God's Politics

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Patty Kupfer: Immigration Reform Bill Dies

posted by God's Politics

Sadly, the Senate Immigration Bill failed a cloture vote yesterday morning (46/53—it needed 60 votes) and is now dead. This means the House will not be taking up the legislation and it isn’t likely to come back until at least 2009.
There is still much work to be done—holding our policymakers accountable for their lack of courage and leadership on this issue, making sure it remains part of the debate in presidential campaigns, and of course, more education work with faith communities and leaders about this critical issue.
Unfortunately, the workplace raids will continue and families will continue to be torn apart, making our collaboration with the New Sanctuary Movement all the more important. Please keep the millions of our country’s undocumented immigrants in your prayers in the coming month as they go on living in fear. May we not lose hope, but instead may this setback give us more strength and focus to grow the movement for inclusion and justice in this country.
And, thanks for all your support of our immigration work thus far. It has meant, and will continue to mean, a lot.
Christians for Comprehensive Immigration Reform has released a statement that reads:

It is a sad day in America when partisan politics can sideline one of the most important pieces of legislation to reach the U.S. Congress in years. Christians for Comprehensive Immigration Reform joins immigrant rights’ supporters around the country to express our extreme disappointment at the defeat of Senate immigration bill S 1639. What we saw in the United States Senate reinforces the polarization of our political system and condones xenophobia both in our country’s policies and rhetoric. We saw the defeat of reason, compromise and reconciliation.
As a result of these political games, the 12 million immigrants living in the shadows of our nation will continue in limbo, living in fear of deportation and separation from family. The legislation may have been defeated, but the issue is far from dead. Families are still in jeopardy, workers are still being exploited and the border is far from secure. As Christian churches, organizations and leaders, we are more committed than ever to holding our politicians accountable to the values they profess of family integrity and economic progress. We will continue our work in serving the needs of immigrant families and are merely beginning our campaign to appeal to the hearts and minds of Americans to do as Jesus instructed us, to welcome the stranger in our midst.

Patty Kupfer is the Christians for Comprehensive Immigration Reform campaign coordinator at Sojourners/Call to Renewal.



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Shawn

posted June 29, 2007 at 9:36 pm


“12 million immigrants living in the shadow” yada, yada is simply NOT the reason this bill was proposed in the first place. Democrats are not at all concerned with the Latinos for this reason. Recent public support for reforming the nation’s immigration laws did not come primarily from the immigrant-sympathetic left in this country.
Remember the Minute Men anybody?
The Kennedy McCain bill was a very liberal prescription for a problem brought to light mainly by conservatives, backed by an overwhelming majority of the US public (polls show 65 – 80%) in favor of simply ending the chaos of illegal border crossings first, then cleaning up enforcement matters second, then providing some vehicle for assimilation third IN THAT ORDER. This happened because Congress and the President repeatedly have shown the public that they are not trustworthy stewards of border security. In other words, the public is fed up with government fumbling at the border and has risen to oppose this effort, which seemed so strongly in the vein of “the public” vs. “the government.
This is, of course, a much greater concern in the context of a post-9/11 world. I find it typically hypocritical of Washington elites that members of Congress were lightning-quick to write laws establishing new postal regs for mail sent their way after a few grains of anthrax appeared on their own mail. Yet about the greatest potential security threat this country faces–invaders are quite free to dig tunnels and simply walk into this country, and despite strong public support, Congress remained ambivalent about border security.
After all, if we have a border, what’s it for? If we don’t want a border, then are we a country?



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Wolverine

posted June 29, 2007 at 11:49 pm


This bill was a complete perfecta of awfulness: bad drafting (numerous loopholes) of a bad policy (broad legalization) that only advanced as far as it did thanks to underhanded legislative tactics (skipping the regular committee process) and political miscalculation (so much for the McCain administration).
This craptacular deserved to crash and burn in a horrific fireball that was visible from space, which after some tense moments is more or less what happened.
Na na na na,
na na na na,
hey hey hey,
goodbye!
Wolverine



