Advertisement

Everyday Spirituality

Everyday Spirituality

Celebrating Black History

Black History is nearing an end. Our community newspaper has printed a series of profiles celebrating the milestones and individuals in American black history. Here are a few:

James Weldon Johnson. Born 1871, the second of three children, James Weldon went on to become a future teacher, poet, songwriter, and civil rights activist  While still serving as a public school principal, Johnson studied law and became the first African American to pass the bar exam in Florida. Johnson—displeased with the racial stereotypes propagated by popular music—enrolled at Columbia University in 1903 to expand his literary horizons. In 1916, Weldon was offered the post of field secretary for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. He went on to assemble three ground-breaking anthologies: The Book of American Negro Poetry (1922), The Book of American Negro Spirituals (1925), and The Second Book of Negro Spirituals (1926).

Advertisement

Lucy Stanton Sessions (1831-1910) Lucy Stanton was born as a freed inhabitant of Cleveland, Ohio. She is believed to be the first African American woman to graduate from college, attaining a degree from Oberlin College in 1850. After college she moved to Columbus, Ohio, and became a Principal to a school. Life entailed more moving during a time when she taught fugitive slaves. Later in life, after a divorce, she remarried and the family moved to Tennessee where Lucy Sessions continued her philanthropic work, including serving as president of the local Women’s Christian Temperance Union. She and her husband later moved to Los Angeles, California before her death in 1910.

Charlotte E. Ray was one of seven children. She was born in 1850 in New York City. She was raised by a father who was a minister and active in the abolitionist movement and the Underground Railroad. Charlotte Ray received her education at the institution for the Education of Colored Youth in Washington D.C. and went on to teach at Howard University. She earned a law degree in 1872 and became one of the first black women to be admitted to the District of Columbia Bar and argue cases in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. She became involved in the women’s suffrage movement and joined the National Association of Colored Women., inspiring many to transcend the strictures of racism and misogyny.

“Open your mouth, judge righteously, defend the rights of the poor and needy.” (Proverbs 31:9, ESV)

 

Previous Posts

Embody
The human body is riveting, intricate, and sophisticated. It also is vulnerable and can be twisted, therefore I can’t help but ponder its origin. I think the origin of the physical body is the human mind, not God. In the first chapter of ...

posted 11:37:10am May. 17, 2015 | read full post »

Free e-book offer on Science and Health
The first person to use the code below can receive a free E-book of 21st Century Science and Health at www.trafford.com/bookstub 10200000231756     ...

posted 11:24:16am May. 14, 2015 | read full post »

Happy Mother's Day
I hope your day is blessed. Thank you for nurturing innocence and integrity. Thank you for comforting the hurting. Thank you for hugging your inner self. Happy Mother's Day. ...

posted 2:34:02pm May. 10, 2015 | read full post »

Picking up litter
Our spring may be slow in coming this year in upstate New York. The trees haven’t even leafed out yet. Once the snow was gone, I picked up litter. Plenty of it, sad to say. The bags get so heavy that I leave them alongside the ...

posted 10:47:49am May. 05, 2015 | read full post »

Time warp
Airplanes carry us around the world into yesterday or tomorrow. These experiences tweak my perceptions. I see my mind traveling to yesterday or tomorrow. Probably too often. I’d like to think I live in the now, but the infinite Mind ...

posted 12:55:09pm Apr. 29, 2015 | read full post »

Advertisement


Report as Inappropriate

You are reporting this content because it violates the Terms of Service.

All reported content is logged for investigation.