor here. Where it has been shown that introducing meditation in the schools leads to behavioral improvements in older ages (middle school and later), younger ages benefit, I feel, when meditation fulfills the following criteria:

  • It feels like fun.
  • The child expresses enjoyment.
  • Nothing is forced or turned into a chore.
  • The whole family participates.

Looking back, many adults feel turned off by the religious lessons their parents tried to impart because of an air of strict morality or pressure to be good.  The beauty of meditation is that everything comes from within, but “within” means different things at different ages.

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Starting at age six or seven—each parent will have to play this by ear—the parents can sit down to meditate with a child, using a simple technique: Sit quietly with eyes closed and follow the breath. Don’t ask the child to meditate for more than 5 to 10 minutes. Make it clear that if they stop enjoying it, they are free to get up and go play. But the parents should continue their own meditation for the usual time.

 

By being invited in and yet given the freedom to choose, a child will associate meditation with something they have control over. The worst lesson is to feel that meditation is a way for them to be controlled, forced to settle down and “be good.” In other words, don’t make meditation the equivalent of sitting in the corner or taking time out. A child who is running around or acting out needs a nap, a talking to, or some other corrective. Meditation isn’t one of them.

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The greatest benefit of meditation comes when a child is able to notice actual changes themselves. They feel calmer, more centered, less troubled, less tempted to act out. A parent can coax these realizations, but gently, by pointing out a positive change. But be careful not to intrude. Everyone’s inner life is private, no matter how young they are. Taking note of inner changes probably won’t happen consistently until age twelve or later, and the attraction of major changes probably won’t happen until mid to late adolescence, at a time when discovering who they are comes naturally to teenagers.

 

I hope these points are useful, but the most important one became the theme of a book I wrote, The Seven Spiritual Laws of Parenting, which is this: If you want your child to lead a fulfilled and successful life, the best route is through spiritual parenting. The child learns the value of their own inner world, and as the years pass, this value increases until the realization dawns that all of existence originates “in here,” at the level of the soul.

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DEEPAK CHOPRA MD, FACP, founder of The Chopra Foundation and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, is a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine and personal transformation, and is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Chopra is the author of more than 80 books translated into over 43 languages, including numerous New York Times bestsellers. www.deepakchopra.com

Check out Let My Light Shine Bright, a new mix-and-match meditation app for kids, ages 8-12

 

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Do We Really Know What’s Real? The Most Optimistic Answer Is Maybe

posted by Admin

By Deepak Chopra, MD, and Menas Kafatos, PhD

 

For a very long time, if you wanted to know if something is real or not, the go-to people have been scientists. The rise of rationality over superstition is considered the single greatest achievement of the past three or four centuries. So it’s startling news–as we discussed in the last post–that physics has arrived at a reality crisis. Three great unsolved mysteries remain, and they are the same riddles asked by ancient Greek philosophers: What is the universe made of? Where did the universe come from? How do we know what’s real?

 

It’s fascinating to observe how working scientists approach these questions. The vast majority pay no attention to them, because a scientist’s everyday work, including the work of physicists, is about collecting data, running experiments, and making calculations from known theories, and once in a while formulating new theories. The Big Questions which are left to theorists, are usually bypassed in the everyday lives of scientists. But as we discussed last time, science has to test every theory to see if it matches empirical reality.  Galileo could calculate on paper that two objects, when dropped from a height, would hit the ground at the same time, despite the age-old assumption that a cannonball, being much heavier than a lead fishing weight, would hit the ground first, as Aristotle believed. To prove that his calculations were correct, Galileo offered empirical proof, and physics took a huge counter-intuitive step forward.

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Most physicists are still deeply wedded to empirical proof, and because massive particle accelerators and deep-space telescopes continue to bring back better and better data, delving deeper into the fabric of Nature, there’s a camp we can label “we’re almost there.” If you belong to this camp, you view the future as an unstoppable march to progress; the same march science has been on for centuries. There is no reason to believe that the Big Questions won’t be answered as long as we’re patient enough. But this confident attitude has run into three major obstacles.

  1. Most of the universe is sub-empirical, which means that the fundamental fields that make up the physical universe are invisible, probably infinite in expanse, and out of direct reach to experimenters. The evidence for their existence is through isolated experiments that “excite the field” into activity.
  2. As much as two-thirds of observable creation is conjectured to be composed of dark matter and dark energy, which are so alien to ordinary matter and energy that even to detect a particle of dark matter is a laborious enterprise, not yet successfully completed. Being far more exotic, dark energy baffles even the most sophisticated mathematical models.
  3. The Standard Model of the cosmos, although widely accepted, is filled with holes and unproven assumptions. Its core concepts, such as quantum field theoretical concepts, are constantly being added to and patched together. Quantum field theories like quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics are elegant and work well within their own domains. But do they truly lead to a unified view of the cosmos as proponents of the Standard Model believe?

 

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Knowing just this much, you can see why another camp in physics is saying “We haven’t even begun yet.”  When told that they are anti-science–a frequent slur usually made by those too afraid to “abandon ship” or too blind to notice that the ship is tilting–or that current assumptions work very well, the “We haven’t even begun yet” camp points to a decades-long roadblock in unifying the four fundamental forces in Nature (gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear force). A Theory of Almost Everything has been left hanging, with the Holy Grail, the Theory of Everything, perpetually out of reach. This halt dates back almost a century, when it was first realized that Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity, which explains gravity, spacetime, and the behavior of large objects, is irreconcilable with quantum mechanics, which explains the other three forces and the behavior of very small objects.