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2007 at 10:44 am


And now we are enjoying business as usual.
Employers still get employees whom they can pay too little for and demand too much from. Meanwhile we get cheap food and our grass is still green and newly mowed. We still get to tip someone named Juan or Juanita fifty cents for cleaning our hotel room and scrubbing our toilet while they have to listen to our conversations about evil, criminal, illegal, aliens. We still get to scapegoat poor Hispanics for everything from our busted education system to why it takes so long to get treated at our Emergency rooms, and let’s not forget how they are all stealing our taxes by collecting welfare.
We still get to believe that the English language is what holds us together as a people.
We still get to listen to Lou Dobbs tell us what our own horrible nightmares are, “Osama Ben whosit coming through the desert to blow us all away in a nuclear disaster.”
The mynoote men still get to run around on the border wearing camo fatigues thinking they are saving us all from becoming annexed to Mexico or Bolivia or whatever.
And on top of all these good things we can still blame Congress for not doing anything to solve the problem!!!
Gosh! We have so much to be thankful for!



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Wolverine

posted July 1, 2007 at 12:25 pm


Look, there’s no question things are broken, but the last thing we need is Congress passing a 300+ page bill that wasn’t reviewed in committee and that hardly anyone had any time to even read. We didn’t need legislation that repeated many of the same mistakes that got us into the current mes in the first place.
When your car isn’t working, you take it into the mechanic, and what you want to see is the mechanic doing some diagnostics and then carefully replacing broken parts. You’d probably find it reassuring if he kept you informed about what had gone wrong and what he was doing about it.
What we had was Congress trying to keep us in the dark about what they were doing, only to discover that they had been bashing the engine block with baseball bats. Yeah, the car’s still broken, but at least we managed to stop them before they did any more damage. Now maybe we’ll have a chance to hire some new mechanics, who will take the time to actually fix the frickin’ car.
Wolverine



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2007 at 12:53 pm


You repeat Sen’s Sessions, DeMint and Cornyn well. I watched and understood everything in the bill.
I could see it what it did and what it did not do.
All the talk about “not knowing” was pure and simple BS.
Any Senator who says they could have written a better bill could have offered to work on this one. (Others like Sen Kyl did) Instead they attempted everything they could to delay, stall and eventually kill it.
Politics is the art of compromise, I saw nothing resembling politics from those opposed.
Pure and simple. WE ARE STUCK WITH STATUS QUO, AND THE STATUS QUO SUCKS! Every American should be angry with that fact and not celebrating as you are in your post, regardless of their stance on this issue.
Anyone like you, Wolverine who does not now demand that Sessions, etal, come up with their alternative NOW and not wait till 2009, is at least leaving themselves wide open to the claim they do not want answers, just scapgoats and the ability to complain. A do nothing Congress is worthless.
We are not better off than we were. Saying we are better off than we might have been is a very hypothetical and lame excuse for doing nothing!
So nanana yourself to bed tonight and “dream a little dream” for Lou Dobbs of bombs bursting in air and little brown people “coming to take you away, Haha Hoho Heehee.”
An America too scared too do anything is pitiful indeed. An America which thinks of itself as the third world’s victim is absurd!



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Wolverine

posted July 1, 2007 at 1:44 pm


Whoever you are:
1. Why did the immigration bill have to skip through the regular committee process that nearly every other bill in Congress goes through?
2. Why were we presented, on two seperate occasions, with complex 300+ page bills only two days before the Senate was supposed to vote on them?
3. Why did Harry Reid resort to an obscure process (the now infamous “clay pidgeon”) to limit amendments on the Senate floor?
4. Why were the bill’s opponents limited to ten minutes of debate on the Senate floor before the final cloture vote, when the bill’s supporters had 50 minutes?
There are a lot of people out there (Norman Podhoretz for example) who were sympathetic to the ideal of legalization but who were taken aback by the way that this bill was being rammed through with little room for debate.
If the bill was so great (which I doubt), it probably would have stood up under more scrutiny, and a fair, open debate would have allowed its supporters to rebut every objection we raised.
I suggest that next time you:
1. Give the media, bloggers, think tanks, and the general public a week or two to look the thing over before it comes up on the floor for a vote.
2. Run it through the committee process.
3. Allow amendments and full, fair debate.
An America that’s too scared to do anything would indeed be pitiful. But political leaders who panic and try to slam legislation through without a fair open debate aren’t a whole lot better.
Wolverine



