Beliefnet
Everyday Spirituality

A prayer before the CROP walk

A prayer before the CROP walk

Churches in the nearby Village participated in the annual CROP Walk. A chipper group of participants walked 6 miles to raise funds to fight hunger.

The CROP walk began circa 1947. The CROP acronym has since outgrown itself. Originally intended as the Christian Rural Overseas Program, CROP’s mission has expanded out of primarily sharing food from Midwest farm families to help feed European post-World War II neighbors, into a mission that now strives to feed the world. CROP walk funds also used to assist during disasters and to provide clean water worldwide.

The United Ministry Church hosts the event. This was their 30th year and they’ve raised over $135,000. Combining the walk with community spirit, they also hosted a soup and bread dinner after the walk.

Eddie

Eddie

The conduit to freedom appears to be the game of soccer, however, after briefly speaking with Eddie Kingston, the conclusion is made that freedom comes from an indomitable spirit. The life-force of Eddie Kingston moved him out of the war torn country of Liberia only to return years later through a Play For Peace Foundation. The Foundation is designed to help kids find inspiration. “Our family escaped Liberia when I was about 12 years old,” said Eddie Kingston unpretentiously. “We lived at a refugee camp in Ghana for over 3 years.” After receiving Asylum status, the family came to America and the adventure for Eddie continued.

While on a soccer scholarship, Eddie Kingston earned a Criminal Justice degree and a Pre-law degree from the University of Illinois. He qualified as an All-American his Freshman, Sophomore, and Senior year. After college, he was recruited to play professional soccer. “I played professionally for 7 years,” said Kingston. “I played for clubs in the countries of Zagreb, Croatia, then 3 years in South East Asia.” Because Eddie Kingston played in Liberia when he was younger, he represented his home country of Liberia.

When asked how many languages he speaks, Kingston modestly remarks, “Five. I probably have a knack for learning different languages, but I had to work very hard to learn them because I had to know what the coaches were saying.” Kingston attributes his quick learning to the fact that words came easier while out on the soccer field where he could relate the words with an action.

“I played for Liberia between 2002 and 2004 in an International Soccer Competition, involving many countries,” said Kingston.  The invitation to play goes to a select group, the best and Eddie Kingston took the opportunity and worked hard to excel. Today, the efforts are aimed to succeed the Play for Peace Foundation, meant to bring soccer to kids in Liberia, showing them there are positive things to do in life.

Today, to give back to the world, Eddie Kingston is devoted to Play for Peace.

Adam tearing apart old trailer

Adam tearing apart old trailer

Our neighbor, Adam, is building a micro-house. Adam built it on an old trailer, so the micro-house is mobile.

Adam has collected unused materials and is constructing it very affordably.

I walk over to watch Adam work. He enjoys the project even though he doesn’t have any fancy tools to work with. His spirits are high because his goal is to live leaving a small footprint on earth.

Venus, the Italian Greyhound dog, who is visiting me, walks over with me. Venus is sort of like a micro-dog and Adam’s house looks her size.

I don’t know how long Adam will live in the micro-house. He will also be using solar panels for an electricity source. Not everyone can live in

Venus in picture with Adam building new walls

Venus, pictured on the ground in a green coat, watches Adam build new walls

such a small house, but Adam’s big idea of smaller impact on earth is worth melding into everyday life.

 

 

 

Isaiah 60:22

The least one shall become a clan,
and the smallest one a mighty nation;
I am the Lord;
in its time I will hasten it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

one piece of roof on from back

Adam has second floor up

 

Last year, a local Town here in upstate New York started sponsoring a 5K Turkey Trot. It was held the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Needless to say, the turnout for the run was great. Many of the participants were thrilled to have this new community activity after overeating on Thanksgiving Day.

Another Turkey Trot is scheduled for this year. For those who don’t run or jog, the Town mapped out one mile for a Stroll.

Community members see this event as a replacement of the Village Days that, after decades, finally went defunct. I wonder, how does an event start out so good only to become such a burden?

Rituals, routines, and traditions can bring about goodness, however, change happens and if the traditions don’t adapt to the changes appropriately, more harm is done than good. Competition, misunderstandings, and ridiculous expectations can ruin the goodness. When the harm outweighs the benefits, we can fearlessly let go of the tradition and move forward with a new tradition.

From 21st Century Science and Health, “Humanity must learn that the influences of propaganda or crowd thinking are powerless. Crowd thinking is oppressive, but only a phase of nothingness. Christian Science devastates the vacuum of evil thinking and preeminently promotes good-will and virtue in families and therefore in the community.”