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Besides the three Big Questions that reinforce a belief that we haven’t even begun to get at the deepest realms of Nature, there are other problems that remain up in the air, such as

–How did the initial chaos in the first instant of the Big Bang turn into orderliness?

— Why are the constants of nature so fine-tuned that the tiniest alteration in any one of them would have prohibited the universe from forming as we see it and to  us not even  being here to ponder these questions?

— How can we believe in popular theories like superstrings and the multiverse when there is no way to verify them and never will be, since they exist outside spacetime?

— When the so-called God particle (the Higgs boson) was discovered, it supposedly explained how particles of matter acquired mass. But how do we know this is true? How do we know what is “fundamental” in quantum field theory? Nineteenth century philosopher Ernst Mach held the view that inertial mass of nearby objects is created by the entire distribution of matter in the universe.

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— When advanced concepts like supergravity and superstrings theory posit the existence of eleven dimensions or more, what does that really signify except numbers on a blackboard?

 

It seems that the Standard Model faces an increasing number of challenges. And we would submit that the Theory of Everything may be even more elusive than the Holy Grail. Superstring theory and the value of the cosmological constant indicate that we are still facing monumental challenges as gravity and quantum theory are still far apart. In terms of empirical evidence, if that is the ultimate test of reality, such evidence for both aspects of what the universe holds in darkness, dark matter and dark energy, such validation is still glaringly missing in the laboratory.

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One camp says, “Give us more time (and money) we are almost there!” We are saying, “Look at the trends and see if things are converging or not. If they are not, maybe we need to look at the foundational issues of what we call reality with a fresh look”.

 

So instead of saying that physics has reached a crisis, which raises some hackles, it’s more objective to say that ever since the quantum revolution a century ago, matching theory and reality has become more difficult, not less difficult.  The supremacy of physics was based on theory marching ahead with empirical validation to back it up. This held true for all of classical physics, then for relativity and quantum mechanics. But unless a new paradigm springs up, it may turn out that we haven’t really begun to answer the Big Questions.

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DEEPAK CHOPRA MD, FACP, founder of The Chopra Foundation and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, is a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine and personal transformation, and is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.

Chopra is the author of more than 80 books translated into over 43 languages, including numerous New York Times bestsellers. TIME magazine has described Dr. Chopra as “one of the top 100 heroes and icons of the century.” The World Post and The Huffington Post global internet survey ranked Dr. Chopra #40 influential thinker in the world and #1 in Medicine. www.deepakchopra.com

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MENAS C. KAFATOS Ph.D., is the Fletcher Jones Endowed Professor of Computational Physics, at Chapman University. He is a quantum physicist, cosmologist, and climate change researcher and works extensively on consciousness. He holds seminars and workshops for individuals and corporations on the natural laws that apply everywhere for well-being and success. His doctoral thesis advisor was the renowned M.I.T. professor Philip Morrison who studied under J. Robert Oppenheimer. He has authored 300+ articles, is author or editor of 15 books, including “The Conscious Universe” (Springer) with Robert Nadeau, and is co-author with Deepak Chopra of the forthcoming book, “The Creative Cosmos” (Harmony). You can learn more at http://www.menaskafatos.com and follow him on Facebook: www.facebook.com/menas.kafatos Twitter:@mckafatos and LinkedIn: Menas Kafatos

Previous Posts

Sowing Seeds of Gratitude to Cultivate Wellbeing
Paul J. Mills, Tiffany Barsotti, Meredith A. Pung, Kathleen L. Wilson, Laura Redwine, and Deepak Chopra   Gratitude, along with love, compassion, empathy, joy, forgiveness, and self-knowledge, is a vital attribute of our wellbeing. ...

posted 3:51:06pm Sep. 03, 2015 | read full post »

Which Universe Do You Want to Live In? It's Your Choice
By Deepak Chopra, MD, and Menas Kafatos, PhD   The night sky that you can view from your back yard is roughly the same, given a few changes in the positions of stars, as the night sky Galileo turned his telescope on to. But visual ...

posted 10:54:49am Aug. 31, 2015 | read full post »

Meditation and the Spiritual Life of Children
By Deepak Chopra, MD When they become parents, many people wonder how to impart spiritual values to their children. The traditional model of sending them to Sunday school is one alternative; another is to draw the entire family into the ...

posted 10:42:06am Aug. 24, 2015 | read full post »

Do We Really Know What's Real? The Most Optimistic Answer Is Maybe
By Deepak Chopra, MD, and Menas Kafatos, PhD   For a very long time, if you wanted to know if something is real or not, the go-to people have been scientists. The rise of rationality over superstition is considered the single greatest ...

posted 1:06:30pm Aug. 03, 2015 | read full post »

Physics' Split Personality: Is the Dark Side Winning?
By Deepak Chopra, MD, and Menas Kafatos, PhD   For some time now most of the universe has gone dark. This startling news was brought to popular attention in a June Op-Ed piece in the New York Times called "A Crisis at the Edge of ...

posted 12:32:11pm Jul. 27, 2015 | read full post »

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