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2007 at 7:03 pm


Wolverine
Again you spout the arguements of Senators Session etal very very well.
They all could have been in on the crafting of this bill. They were not excluded.
And three weeks of debate is hardly a “cram” it through process.
The bottom line is when is this problem going to get fixed?
Who is going to have the political courage to bring another bill up?
Will we American citizens demand something more than just stall and block tactics?
If we have to wait until 2009 I predict Sessions and the rest will again be against any new measure.
If they truly want to do what the American public wants, then present a new bill.
The defeat of this bill is still DOING NOTHING!
Doing nothing is not what they were elected for.
Doing nothing is reason enough to de-elect them.
NOTHING IS NOT AN ANSWER.
SO INSTEAD OF CELEBRATING, HOW ABOUT WE GET THEM TO DO SOMETHING CONSTRUCTIVE? HOW ABOUT THEY WORK TOGETHER AND PRESENT US WITH A BILL THAT ANSWERS THE PROBLEM?
HOW ABOUT THAT HAPPENING BEFORE THE YEAR IS OUT?



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2007 at 7:17 pm


Do you really need to be reminded that doing NOTHING is exactly what got us into this mess?



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Wolverine

posted July 1, 2007 at 8:55 pm


Dear whoever,
I noticed that you did not address any of the actual questions. While we’ve had literally years to discuss illegal immigration in a general sense, the actual bill, all 300+ pages of it, were presented to us with little time to discuss its provisions. There was no committee markup and amendments were frozen out.
You can spout airy nonsense all day long but those are the facts. I suggest you accept the facts and deal with them.
Why don’t you try something different, like accepting responsibility for your own screwups?
For instance, resorting to underhanded legislative strategies that made the whole enterprise smell fishy to most Americans.
Or failing to make the case, openly and honestly, for legalization. As it was, the American public was, at best, unpersuaded.
You might also reconsider your continual demonization of President Bush, who was on your side on this issue.
As for Senators Sessions, well, I’ll admit there are certain similarities between his arguments and mine. So what? They were good arguments and in the end they proved to be persuasive. As far as I’m concerned I’m in good company.
Finally, it wasn’t doing “nothing” that got us into this mess, it was the amnesty bill of 1986. And you never were able to convince anyone that your precious bill was anything other than a repeat of that debacle.
Wolverine



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Anonymous

posted July 1, 2007 at 9:24 pm


Who in the heck are you talking to?
1986?
I am sorry that was one action with many years following in which something could have been done.
BUT INSTEAD NOTHING! You have no arguement here.
(as to my not answering your other points, for all you and I know, both sides are just spin. From what I watched I could not say any of that is what happened, merely what they said happened.
Blame blame blame, BLAH BLAH BLAH =’s NOTHING been done.
Do Something, Wolverine. Get your Senator and Reps to do something.
You cannot argue anything Pro or con,you cannot defend any action, pro or con, if in the end you do not DO SOMETHING!
Sessions, Demint, Cronyn, Dole, etal should all be de-elected if they do not respond with a bill on this subject.
Even Kyl, who did not like everything in this bill did something. If kyl was included your telling me Sessions could not have been if he had wanted to? Get real.



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Wolverine

posted July 2, 2007 at 12:03 am


There’s just enough truth in your last post to be worth a dignified response. The awkward truth is that our current problem has as much to do with our failure to enforce the current law as it does with any particular legislation. The most constructive action Congress could take would be to hold hearings on the failure to police the border and enforce workplace restrictions on the hiring of illegal immigrants.
Wolverine



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2007 at 1:58 am


That would be great, if all we needed to do was discover why we did NOTHING from yesterday back to 1986.This discovery would probably give us even more people to be mad at while we continued to do NOTHING today.
I’ve got a better idea.
How about we all buy a goat, lay our hands on him and then slit his throat?
Then perhaps we might be nice to each other or, God forbid, be nice to our Hispanic visitors, Oh… and we could still do NOTHING.
Awkward truth? Now that is an understatement?
Congress investigating this situation?
What an incredible answer. You should run for the Senate. How about they actually do SOMETHING?
Is this getting too redundant for you?
I certainly hope so.
What happened to you Wolverine?
You’ve always had so many arguments against everything. Are you having trouble coming up with something constructive?



