Flower Mandalas

Flower Mandalas


Spirituality and Art / Spiritual Art

Blue_Morning_Glory_II.jpg
Blue Morning Glory II flower mandala
Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about spirituality and art. So far, my thoughts are vague and unformed, but I’m aware that in my own life, my work as an artist and my spiritual development have been running in tandem for a long time, often intersecting.
I’d be very intersted in hearing from others their thoughts on this: on how either making or experiencing some kind of art has related to their sense of themselves as spiritual beings, and their growth in this area. Spirituality has been so much a part of art, and art so much a part of places of worship in all cultures and, as far as I know, for as long as there have been places of worship, that they must be intricately interwoven in the human soul. It would be interesting to start to figure out how and why, and how to tweak that interweaving in our own lives to make both more accessible.
Please let us know your thoughts, either here or in the parallel post in the Art, Healing, and Transformation group.
More anon,
- David
David J. Bookbinder, LMHC
Discussion:
Spirituality and Art / Spiritual Art
Art, Healing, and Transformation group
Flower Mandalas Project group

© 2008, David J. Bookbinder



  • Chandra6

    Funny you should ask. I have been pondering this issue recently, too.
    I have recognized for a long time that the space artistic inspiration comes from, and the place I “go to” in meditation seem to be the same. Now I see that one is expressed outward as the creative principle, the other inward as transformation, and returning to Spirit. It’s all dancing in the bliss of my true nature. Sometimes Shiva’s dance creates the universe, and sometimes it pulls it back in. Some things are always being created and some dissolved.
    When I express myself in the world coming from the Self, I embody the creative principle. It makes no difference if I create something material, an idea, space for yoga students to evolve. Even the most mundane activity can become art when it is performed with consciousness. It is Spirit expressing itself in a material way. It’s true that the specific make-up of our present identity gives its special flavor to what and how we create. That’s how we can bring our gift to the world. Sometimes/ often artists have unconscious access to the deeper levels, perhaps from channels created in previous lives. In this light, the preverbal big ego of some artists is a cosmic joke. It just reflects what the yogis call avidya, the case of mistaken identity we operate under in this life, in a big way.

  • jan mowka

    david,
    i too am an artist and my most true work is based on my spiritual nature.
    one does not exist without the other in my world…..all is spirit, all is art.
    i am sane when i take time to make beauty and order.
    thank you for doing your lovely mandalas
    jan

Previous Posts

Imagination and Reality
Imagination and Reality This showed up in my morning email, via Tricycle magazine, a wonderful center for all things Buddhist: "Imagination draws its energy from a confrontation with desire. It feeds off desire, transmuting and magnifying reality through desire's power. Fantasy does the opposite

posted 9:57:16pm Jan. 22, 2014 | read full post »

Help me choose the 4-5 best essays!
Dear Readers, I'm planning to enter an essay/memoir contest and need to choose 4-5 of the Fifty-Two Flower Mandalas essays from the 58 I've written so far. If any of you have particular essays you remember liking more than others, I'd love to hear about it, as I have no objectivity with them.

posted 10:43:51am Dec. 23, 2013 | read full post »

"Art of Healing" podcast by Bernie Siegel
Art of Healing Just a quick note to let you know about a new podcast on the Art of Healing by Bernie Siegel. The podcast comes to me through the Art and Healing Network. Here's a link to their current podcasts, including this new one by Dr. Siegel: The Art of Healing with Dr. Bernie Siegel More

posted 11:53:09am Dec. 19, 2013 | read full post »

Part III: Art and 'Madness' - Schizophrenic art
Works by schizophrenic artists Adolfi Wolfli (left) and Arthur Bispo do Rosario (right) Part III: Art and ‘Madness’ Schizophrenic art Copyright 2013, David J. Bookbinder Toward the end of the 19th century, the Romantic preoccupation with the idea that genius and madness were linked promp

posted 10:21:24am Dec. 16, 2013 | read full post »

Mandalas: Alexey Kljatov's snowflakes
"Snow Flower" by Alexey Kljatov. Creative Commons license. Some rights reserved. Mandalas: Alexey Kljatov's snowflakes Copyright 2013, David J. Bookbinder Just a quick note to let you know about the fascinating, mandala-like snowflake photographs of Alexey Kljatov. Using simple, inexpensive equ

posted 10:10:13am Dec. 02, 2013 | read full post »




Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.