Flirting with Faith

Flirting with Faith

Holy Saturday: Thoughts on Sacrifice

posted by Joan Ball

Woke this morning thinking about sacrifice and how infrequently most of us, myself included, actually sacrifice anything of true value to ourselves for God and others. Sure we give money to our favorite charities. But when is the last time we actually parted with money that would have gone to paying our bills or buying food for ourselves or our families for someone in deeper need?

And yes, we donate our time. But rarely when to do so places an inordinate burden on our own schedules or the needs of our immediate families and friends.

While there are many interpretations of what it means to live out the Christian faith, it is hard to weave through Eastertide without recognizing that following Jesus requires us to die to ourselves and reemerge a living sacrifice, learning to become people who can love and serve friends, enemies and the world beyond what is practical.  Yet we toss those words and concepts around, feigning awe at Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross while serving our own personal needs, comforts and political agendas.

I wonder what our communities would look like if we actually lived this out? If we dispensed with following Jesus in ideology or philosophy and began shouldering the cross in the world into complete, humble sacrificial service to others?

I suppose taking the step in my own life and encouraging others to do the same is one way to find out…

Does the Protestant Work Ethic Hold Up in the 21st Century

posted by Joan Ball

This was originally posted last year, but it’s on my mind again today…

Reading a “secular” textbook this morning about the roots of Americans’ tendency to define themselves by the work they do and came across this:

“Calvin’s doctrine of predestination led his followers [to view] success in work…as a visible sign that one was predestined to eternal life. This view of work resulted in the notion that one was obligated by God to achieve the highest possible, and most rewarding, occupation. As a result, striving for upward mobility became morally justified. Thus, the Reformation brought about the view of work labeled as ‘the Protestant work ethic’. The value attached to hard work, the need for all persons to work, and the justification of profit emerging for Calvinism would eventually form the basis of modern capitalism and industrialism.” (Niles and Harris-Bowelsby, 2002).

Whether we identify as Christian, Wiccan, Atheist, Agnostic, Jewish, Hindu, Muslim or New Ager, most Americans have embraced these principles to one degree or another when it comes to work. Wondering your thoughts on this. Have you considered our cultural predisposition to “more is better” to be rooted in Calvinism? Does this perspective on work hold up in the 21st century? Should it?

 

Niles, S.G. & Harris-Bowlesby, J. H. (2002). Career development interventions in the 21st century. Merrill Prentice Hall: New Jersey.

 

Does the Protestant Work Ethic Hold Up in the 21st Century?

posted by Joan Ball

This was originally posted last year, but it’s on my mind again today…

Reading a “secular” textbook this morning about the roots of Americans’ tendency to define themselves by the work they do and came across this:

“Calvin’s doctrine of predestination led his followers [to view] success in work…as a visible sign that one was predestined to eternal life. This view of work resulted in the notion that one was obligated by God to achieve the highest possible, and most rewarding, occupation. As a result, striving for upward mobility became morally justified. Thus, the Reformation brought about the view of work labeled as ‘the Protestant work ethic’. The value attached to hard work, the need for all persons to work, and the justification of profit emerging for Calvinism would eventually form the basis of modern capitalism and industrialism.” (Niles and Harris-Bowelsby, 2002).

Whether we identify as Christian, Wiccan, Atheist, Agnostic, Jewish, Hindu, Muslim or New Ager, most Americans have embraced these principles to one degree or another when it comes to work. Wondering your thoughts on this. Have you considered our cultural predisposition to “more is better” to be rooted in Calvinism? Does this perspective on work hold up in the 21st century? Should it?

 

Niles, S.G. & Harris-Bowlesby, J. H. (2002). Career development interventions in the 21st century. Merrill Prentice Hall: New Jersey.

 

Maundy Thursday: Inspirational Holy Week Stories for an Extraordinary Season…

posted by Joan Ball
Wondering about the meaning of Holy Week and Easter? A new friend and talented author, pastor, artist Dr. David McDonald, has created a helpful site called The Common Truth: Ordinary Stories for an Extraordinary Season that offers thought-provoking daily reflections and inspirational Easter season stories for Palm SundayFig MondayGreat TuesdaySpy Wednesday, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday and Easter Sunday.
Check out a Maundy Thursday story here…
And if you are interested in learning more about the earlier days of Holy Week check out a Fig Monday story here…

Great Tuesday story here…

And a Spy Wednesday story here…

 

Visit The Common Truth or keep up with David on his blog or at Westwinds Community Church

 

Previous Posts

Does the Protestant Work Ethic Hold Up in the 21st Century
This was originally posted last year, but it's on my mind again today... Reading a "secular" textbook this morning about the roots of Americans' tendency to define themselves by the work they do and came across this: "Calvin's doctrine of predestination led his followers [to view] success in wor

posted 2:48:59pm Feb. 13, 2012 | read full post »

Does the Protestant Work Ethic Hold Up in the 21st Century?
This was originally posted last year, but it's on my mind again today... Reading a "secular" textbook this morning about the roots of Americans' tendency to define themselves by the work they do and came across this: "Calvin's doctrine of predestination led his followers [to view] success in wor

posted 12:57:29pm May. 25, 2011 | read full post »

Holy Saturday: Thoughts on Sacrifice
Woke this morning thinking about sacrifice and how infrequently most of us, myself included, actually sacrifice anything of true value to ourselves for God and others. Sure we give money to our favorite charities. But when is the last time we actually parted with money that would have gone to paying

posted 9:50:42am Apr. 23, 2011 | read full post »

Maundy Thursday: Inspirational Holy Week Stories for an Extraordinary Season...
Wondering about the meaning of Holy Week and Easter? A new friend and talented author, pastor, artist Dr. David McDonald, has created a helpful site called The Common Truth: Ordinary Stories for an Extraordinary Season that offers thought-provoking daily reflections and inspirational Easter season

posted 9:51:07am Apr. 21, 2011 | read full post »

An Ordinary Holy Week Primer for an Extraordinary Season...
Wondering about the meaning of Holy Week and Easter? A new friend and talented author, pastor, artist Dr. David McDonald, has created a helpful site called The Common Truth: Ordinary Stories for an Extraordinary Season that offers thought-provoking daily reflections on Palm Sunday, Fig Monday, Grea

posted 12:27:39am Apr. 19, 2011 | read full post »


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