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Mick Sheldon

posted July 2, 2007 at 5:36 am


This bill failing shows hope that corporations do not have the final say in what happens in our country . Maybe they have more influence then the rest of us , but we the people still have a say when we speak up .
A bill that is designed to stop the future problem of illegal immigration occuring on its present abundance is what is needed . Handle that , then we can handle together how to help the souls , all of us included in that , who are here now .



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Wolverine

posted July 2, 2007 at 9:35 am


The problem is that as long as the executive branch is lackadaisical about enforcing immigration law, there’s very little “constructive” that can be done by the legislature.
As one poster at National Review’s Corner blog put it, until we start enforcing the law that’s already on the books, Congress may as well write a bill that says we’ll build a wall 200 feet high and 100 feet wide, manned by orcs with frickin’ lasers. It’ll do us about as much good.
There’s no short cut around enforcement.
Wolverine



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2007 at 10:45 am


Wolverine
If enforcement is the secret answer why are our prisons filled (and we are building more and more,) yet drug addiction and all the crime that is its result growing?
If that is answered why do all of these workers find jobs? It’s not just because there are evil corporations who want to enslave us all with the wages of poverty. The jobs are here to be filled.
The end result is the Tancreado’s, Sessions, Demints, Cronyns of our country are bowing to the fear of guys like you.
If fear is not the essential thing driving your opinions then why are you not pushing for you Senators to produce a bill that will solve this issue?
One answer would be you really do not care about the “souls” Mick refers to, at least not the ones who are not born here.
The problem remains. It has not gone away. those who stood against this bill have given us nothing to rejoice about.
According to Sessions this bill would only have reduce illegal immigration by 13%. So you are seemingly satisfied, even elated, with a problem that is now 13% bigger than it would have been had that bill passed.
How about a bill that increases enforcement,
enacts fines for all who entered without permission, and allows for some kind of temporary status for those here. This temporary status period is just for the purpose of doing the necessary background checks, and has a time limit that is reasonable.
All employers must verify their employees temporary status. No FICA benefits for any previously undocumented worker who achieve temorary status.
No FICA deductions from their pay checks either.
Employers however still must pay the portion they would have for documented workers.
Employers required to provide minimum healthcare for all under this arrangement. (ONe of those “cheap” policies DeMint extolled.
No one gets out of temporary status without going back to their country of origen and applying through legal channels for a visa. (forget the waiting until the “line” clears.)
All children who have been raised here but not born here, are covered by the Dream Act.
Once back ground checks have been accomplished, permanent status is only achieved by going back to country of origen, “temporary” status remains if they do not do so, but only so long as they are gainfully employed on a full time basis.
Anyone who lifts themselves up through private business ownership and home ownership, thereby proving economic stability, can achieve full status, assuming background checks have been accomplished and fines have been paid. Citizenship can only be met by going back to their country of origen and applying through revised channels for a visa and a green card.
Then change the whole quota system we now have for something more balanced sane and reasonable.
Establish a commission that reports to the nation the status and effectiveness of our border security measures. Change and enhance them as needed.



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Wolverine

posted July 2, 2007 at 11:08 am


If enforcement is the secret answer why are our prisons filled (and we are building more and more,) yet drug addiction and all the crime that is its result growing?
Who says?
If that is answered why do all of these workers find jobs?
Again, who says they all find jobs. To the extent they do find jobs, a lot of it is because employers can avoid US labor laws (minimum wage, overtime, safety, workers comp, unemployment insurance, union recognition) by hiring illegal labor.
If fear is not the essential thing driving your opinions then why are you not pushing for you Senators to produce a bill that will solve this issue?
How many times are we going to have to repeat this?
Congress can’t solve this if the law isn’t enforced.
Congress can’t solve this if the law isn’t enforced.
Congress can’t solve this if the law isn’t enforced.
Congress can’t solve this if the law isn’t enforced.
(repeat as often as necessary for essential fact to penetrate thick skull)
How about a bill that increases enforcement,
enacts fines for all who entered without permission, and allows for some kind of temporary status for those here. This temporary status period is blah blah blah…

Ooh, ooh, I got an idea! Why don’t we pass a law that says illegal immigrants must wear clown costumes to work? Or how about saying that all illegal immigrants can use Monopoly money as legal tender? Or they can stay as long as they immitate Cheech and Chong? (I mean the funny accents, not the marijuana smoking part.)
Or we could try something really different and start enforcing the law in a meaningful way and see what happens.
Look, enforcement can take any of a variety of forms and does not require mass deportations. Enhancing workplace enforcement gradually is my preferred method. (We can start in the north and extend it to the border states in a couple years.)
We do not have to be inhumane about it and we don’t have to do it all at once. But unless we actually enforce the law it doesn’t matter what bill Congress passes.
Wolverine



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2007 at 11:34 am


So all you really want is for all “mexicans” to go home!
Now I see why you rejoice so much!
Nananana
Hehheheh
goodbye!
You really are just like Senator Sessions etal.
You are not for enforcement so much as you are for banishment.
Humane? I do not see it. You just want everyone to leave without you having to dirty your hands.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2007 at 11:54 am


Totally Wolverine. Humane attrition of families. I like it.
Tell you what homeboy, I am going to come and humanely arrest your family members at their workplace (probably not seeing them for awhile), while also denying them the ability to access emergency health care and, don’t forget, no school for your kids (property taxes, shmoperty taxes) – but don’t worry buddy, it’ll be humane.
By they way, tell Professor X I said what up…
Sci-Fi Neo-cons, what’ll they think of next.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2007 at 1:45 pm


ideport
Wolverine would never arrest anybody. He would just sort of humanely starve them out. He would exclude them from all forms of legal sustenance and self sufficiency and into the more typical historical immigrant roles of organized crime.
He would do all this not because he is in anyway anything but a patriotic fellow who only wants what is best for the country.
He goes to church and prays to God whom he professes to love and adore. He prays for your and my safety from all the evils in the world.
In short he would do anything as long as it results in nothing and gives him somebody, anybody, to blame for everything.
Call your Senator and demand they do their job!
It is why we elected them. It is what they get paid for.
DEPORT ALL SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES OUT OF D.C. WHO DO NOT WORK TOGETHER TO COME UP WITH A VIABLE SOLUTION.
THE INACTION OF GOVERNMENT CAUSED THIS MESS. DO NOT LET THEM GET AWAY WITH IT AGAIN.



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letjusticerolldown

posted July 2, 2007 at 3:27 pm


Wolverine
There is complete justification to mistrust the Government’s capacity and will to govern immigration. But there is also a grave cost to pay when citizens refuse to allow a government to act. It can sound noble–but it is one step from paralysis. And this is not paralysis in a static situation. It is paralysis in a very fluid situation.
Immigration policy is the interface between a nation/culture with many severe fractures and a global population on the move. These realities are not under the government’s control and any immigration policy will have serious holes.
All the ‘Speed Limit’ signs and highway patrol are not going to stop 200 million speeders in this nation. There are likely thousands of actions to be taken to advance better immigration policy/practice/enformcement. If no one can act until the problem is solved–we are at paralysis.
President Bush came in office with reform high on his agenda. Neither a Republican or Democratic Congress could put something on his desk.
The political capacity to act is not an asset that is easily built, sustained, or to be taken for granted. I do value the movement of citizens who wanted this bill stopped. That too is valuable. But there are always unintended consequences to our actions–and I am severely concerned that our primary and common enemy at this point (on many issues) is paralysis and irresponsibility (from illegal immigrant to citizen to President).



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kevin s.

posted July 2, 2007 at 3:31 pm


Doing something poorly is not necessarily preferable to doing nothing. What if the solution was to execute every illegal immigrant? If the Senate defeated that bill, would you be using this line of argument? This bill sucked. It didn’t pass. Perhaps you should call your senator and ask for legislation that makes a measure of sense and can gain the public’s support.



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2007 at 3:40 pm


Amen to “Justice”
I say let it roll!
If we cannot defend, manage, or even cope with our own borders and our own neighbors, the “problem” is worse than we ever thought or imagined.
Everybody is so serious about their problems with the legislation but no one was working together to correct them. The nation is just about evenly divided on this so it will take a compromise none of us are going to like. Then we have to have some mechanism to correct and amend our answers to fit the scenario. As LetJusticeroll said this is a fluid situation, and believe me, if we do nothing it will get worse. It really doesn’t matter which side you are on. Letting the Federal Gov’t off the hook until 2009, (hoping somehow, magically, they then get the will to act) will not be a better idea.
Wolverine start coming up with ideas that bridge gaps instead of just those that fit your “ism”.
Work for solutions, or get out of town!
What I saw during all the weeks of “debate” was such namby pamby nonsense it made me sick!



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Wolverine

posted July 2, 2007 at 4:06 pm


Look, I’ve given you a relatively straightforward action item: enforce the law. I’ll admit this is probably not going to be a complete solution, but it is the necessary first step that must be taken before any other program will have a realistic chance of working.
We are at impasse because you do not want the law enforced — at least not without first making 12 million exceptions.
As for the debate being “namby pamby nonsense”, well, that just gets back to my original point — one that you have yet to take up — that an honest debate was never allowed. But accepting that fact would mean accepting that your side made mistakes, a possibility that you seem unable to handle.
You cheated, and yet you still lost. But somehow it’s all our fault. Whatever.
Wolverine



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Anonymous

posted July 2, 2007 at 10:00 pm


Kevin
Done it of course.
The anti reform guys stopped this one now it their turn.
I still say any Senator who does not do so is obviously satisfied with the status quo.
given the mood of the nation about immigration I say vote them out.
the problem did not go away. they are elected to manage just these sort of things ar they not?
If one of these Senators came up with a bill calling for the inhumane treatment of the 12 million undocumented perhaps we would finally see reality.(killing them Kevin? Come on! Go suck your thumb!)
It is time to come out of the closet for the anti reform “minute men” types.
You either want to solve the problem or you don’t. You either have a humane idea of how to do so or you don’t.
All their complaining about how immigration is ruining the country demands that they now take action or no one needs to take any of them seriously. If they do not they will prove themselves to be just whiners, or is it wieners?
We will always have complainers.
We will always have fear mongers.
We do not always have to listen to them.
Put up or shut up!



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Moderatelad

posted July 3, 2007 at 10:22 am


This bill should have died a long time ago. When it comes to immigration – the door is shut and solid. Now – you want to enter, there are things that need to be covered first inorder for the knob to be turned and the door opened for you. This bill at best was a set of Saloon Doors that offered no protection and waved in the breeze no matter what direction is was blowing. This bill offered no protection or control of the situation. I wonder if Nancy or Harry would pay to install a security system in the homes that offered the same level of protection this bill offered the US – NOT!
Happy Fireworks everyone –
.



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Anonymous

posted July 3, 2007 at 10:51 am


dear Moderatelad
I have news for you. The door is not shut! The Saloon is still open and those swinging doors are swinging fast.
Nothing has changed in this regard from 1986 till today.
Kevin, Mick, Wolverine, all of you have no reason to be either smug or to rejoice.
Every dollar we are now paying to “secure” the border is an obviously wasted dollar because the border is not secure.
No one has any reason to be happy with the way things are today.
Everyone should be pressuring their Congress to readdress this issue and to work together to solve it.
The complaints about the way this bill was presented and the accusation that it was cheating is astounding. It’s called Parliamentary Procedure and as such cannot be called anything but a use of one of the tools provided for anyone to use. It did not work but it certainly cannot be in anyway described as cheating.
In the end I guess all of you “rule of law” guys only like the rules you like and which have your desired outcome. So I/we need not pay any attention to all of your complaints and concerns for the rules as your hypocrisy is amazingly evident.
If you are not a hypocrit-
If you really are a patriot-
If you want to characterize yourself as a minuteman for Jesus,
CALL ON THE SENATE AND THE HOUSE TO DO THEIR JOB!



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memo

posted July 12, 2007 at 11:17 pm


SOME OF YOU ARE INSULTING AMERICAN SOLDIERS OF HISPANIC DESCENT !
Part of my family lives in USA, part of my family lives in Mexico.
One of my uncles fought in the Second World War in Europe. Two other were stationed ready to go abroad when the war ended.
A cousin of mine went to Vietnam.
One of my nephews has been to Iraq (not only once, but twice !!).
My other nephew is presently fighting in Afghanistan.
Both of my nephews are with the Marine Corps. Semper fi.
The parents of all these American soldiers, my relatives, came here first without proper documentation, with the exception of one, thus illegally. Even one of these Marines was born in Mexico.
They were willing to make the ultimate sacrifice for their new country.
Let me remind you that many Mexicans came to USA during the Second World War to work in agriculture and other industries, because the male population was drafted to fight overseas in Europe and Japan..
Many of the present Hispanics are the descendants of those people that stayed here.
Some of these soldiers are from parents that were once illegal. They have even joined the military and died in foreign countries
Let me repeat McCain’s words in one of the debates:
“My friends, I want you the next time you’re down in Washington, D.C. to go to the Vietnam War Memorial and look at the names engraved in black granite,” he said. “You’ll find a whole lot of Hispanic names.”
My uncles and cousins of my American family are in disbelief by some statements.
United we stand.
Divided we fall



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memo

posted July 12, 2007 at 11:20 pm


WHEN IS THE LAW, THE LAW?
SOME OF YOU ARE CLAIMING HE RULE OF LAW
Why are you claiming the rule of law against people that came here to work? Work that many of you don’t want to perform.
“Rule of law” means enforcing laws that are capable of enforcement, otherwise people merely learn disrespect for the law. Obviously, immigration laws that refuse to recognize the inevitable attraction of a lack of unskilled labor on one side of the border and a lack of employment for unskilled labor on the other is not workable no matter how much of the taxpayers’ billions get poured down a rathole of “enhanced” enforcement
Did you forget about the prohibition time, when many illegal activities flourished, including the rise of the mafia? This is exactly what happens when laws are NOT capable of enforcement. Black market and illicit activities are the result.
Did you know that President Carter gave pardon for those that did not join the war in Vietnam? Many went to Canada, and others flew to Mexico.
You sure know that President Ford gave full pardon to Nixon because of the Watergate scandal.
And according to what it is known, Nixon violated blatantly the law in many issues and on a great scale.
This does not mean that therefore, others must violate the law. But what I am saying is that in the history of this great country there are some examples of amnesty or whatever you want to call it.
But you are in uproar claiming this very same rule of law.
Ruthless to the poor, but silent for others. Quick to harm the weak, but smiling to the strongest.
Isn’t this called hypocrisy?



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memo

posted July 12, 2007 at 11:22 pm


WALLS HAVE NEVER WORKED IN HISTORY:
HAVE NEVER WORKED
The Chinese wall, it didn’t work,
The Berlin wall: a complete failure, but yet you want to built one along the border of Mexico.
The Maginot Line (a line of concrete fortifications, tank obstacles, machine gun posts and other defenses which France constructed along its borders with Germany). Another failure.
This last term is sometimes used today to describe any comically ineffective protection.
One thing is certain; all have proven his futility and uselessness.
Listen to the song from Ton Russell:
I’ve got 800 miles of open border – right
outside my door. There’s minute men in little
pick up trucks who’ve declared their own
damn war. Now the government wants to build
a barrier like old Berlin 8 feet tall – But if
Uncle Sam sends the illegals home
who’s gonna build the wall?
Who’s gonna build your wall boys?
Who’s gonna mow your lawn?
Who’s gonna cook your food when your mexican maid is gone?
Who’s gonna wax the floors tonight down at the local mall?
Who’s gonna wash your baby’s face?
Who’s gonna build your wall?



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memo

posted July 12, 2007 at 11:26 pm


IT IS PURE FOLLY …
It is pure folly to say that we will force 11 million people back across the border in order to obtain legal entry. Such a forced population movement would be unparalleled in American history and would be reminiscent of German-Polish-Russian forced migrations during the years right before, during, and after World War II.
I’m all for securing the border and getting our immigration system sorted out, but I just can’t help thinking that had the senate’s proposed point system been in place 150 years ago, some of your ancestors from Europe (Sweden, Germany & Ireland) would probably never been able to get in this country…



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memo

posted July 12, 2007 at 11:33 pm


JUST A THOUGHT
Several decades ago, immigrants from Hispanic origin came to the USA. They didn’t bother to participate in politics. They came to work and nothing else. Why to bother if the country was going OK. They didn’t speak the language very well and they thought let’s leave politics in the hands of those who are in power. Working and keeping a job was their main goal. Many even didn’t bother to change their immigrant status as residents.
But a couple of years ago, particularly this year, something happened. Because they can not be recognized or distinguished by appearance, with the so called illegals, they started to realize that they had to become citizens to obtain a higher level of protection. They realized that they were being demonized. Many of them are coming to vote for the first time.
Some of this population belongs to the group that came with the amnesty offered by President Reagan in 1986-1988. They too started to become citizens. There is no way that anyone can identify an illegal alien just by looking at them. You cannot tell who is an American citizen just by looking. Latino voters are tired of getting treated as something less than real Americans.
They could be legally here; they could have lived in the U.S. for generations. The only marker is skin color. The effect of the immigration debate on many Latino voters has been to make them feel like their Americanness is being questioned, even if they have been here for many generations.
The rampant xenophobia encased in fear of terrorism has made it critical for the legal immigrants, once illegal, to acquire the status that would grant them immunity from narrow legal persecution. However, it is not strange that in this xenophobic wave these people are feeling being threatened and insulted..
In the meantime, the Republicans had their chance for about 6 years to make a statement that the republican party would take care of the American people and they really showed they don’t care by their non-actions and clearly directed actions against inmigrants. Republicans have been filibustering everything that comes up in the Senate.
It is true that some Democrats such as Jim Webb, Jon Tester and Claire McCaskill vote with the majority of Republicans to kill the Senate immigration compromise, without offering a realistic and achievable alternative that would establish a more humane policy.
But, it is also undeniable that the most vicious, the most wretched, the most offensive, the most revolting, the most ruthless, the most vilifying, the most repulsive attacks have come and are still coming from Republicans.
Just a few examples to illustrate it.
1) Sensenbrenner wanted the criminalization of these people.
2) Newt Gingrich, Former House speaker, who coined Spanish as the Language of the gheto
3) Fred Thompson just slammed Cubans, suggesting that they come to America not in search of freedom, but to bring “suitcase bombs.”
4) Dana Rohrabacher in his speeches is warning “the end of America as we know it”.
5) Tancredo, his motto: “a scourge that threatens the very future of our nation.”
6) J.D Hayworth, not reelected, but still instilling hate. No comments.
The list goes on and on.. .
From the beginning, the bill’s most forceful opponents were southern Republicans. GOP Sens. David Vitter of Louisiana, Jim DeMint of South Carolina and Jeff Sessions of Alabama led the charge, often backed by Texan John Cornyn.
One thing is certain, the past six years, the Republicans were mum on all issues with immigration reform as just one of them. They controlled the white house and congress. If there is anytime in which a party is able to get things done, it’s when they don’t have anyone to really interfere.
Immigration was just one of them.
Indeed, the Hispanic vote is hardly a monolithical block. But what the anti inmigrant rethoric has done is bringing them closer together, solidifying this block.
Therefore, it seems to me that the most recalcitrant and extreme positions are from Republicans, where no room is for middle ground. This whole episode has branded the Republicans as the anti-inmigrant party.
So Republicans have done this at a national level. Pretty transparent move they did, and now the immigrant population, IRISH, PHILLIPINOS and many other immigrant groups, particularly HISPANICS, are aware of this issue.
As mentioned before, the most vicious, the most wretched, the most offensive, the most revolting, the most ruthless, the most vilifying, the most repulsive attacks have come and are still coming from Republicans.
At any rate, this is the beginning of the legal immigrant backlash directed against the Republican Party for their position on the immigration bill.
By your actions, you shall be judged.!



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